University Financing – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 14:10:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png University Financing – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 China vows to end funding for overseas coal-fired power plants https://cec-ugc.org/china-vows-to-end-funding-for-overseas-coal-fired-power-plants/ https://cec-ugc.org/china-vows-to-end-funding-for-overseas-coal-fired-power-plants/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 13:43:57 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/china-vows-to-end-funding-for-overseas-coal-fired-power-plants/ Although the leader did not set a timetable to end this funding, he noted that Beijing had not directed any funding from its Belt and Road Initiative towards coal-fired power plants so far this year. Xi also did not address the domestic situation, where coal makes up the majority of the country’s electricity mix. Dozens […]]]>

Although the leader did not set a timetable to end this funding, he noted that Beijing had not directed any funding from its Belt and Road Initiative towards coal-fired power plants so far this year.

Xi also did not address the domestic situation, where coal makes up the majority of the country’s electricity mix. Dozens of new coal-fired and steel-fired power plants across the country were announced in the first half of 2021. If built, they alone would add 150 million tonnes of annual carbon dioxide emissions, according to the group. Global Energy Monitor research team.

The pledge from China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases and the world’s largest funder of coal-fired power plants, has been greeted with caution by experts.

“This is the announcement China could make now and the one the United States wanted. Investments are already moving in this direction, ”said Joanna Lewis, associate professor at Georgetown University and an expert in Chinese climate policy, in a statement. Tweeter.

* Chart by Reuters. (Click above to enlarge)

Climate advocacy movement 350.org called Xi’s statement “huge,” saying it could “be a game-changer” depending on when it goes into effect.

“China was the last man standing. If there is no public funding for coal from China, there is little to no global expansion of coal, ”said Justin Guay, director of global climate strategy at the Sunrise Project, an advocacy group. for a global transition from coal and fossil fuels.

Beijing has supported coal projects in developing countries, including Indonesia and Bangladesh, and has come under heavy diplomatic pressure to end funding intended to help the world meet the goals of the Paris agreement on the climate to reduce carbon emissions.

“We’ve been in discussions with China for some time about this. And I am absolutely delighted to hear that President Xi has taken this important decision, ”US Climate Envoy John Kerry said in a statement.

Downstairs but not outside

As countries around the world experience power shortages, BMO Capital commodities analyst Colin Hamilton said it’s clear thermal coal is likely to remain a key energy source for the foreseeable future. .

“China will continue to fund energy projects abroad, with a push to develop green and low-carbon energy projects, which could result in new nuclear facilities in addition to ‘renewable energy. “”, he wrote.

“China’s engagement could affect both demand and supply in the maritime market and put pressure on prices in the long run.”

Shirley Zhang, Analyst at Wood Mackenzie

China’s engagement could affect both demand and supply in the maritime market and put pressure on prices in the long run, warned Wood Mackenzie, an energy and mining consultant.

According to WoodMac analyst Shirley Zhang, projects that are not financially committed and rely heavily on foreign investment, such as projects in Indonesia and Vietnam, would be hit the hardest.

“In particular, our hypothesis of 29 GW generic coal projects in Indonesia after 2025 could be threatened due to China’s commitment, forcing more supply of Indonesian coal to export markets,” he said. she stated in a statement sent by email.

China’s policy shift, which is part of a goal of peaking coal consumption by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2060, follows similar pledges made by Japan and Korea from the South earlier this year.

The pledge, which could wipe out nearly $ 50 billion in investment, is expected to give momentum to global climate talks in November in Glasgow, Scotland.



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Behrend researchers shortlisted for Great Lakes Leadership Awards https://cec-ugc.org/behrend-researchers-shortlisted-for-great-lakes-leadership-awards/ https://cec-ugc.org/behrend-researchers-shortlisted-for-great-lakes-leadership-awards/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 18:23:16 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/behrend-researchers-shortlisted-for-great-lakes-leadership-awards/ Two researchers from Penn State Behrend have been shortlisted for the 2021 Great Lakes Leadership Award, which recognizes work to raise awareness of critical issues in the Great Lakes ecosystem. Each will receive $ 10,000 in funding to advance their research. The awards are sponsored by the Great Lakes Protection Fund, a nonprofit organization that […]]]>

Two researchers from Penn State Behrend have been shortlisted for the 2021 Great Lakes Leadership Award, which recognizes work to raise awareness of critical issues in the Great Lakes ecosystem. Each will receive $ 10,000 in funding to advance their research.

The awards are sponsored by the Great Lakes Protection Fund, a nonprofit organization that has invested $ 91 million in projects pioneering new technologies, practices and fundraising strategies that restore and support the health of the Great Lakes. This year, two of the fund’s six prizes are awarded to Behrend researchers:

Allegra Cangelosi, Principal Investigator at Penn State Behrend, has been shortlisted for the 2021 Great Lakes Leadership Award. She studies ballast water and the transfer of aquatic invasive species.

Allegra Cangelosi, a senior researcher at Behrend, was selected for her work advancing ballast water treatment on transoceanic ships, an environmental protection measure that has dramatically reduced the transfer of invasive species to the Great Lakes.

