Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 04:28:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Vote no to the Australian University Union sellout at Western Sydney University https://cec-ugc.org/vote-no-to-the-australian-university-union-sellout-at-western-sydney-university/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:36:20 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/vote-no-to-the-australian-university-union-sellout-at-western-sydney-university/ The Committee for Public Education (CFPE) is urging Western Sydney University staff to vote ‘no’ in the rushed November 28-29 electronic ballot on the company’s pay cut agreement reached with leadership by the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU). Less than a week after it was first published in full on November 10, the deal was […]]]>

The Committee for Public Education (CFPE) is urging Western Sydney University staff to vote ‘no’ in the rushed November 28-29 electronic ballot on the company’s pay cut agreement reached with leadership by the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU).

Less than a week after it was first published in full on November 10, the deal was only endorsed by around 80 NTEU members at a low-attendance union meeting on November 16, in the middle of grading exams.

NTEU Members Meeting at Western Sydney University on June 7, 2022 [Photo: WSWS]

Now, leaving staffers with little time to read and dissect the fine print of the lengthy document – ​​which is 120 pages, 66 clauses and 4 annexes – management and the NTEU have called for an instant vote.

For months since announcing a sketchy three-page “master deal” with management in August, the NTEU has bombarded its members at Western Sydney University