Cangelosi has partnered with researchers at Wayne State University and the University of Wisconsin-Superior to develop best practices for monitoring ballast water in transport ships. It also uses eDNA – “environmental” DNA – to develop rapid tests that identify the presence of target organisms in a body of water.

“Its real superpower is to bring together disparate teams around a common goal,” said David Rankin, executive director of the Great Lakes Protection Fund. “She took 15 different interests and created a team that together took an idea and turned it into something sitting on the deck of a ship.”

Cangelosi previously worked as a principal investigator for the Great Waters Research Collaborative and as president of the Northeast-Midwest Institute, which promotes economic vitality, environmental quality and regional equity in 18 states.

Sherri “Sam” Mason, director of sustainability at Penn State Behrend, was selected for her study of microplastic pollution in the Great Lakes, including Lake Erie. His work contributed to the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to ban plastic microbeads in facial creams and shampoos – a policy change that led to new production guarantees at L’Oréal and Unilever, among other companies.

Mason has contributed to the Joint Expert Group on Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection, which advises the United Nations on scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. She has been quoted in Consumer Reports, Time magazine and BBC News.

“Her research into detecting the presence of plastic in beer, drinking water and salt was groundbreaking,” Rankin said, “but she is a pioneer in sharing this information with a wider audience and encouraging people to to act.”

Prior to joining Behrend, Mason taught at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

“These awards recognize the contributions of two exceptional individuals whose pioneering research over many years in two critical areas has had a significant impact on the protection of the entire Great Lakes Basin,” said Ivor Knight, Associate Dean to research and graduate studies at Behrend. “They are true trailblazers, and we are fortunate to have them each at Penn State Behrend.”

To learn more about the Great Lakes Leadership Awards and the Great Lakes Protection Fund, visit http://glpf.org/.


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New poor linked to quality problems in higher education https://cec-ugc.org/new-poor-linked-to-quality-problems-in-higher-education/ https://cec-ugc.org/new-poor-linked-to-quality-problems-in-higher-education/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:38:11 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/new-poor-linked-to-quality-problems-in-higher-education/ KENYA The shock of the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya has forced large numbers of young university graduates and their counterparts from other higher education institutions into extreme poverty, according to a World Bank report, which indicates that “new poor ”are in urban areas. The report, Kenya Economic Update: Rising Above The Waves, states that the […]]]>

KENYA

The shock of the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya has forced large numbers of young university graduates and their counterparts from other higher education institutions into extreme poverty, according to a World Bank report, which indicates that “new poor ”are in urban areas.

The report, Kenya Economic Update: Rising Above The Waves, states that the new poor have a different profile from the existing poor population which is predominantly rural, works in agriculture and has little or no higher education.

“The new poor often live in urban areas, are engaged in manufacturing and services, and have higher levels of education.

Although the situation may be temporary, the report argues that the crisis has caused severe income losses and hardship as some households may not withstand future shocks, especially those without jobs. well paid and who depend mainly on hard-hit urban service. companies.

According to the World Bank, the COVID-19 pandemic has only worsened an already worsening situation as employment in Kenya has shifted from a steady-paying job to self-employment in micro- informal businesses, especially among young graduates.

In this regard, the World Bank warns that the problem could worsen soon, given that Kenya’s largest age cohort is between 10 and 14 years old and will be ready to join the labor market within 10 years. coming years.

Massive increase in the working-age population

“During the decade 2020 to 2029, Kenya’s working-age population will grow by an average of one million per year,” noted the report which was prepared by a team of researchers from Macroeconomics, Trade and Global Investment. World Bank practice.

To overcome the seemingly worsening situation, the report says the solution lies in Kenya’s higher education system providing graduates with the skills employers are looking for.

But, while Kenya has made progress in improving access to higher education, skills remain low among the current stock of workers. According to the World Bank, workers often lack basic skills such as reading, writing or basic computer skills.

A skills survey, known as the ‘Kenya – STEP Skills Measurement Household Survey 2013 (Wave 2)’, conducted in Kenya a few years ago, found that most adults with secondary education are functionally illiterate in English, while of those with a university education, less than a quarter are functionally literate in English, which is the language commonly used in most businesses and government offices in Kenya.

“In addition, employers identify the inability to manage computers for work-related tasks as one of the most significant skills gaps among white-collar workers in Kenya,” the report notes.

An expanding higher education system

The crux of the matter, according to the World Bank report, is that university education in Kenya has grown rapidly with limited resources.

Over the past decade, universities have grown from seven public chartered universities and 15 constituent colleges in 2012 to 31 public chartered universities and seven constituent colleges in 2019, while private chartered universities have grown from 15 to 36.

As a result, enrollment increased from around 440,000 learners in the 2014-15 academic year to around 520,000 in 2017-18, making Kenya the country with the fourth highest concentration of university students in sub-Saharan Africa. after Nigeria, South Africa and Ethiopia.

But the rapid expansion has come at the cost of quality because, according to the World Bank, most of Kenya’s public and private universities do not have enough qualified staff.

“Soaring student-teacher ratios have undermined the quality of existing programs, as teaching and other learning practices continue to be traditional in most higher education institutions, with an over-reliance on rote learning and obsolete programs, ”says the World Bank report.

On whether universities would be able to recover quickly in the current environment, Dr Alex Sienaert, Senior Economist for Kenya in the World Bank’s Global Practice Macroeconomics, Trade and Investment and one of the authors of the report, said the funding situation is constrained, with universities facing serious cash flow problems, declining financial resources and debt.

As of April of this year, the debt of public universities stood at about KES 57 billion (about $ 518 million), according to the University Funding Council.

In his report, Geoffrey Monari, chief executive of the board, said the debt came mainly in the form of legal deductions from workers such as income tax, pension funds and non-payment of staff savings to their associations.

Although the government has been promising to undertake reforms in higher education for some time, in recent days the International Monetary Fund has called for urgent radical reforms at the University of Nairobi and Kenyatta University, two of the largest universities in Kenya.

Even so, it appears that Kenya’s higher education sector, for now and in the near future, will continue to suffer from quality and funding issues, meaning that many universities will not be in. able to provide the skills that could prevent educated youth from falling into extreme poverty. .


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UIC rewarded for its commitment to diversity https://cec-ugc.org/uic-rewarded-for-its-commitment-to-diversity/ https://cec-ugc.org/uic-rewarded-for-its-commitment-to-diversity/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 20:25:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/uic-rewarded-for-its-commitment-to-diversity/ Newswise – The University of Illinois at Chicago was recognized for its efforts in diversity by receiving the HEED (Higher Education Excellence in Diversity) award from Insight into Diversity magazine for the sixth year. UIC is one of 101 institutions featured in the November issue of Insight into Diversity, the oldest and largest publication dedicated […]]]>

Newswise – The University of Illinois at Chicago was recognized for its efforts in diversity by receiving the HEED (Higher Education Excellence in Diversity) award from Insight into Diversity magazine for the sixth year.

UIC is one of 101 institutions featured in the November issue of Insight into Diversity, the oldest and largest publication dedicated to diversity in higher education. Each year, the publication recognizes U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate exceptional commitment to diversity and inclusion.

The university received the award for its level of achievement and the intensity of its commitment to expanding diversity and inclusion on campus through initiatives, programs and outreach, according to the publication. In addition, UIC’s efforts to increase student recruitment, retention and completion – as well as faculty hiring practices – have also been honored, said Amalia Pallares, Associate Chancellor and Vice-Rector. diversity at UIC.

The university is an Institution Serving Pacific Islanders of Asian and Native American Descent (AANAPISI) and an Institution Serving Hispanics (HSI), designated by the United States Department of Education.

UIC is one of 16 HSI 1 research institutions nationwide, and the majority of its undergraduate students are eligible to receive Federal Pell Grants. This year, all UIC registrations a recording for the highest number of registrations in its history for the seventh consecutive year.

UIC’s efforts to increase diversity were reinforced by the new freshman class this fall. Of the 4,177 new freshmen at UIC, the number of black freshmen jumped 25%, the largest percentage increase among ethnic groups this year. Latin American freshmen were up 19.5% from the previous year, the largest overall campus-wide increase.

“UIC’s diversity, equity and inclusion efforts have helped make it one of the most diverse higher education institutions in the country, providing students with access to one of the few 1 HSI research establishments nationwide and at the only public research university in Chicago, ”Pallares said.

Among the inclusion efforts highlighted was the UIC [email protected] Network Access Program for the Advancement of Science ([email protected] GANAS), which created a learning community of approximately 45 Hispanic / Latino university researchers with transition coaching, peer mentoring and support. The effort led to better grades and better retention, according to Pallares.

Additionally, the implementation of iAdvise, a centralized academic advice sharing system for undergraduates, has helped provide support to new and former students. In order to increase diversity in STEM fields of study, the campus recently started the DuSable researchers program to attract and support black and Latino students in STEM.

UIC’s holistic approach to its admissions process targets communities with talented but marginalized students, offering transition coaching to assist students with college applications and funding in high schools with large populations of students. latino and black students.

UIC automatically accepts the highest 4% of all high school students in Illinois as part of its Admissions Via Excellence program, and in an effort to recruit Native American students, UIC offers Native American students from outside state tuition fees in the state if they are from recognized tribal nations

Several initiatives were also highlighted to support efforts to diversify the ranks of faculty at UIC.

UIC’s Bridge-to-Faculty program aims to recruit under-represented minority postdoctoral researchers to have the opportunity to be offered a junior professor position in departments with few or no under-represented professors within two years. . This includes support to departments that recruit and mentor postdoctoral fellows through a cohort program structure. The UIC Pipeline to an Inclusive Faculty Program recruits and supports outstanding under-represented graduate students interested in pursuing careers as faculty members. The Under-Represented Faculty Recruitment Program helps recruit diverse faculty by providing additional research support.

“Each of these programs offers peer mentoring with other professors in the department, inter-campus networking and skills support through individual trainings and group workshops,” according to UIC’s request.

For the first time this year, magazine officials asked how COVID-19 has impacted diversity efforts on campuses.

UIC’s diversity officers have played an active role as members of the university’s COVID-19 response and planning team. Officials listed several steps they have taken to help students, including offering additional mental health support, ensuring that food insecure students receive free food, and ensuring that all students have access to computers and the Internet for e-learning; and ensuring that e-learning is accessible to students with disabilities.

Additional funds and resources have been provided for students, faculty and staff to switch to distance and blended learning and provide a safe working environment, officials said.


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What the Covid-19 revealed about hunger https://cec-ugc.org/what-the-covid-19-revealed-about-hunger/ https://cec-ugc.org/what-the-covid-19-revealed-about-hunger/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/what-the-covid-19-revealed-about-hunger/ Mon Sep 20, 2021 12:00 AM Children line up for food at a school near Cape Town, South Africa in 2020, during the Covid-19 lockdown. File photo: Reuters “> Children line up for food at a school near Cape Town, South Africa in 2020, during the Covid-19 lockdown. File photo: Reuters In South Africa, many […]]]>

Children line up for food at a school near Cape Town, South Africa in 2020, during the Covid-19 lockdown. File photo: Reuters

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Children line up for food at a school near Cape Town, South Africa in 2020, during the Covid-19 lockdown. File photo: Reuters

In South Africa, many people find it difficult to access sufficient amounts of healthy food. Because their diet is high in processed foods, refined starch, sugar and fat, they face a double burden of malnutrition and obesity, or what is known as “hidden hunger”. It is hidden because it does not fit the stereotypical image of hunger created by media coverage of famines. But it’s everywhere.

To be clear, the problem is not a shortage of food. In South Africa, hunger is the result of lack of access. Getting enough calories and adequate nutrients is largely linked to income. Beyond the high cost of healthy food, the hidden hunger in the country reflects the limited availability of nutritious products in low-income areas, the cost of energy for cooking, food storage and lack of access. to land for household food production.

The Covid-19 pandemic and the strict measures imposed to contain its spread brought the hidden hunger out of hiding, as many people who had been able to afford just enough food to survive suddenly found themselves without. According to a study, 47 percent of households in South Africa ran out of money to buy food during the early stages of the initial foreclosure in April 2020. Job losses, crackdown on informal vendors and price increases caused by interruptions to global food and agricultural supply chains have all contributed to a sharp increase in food insecurity. Images of long queues for emergency food aid have publicized the problem. The increase in hunger levels among children in particular was concerning, but not surprisingly, given the abrupt closure of schools and school-based nutrition programs.

The pandemic has also made the consequences of hidden hunger more apparent. Because proper nutrition is necessary for a healthy immune system, food insecure people are more likely to get sick. Additionally, there is a correlation between the severity of Covid-19 and diabetes, a disease associated with poor diet. Data from Cape Town suggests that patients with Covid-19 diabetes were nearly four times more likely to be hospitalized, and more than three times more likely to die from the pandemic, than patients without diabetes.

But while Covid-19 has increased food insecurity and highlighted the consequences of hunger, it has also produced potential solutions to increase access to healthy and affordable food. In the face of disruptions in global supply chains, more localized food systems began to emerge. When the government failed to implement adequate measures to offset the economic impact of blockages or the closure of school nutrition programs, civil society groups sought to fill the void. Across South Africa, community action networks have sprung up to fight hunger, with volunteers providing meals and other assistance to other members of the community.

Around Johannesburg, for example, the C19 People’s Coalition sought to connect small farmers, who have lost access to their home markets, with communities in need of food assistance. Unlike most government food packages, which were purchased from large corporations and contained non-perishable items with almost no nutritional value, these vegetable packages sought to support the livelihoods of small farmers while promoting health. vulnerable households.

And yet, the state has an important responsibility in the fight against hidden hunger, especially in South Africa, where the right to food is enshrined in the constitution. And examples from around the world demonstrate what is possible when a committed government works with civil society to tackle food insecurity.

In Belo Horizonte, a city in Brazil, dubbed “the city that ended hunger,” some of the notable programs include “popular restaurants” that serve thousands of healthy subsidized meals every day, subsidized fruit and vegetable shops. , a food bank that collects waste food and distributes prepared meals to social organizations, and farm stalls to directly connect small producers to urban consumers. These and other programs support the livelihoods of farmers and the health of consumers, while providing economic benefits and strengthening communities.

The upcoming United Nations Food Systems Summit says it will bring together different stakeholders to create more sustainable and equitable food systems, but grassroots movements, academics and civil society groups have criticized the summit for bypassing the United Nations Committee on World Food Security to create a new forum tarnished by undue corporate influence, lack of transparency and irresponsible decision-making. These groups have called for a boycott and are organizing a global counter-mobilization.

The big companies that are expected to dominate the UN summit – seed companies, agrochemical producers, food processors and retailers – do not have real solutions to fight hunger. Treating food as a commodity to be sold for profit, rather than a basic human right, is precisely what led to the hidden hunger crisis. Surprisingly, South Africa’s largest supermarket chains managed to generate profits in 2020, even when half of the country’s households could not afford to eat. Retailers bragged about their food donations while paying their workers – who have been designated “essential” – some of the lowest wages in the country.

The real solutions to the hidden hunger crisis must come from those most affected: small farmers producing healthy food for their communities and low-income consumers struggling to access adequate food. These voices were sidelined from the United Nations summit, but the solidarity initiatives they created during the pandemic represent the surest foundation on which to build a fairer and more resilient food system.

Brittany Kesselman is a postdoctoral researcher at the Society, Work, and Politics Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.

Copyright: Project Syndicat, 2021

www.project-syndicate.org

(Exclusive to The Daily Star)


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Latin American universities deserve more https://cec-ugc.org/latin-american-universities-deserve-more/ https://cec-ugc.org/latin-american-universities-deserve-more/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 06:11:15 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/latin-american-universities-deserve-more/ LATIN AMERICA The economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has a long way to go. While many countries still struggle to cope with the terrible impact of the disease, there is one region that has been hit much harder than any other: Latin America. COVID-19 is having a particularly devastating impact on higher education in […]]]>

LATIN AMERICA

The economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has a long way to go. While many countries still struggle to cope with the terrible impact of the disease, there is one region that has been hit much harder than any other: Latin America. COVID-19 is having a particularly devastating impact on higher education in the region.

Economic data tells a dark story. While global gross domestic product (GDP) shrank 3% in 2020 in response to the pandemic, Latin America’s 7% contraction was the largest in the world. A host of supporting data explains the grim context of universities in Latin America.

According to the International Monetary Fund, it is estimated that poverty has increased by 19 million people and that inequality has increased by 5% from pre-crisis levels. The pandemic is expected to cause lasting damage to human capital due to school closures, which have lasted longer than in other regions.

It is an uneven picture. Chile, which enjoys one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, is expected to see its economy rebound this year to its pre-pandemic GDP level. Much of the rest of the continent has been hampered by slow vaccination programs.

The true extent of the pandemic may not be known for some time. But a sobering assessment by The Economist newspaper reports that Latin America and the Caribbean have the highest excess death rates in the world during the pandemic. This has long-term implications for the financing of higher education.

According to the World Bank Watch over education finances 2021 report, two-thirds of low- and lower-middle-income countries have reduced their education budgets since the onset of COVID-19. One-third of upper-middle-income countries have cut their education budgets.

He warns that “these budget cuts have been relatively small so far, but there is a risk that future cuts will be larger, as the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the economy and the fiscal situation worsens” .

Latin American universities are likely to feel the brunt of this economic pain, as the region’s economy has been hit the hardest.

Can international philanthropy help?

Logic could follow that international philanthropy may well step in and mitigate the pandemic’s worst financial excesses on higher education. But the evidence for this does not seem convincing.

Indiana University 2020 Global Philanthropy Tracking concludes that cross-border philanthropy exceeds US $ 834 billion.

While Latin America is a large recipient of remittances, a form of philanthropy as determined by Indiana, private philanthropy – donations by foundations and trusts – remains weak. In our opinion, extraordinarily.

According to the OECD Center on Philanthropy, approximately US $ 1.6 billion in philanthropy went to Latin America from a sample of the world’s 30 largest philanthropic foundations. And 90% of this sum was injected into the region by the BBVA Microfinance Foundation, a branch of a Spanish financial institution. Less than US $ 200 million went to causes other than microfinance.

The Gates Foundation represents the most surprising illustration of how Latin America and the Caribbean is neglected compared to the rest of the world. Between 2010 and 2019, Gates’ global donations exceeded $ 67 billion.

But, according to Gates’ own data, direct funding to Latin America is paltry. Universities in the region have received barely US $ 24 million over these 10 years; in contrast, European universities received more than US $ 2 billion. In 2019, Gates awarded $ 1.6 billion to 202 universities around the world. None of these universities were in Latin America.

It wasn’t just Gates who pulled the funding out of Latin America. Statistics from the OECD suggest that some of the larger foundations were either not present or are withdrawing from the region. Philanthropic funding can be uneven, so it remains to be seen whether the funding cuts are permanent.

But the point is nonetheless relevant. Why are the major philanthropic institutions in the United States so ambivalent in supporting philanthropy in Latin America, and especially in funding Latin American higher education?

Why are philanthropists hesitant to invest?

There doesn’t seem to be a clear answer. One explanation provided by a senior UNESCO official is that there is a fierce culture of independence among universities in Latin America. Accepting donations from outside sources, especially from foreign donors, carries the risk that impartiality will be perceived as compromised.

This is a characteristic that can distinguish Latin America from other regional cultures. Latin America has maintained a long-standing non-commercial open access research approach where scientific publication is managed by academic institutions.

Scholarly production – the production, publication, distribution, and consumption of research literature – has always operated free of charge and has been funded primarily by public funds earmarked for education and research, primarily through research and development. ‘academic institutions. This creates a less “commercial” culture.

But while academic independence may be the explanation in some cases, there are probably other reasons. After all, arguments of academic integrity have not prevented institutions elsewhere in the world from accessing international philanthropy.

Another explanation given is that universities in Latin America are often linked by research programs that tend to be more regional than global. For example, Brazil would spend around US $ 1 billion per year on agricultural research, reflecting the importance of agriculture to its economy. But that doesn’t seem to count for much, with foundations like Gates being one of the major funders of plant and agricultural science.

A more compelling argument concerns visibility, fundraising culture and infrastructure. Low visibility and limited opportunities for engagement, compounded by the language barrier, could help Latin America miss the boom in global philanthropy that is expected to be a hallmark of the coming decade.

Indiana University explains that “a global increase in middle and upper income individuals and diaspora communities will lead to greater engagement in cross-border philanthropy.” He also argues that technology will make cross-border charitable giving easier, faster and more secure.

Logically, universities in Latin America should be well placed to take advantage of the increase in global giving since so much philanthropic wealth resides in the United States, and the United States has deep social, commercial, and economic ties to the United States. Latin America.

The need for a change in mentality

But are they just Latin American university leaders pushing their way to the gates of donors in Silicon Valley or New York to showcase their products? This model is starting to look outdated and smack of unfairness, as it rewards institutions that have the resources to invest in large engagement efforts and preparation for procurement-type demands.

A shift in mindset is needed among some of the big finance institutions, especially those in the United States, about where they should invest their capital internationally and how they should identify which institutions need it most. and where the potential is greatest.

The United States should care about Latin America and its universities. Universities are important because they are avenues out of poverty and the pillars of a stable society. Knowledge from a university benefits everyone – nation-state level and globally.

The current US introspection on racial inequality is, in truth, the prelude to a much larger conversation about greater global equity that is expected to challenge, disrupt, and seed American society over the next decade. The existing models of philanthropic funding for universities, as biased as they often are towards privileged institutions in northern countries, already seem out of step with the times.

The uncomfortable truth is that American institutional philanthropy has for too long reinforced an Anglo-Saxon or Western European bias that seems at odds with a modern America, in which nearly 20% of its population is Hispanic.

The historic vehicles of US soft power – its philanthropic foundations – could and should make a much larger contribution to supporting quality and long-standing higher education institutions in Latin America. That he does so little is a bad reflection on the current leadership of this rapidly growing collective.

Marcelo Mazariegos is the former Director of Institutional Affairs at the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara in Mexico. Andrew Wigley is the founder of UniversityPhilanthropy.com.


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You can benefit from a tax advantage on the interest of a mortgage taken out with my father https://cec-ugc.org/you-can-benefit-from-a-tax-advantage-on-the-interest-of-a-mortgage-taken-out-with-my-father/ https://cec-ugc.org/you-can-benefit-from-a-tax-advantage-on-the-interest-of-a-mortgage-taken-out-with-my-father/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:24:31 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/you-can-benefit-from-a-tax-advantage-on-the-interest-of-a-mortgage-taken-out-with-my-father/ Question: I am considering buying a house that my dad is willing to lend me for. I will reimburse it on the basis of EMI (Principal + Interest). Can I claim deductions for this home loan? What documents do I need to submit to the income tax office to claim the interest and principal deduction? […]]]>

Question: I am considering buying a house that my dad is willing to lend me for. I will reimburse it on the basis of EMI (Principal + Interest). Can I claim deductions for this home loan? What documents do I need to submit to the income tax office to claim the interest and principal deduction?

Answer: To claim income tax deductions for the principal part included in an IME, the home loan must have been taken out with specified entities such as central or state government, any bank, including the cooperative bank, the LIC, the National Housing Bank, any housing company, any cooperative company engaged in the granting of loans for the financing of the construction of a house, your employer which is a public company or a company of public sector or university, etc. Since you plan to take out your father’s loan, you will not receive any income tax refund for any principal repayment of a home loan available under Section 80 C.

However, there is no such restriction as regards the payment of interest on the borrowed capital, so you will be able to claim the deduction of interest due until ??2 lakh in case the property is independent. In the event that the property is rented out, you can claim the full interest subject to the limitation of the maximum amount of compensation for loss of income from the property of the house with other income during the year up to ??2 lakh. Uncompensated losses during the year can be carried forward to be deducted from the home ownership income over the next 8 years. Please note that the interest you pay to your father is his income and that your father will have to include this interest on his income tax return for the year (s) concerned.

You will need a certificate from your father indicating the amount of interest payable for each year, which may be required by the income tax officer during the tax process. Additionally, you will need to conclusively prove that the borrowed money was actually used to purchase the property.

Balwant Jain is a tax and investment expert and can be reached on jainbalwant @ gmail and @jainbalwant on Twitter.com.

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The entrepreneurial ecosystem in Spain is increasingly consolidated, according to South Summit and IE University https://cec-ugc.org/the-entrepreneurial-ecosystem-in-spain-is-increasingly-consolidated-according-to-south-summit-and-ie-university/ https://cec-ugc.org/the-entrepreneurial-ecosystem-in-spain-is-increasingly-consolidated-according-to-south-summit-and-ie-university/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:27:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/the-entrepreneurial-ecosystem-in-spain-is-increasingly-consolidated-according-to-south-summit-and-ie-university/ This article was translated from our Spanish edition. Opinions expressed by Contractor the contributors are theirs. You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise. The Spanish entrepreneurial ecosystem is consolidating its maturity, according to the South Summit ‘Entrepreneurship map 2021’ presented this Tuesday at IE University. Spanish startups have overtaken 2.7 years […]]]>

This article was translated from our Spanish edition. Opinions expressed by Contractor the contributors are theirs.

You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise.

The Spanish entrepreneurial ecosystem is consolidating its maturity, according to the South Summit ‘Entrepreneurship map 2021’ presented this Tuesday at IE University. Spanish startups have overtaken 2.7 years of life, which shows more mature projects compared to previous years (2.2 years average lifespan in 2019 and 2.5 in 2020). Despite this, the average age of Spanish projects remains lower than that of European projects, which are 2.87 years on average, and well below that of Latin American startups, which record 3.23 years of life as an average.

Austin Distel via Unsplash

Data from this eighth edition of the report Entrepreneurship Map 2021 ‘ through Spain Startup-Sud Summit confirm that the European country has a very stable percentage of serial entrepreneurs (60%), who bring great professional strength to the startup, and new stratuperos (40%), characterized by their criteria to identify market opportunities. 35% of entrepreneurs say they have sold at least one startup and around 6 in 10 confirm the failure of at least one of their previous projects. In both cases, the probability of failure decreases with experience and learning.

Although the entrepreneurial ecosystem is getting stronger day by day in Spain, it still has a pending question to increase the presence of female talent in its ranks. The imbalance of the ecosystem due to the greater presence of men vs. women (80% vs. 20%) is a reality that cuts across geography and all industrial sectors.

In this edition of the report, the presence of women in sectors such as e-commerce, tourism, agro-tech and energy has increased, to the detriment of others already classic such as Fintech, where the presence of women entrepreneurs has increased. been reduced.

The entrepreneurial ecosystem has been consolidated at the global level with very homogeneous characteristics between the different countries. There is a growing commitment to AI as an engine of opportunity and great potential to improve the Internet of Things. In addition, we share the global challenge of integrating women into the entrepreneurial ecosystem, says Salvador Aragon , professor of innovation at IE University.

Regarding the robot portrait of the spanish entrepreneur , it has remained stable in recent years: male (80%), with an average age between 25 and 34 years and university studies (98%) .

In this eighth edition of the map, it is confirmed that the Training “places” within the entrepreneurial ecosystem: Spanish entrepreneurs continue the trend to have a high qualification: 16% have a doctorate, maximum professional training. This profile is engaged in the creation of innovative startups in key sectors, such as: Health, Agriculture, Digitization, Energy or Transport , thanks to the application of advanced technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine learning .

Where does the motivation to start a business come from?

45% entrepreneurs assure that ” I always wanted to undertake “, while for 28% the option was given because “they found a market opportunity “.

Historical maximum capital

If we talk about funding sources, 62% of Spanish startups have their own funds as the first economic resource, an alternative which records a historical maximum compared to Family, Friends and Fools (19%), private (15%) or public (5%) funds. In any case, startups are not only looking for more funding (19%) or gaining visibility (18%), they also claim to improve. Taxation as a priority need.

The vast majority of Spanish startups have already launched their own product (62%) and it generates traction. In addition, the maturity of the ecosystem is also measured by the ability to generate employment opportunities: 74% of Spanish projects already have between 2 and 10 employees, while 17% have between 10 and 50 professionals in their team. Regarding the level of income, in Spain 12.2% of startups have Positive EBITDA and the forecast is very good, given that an additional 37% are confident they will achieve it in one year.

More and more Spanish startups can be seen as scaling up , that is to say a project in its most developed phase which has already advanced in the execution of its economic model, consolidating its growth in terms of both turnover and staff. If we focus on their situation: 24% of scaled already charge more than a million euros and 60% have more than 10 employees, their preferred sector is education and AI, the most common tool with which they work.

One year more FinTech remains positioned as the “queen” industry of the entrepreneurial ecosystem, but Agrotech and E-commerce entered into force in 2021, the two sectors being strongly influenced by the trends that emerged following the pandemic. Regarding the economic model, subscription continues to grow as the favorite of Spanish startups.


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Meridian Capital Group arranges $ 18.8 million financing for multi-family property https://cec-ugc.org/meridian-capital-group-arranges-18-8-million-financing-for-multi-family-property/ https://cec-ugc.org/meridian-capital-group-arranges-18-8-million-financing-for-multi-family-property/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 05:05:15 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/meridian-capital-group-arranges-18-8-million-financing-for-multi-family-property/ Boston, Massachusetts Meridian Capital Group has arranged an $ 18.8 million financing to refinance a multi-family property located on Hemenway St. The 10-year loan from a balance sheet lender has a fixed rate of 3% and three years of interest-only payments followed by a 30-year amortization schedule. This transaction was negotiated by Meridian’s senior vice […]]]>

Boston, Massachusetts Meridian Capital Group has arranged an $ 18.8 million financing to refinance a multi-family property located on Hemenway St.

The 10-year loan from a balance sheet lender has a fixed rate of 3% and three years of interest-only payments followed by a 30-year amortization schedule. This transaction was negotiated by Meridian’s senior vice president Zev Feder and vice president Jason Bogopulsky, who are based at the company’s headquarters in New York.

Zev Feder
Jason bogopulsky

Located on Hemenway Street, the property’s 30 units span 50,736 square feet and feature high ceilings, extensive amenities and ample living space. The building is located in the thriving East Fenway neighborhood, home of the Boston Red Sox and close to Northeastern University and Boston University.

“This property is a major asset to the Fenway community for local professionals and students who rely on the complex as a centralized home base for their daily commute between class and work. This transaction illustrates how stable the student housing market remains despite some of the rental challenges due to the onset of COVID-19 in 2020. We have had the great privilege of working with a strong local operator as well as a local lender who both understand the importance of property to the Boston area student community. Based on sponsorship and asset fundamentals, Meridian was able to proceed with the loan despite unprecedented market challenges, ”said Feder.


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Hyderabad-based GradRight Streamlines Higher Education Funding for Students and Lenders https://cec-ugc.org/hyderabad-based-gradright-streamlines-higher-education-funding-for-students-and-lenders/ https://cec-ugc.org/hyderabad-based-gradright-streamlines-higher-education-funding-for-students-and-lenders/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 13:49:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/hyderabad-based-gradright-streamlines-higher-education-funding-for-students-and-lenders/ Hyderabad: GradRight, a higher education-focused fintech company born in Hyderabad, is trying to change the way students finance their studies by bringing together students, banks and universities on a single platform, reducing research and research time. approving loans from 2-3 months to only 3-4 days and saving lakhs for each student. The company aims to […]]]>

Hyderabad: GradRight, a higher education-focused fintech company born in Hyderabad, is trying to change the way students finance their studies by bringing together students, banks and universities on a single platform, reducing research and research time. approving loans from 2-3 months to only 3-4 days and saving lakhs for each student.

The company aims to disrupt technology, re-innovate the fintech model to facilitate the funding process and maximize returns on investment for students.

Data shows that at least 50 percent of Indian students cannot get admission due to funding issues, and institutions are losing promising students after going through the rigorous and lengthy outreach and selection process. Almost 80 percent of students have loans that cost more than required and incur unnecessary tuition fees.

Hyderabad News

click here for more information on Hyderabad

Sasidhar Sista, co-founder of GradRight, told Telangana Today, in an exclusive interview: “We have seen major problems with variations in credit policies for student loans and ineffectiveness / automation of the loan process. Finding the money to get the right education is a global problem. To solve this problem, we have developed the world’s first education loan offerings platform (in just 22 days) where finance institutions transparently bid for student loans. This helps students get the best loans possible, on time, from the comfort of their own homes, and never run out of enrollment after gaining admission.

The tendering process aims to put the student at the center of the process. If it works for the student, GradRight believes it will work for the lender and the university. The effort is to secure the cheapest loan to a student by lowering interest rates to allow for financial viability.

The platform defines some main points and makes lenders and students interact. A student creates a profile on the platform, the anonymous file is sent to the lender with all the data points needed to assess the student’s profile. A GradRight member acts as an advisor to streamline the process. The loan is thus approved.

For lenders (banks and NBFC), GradRight has become a scalable platform that offers funding opportunities in the form of high potential prequalified students, saving 50% of the cost of acquiring clients. The company has partnerships with private banks, public sector banks, NBFCs and international lenders, which primarily focus on high rate loans.

Serving the students of Telangana

“So far, more than 1,800 Telangana students have signed up on the GradRight platform to fulfill their graduate dreams. Among them, more than 1,000 students aspire to study in the United States, more than 300 students in the United Kingdom, more than 300 students in Canada and more than 200 in countries such as Australia, France and the rest of the world. ‘Europe,’ Ramya Yarlagadda, International Development, said GradRight.

So far, GradRight Telangana alumni have applied for a loan amount of over Rs 550 crore through its FundRight platform. Over Rs 90 crore has already been approved. Students come from all parts of Telangana, including cities such as Nalgonda, Karimnagar, Warangal, and Bhongir. Hyderabad leads the number of Indian students going abroad, with the United States being their dominant destination.

GradRight’s Telangana alumni are represented at Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, New York University, Northeastern University, State University from Arizona, University of Waterloo, University of Toronto, HEC Paris, LSE, University of Manchester and King’s College London, Sista added.

Pan-Indian Perspectives

Ramya said: “Pan-India, GradRight has over 9,500 students enrolled. Enrollments are increasing at a rate of 42 percent month-over-month. Cumulative loan applications on the platform exceed Rs 2,900 crore and increase 48% month-on-month.

Loans worth around Rs.400 crore have been approved and are increasing by 41% month over month. GradRight has partnerships with 12 national colleges / universities, 15 international university partnerships, with the potential to reach 50,000 students seeking international higher education opportunities.

GradRight observes that 70 to 75 percent of Indian students take courses in computer science (37 percent), engineering, and STEM. The United States, Canada and the United Kingdom remain the main destinations. The main loan applications are for study abroad, while some students are also looking for some domestic study opportunities.

Future plans

Sista said, “GradRight plans to launch SelectRight in the coming months, a platform that allows students to find matching universities / colleges that create better returns. Going forward, the company wants the platform to provide each lender with an organized prospect base of student borrowers, unique to their own credit policies, that will help them cut costs and create innovative loan products. for students. There are plans to take GradRight to other developing countries from where students aspire to pursue higher education internationally.

Now you can get handpicked stories from Telangana today to Telegram everyday. Click on the link to subscribe.

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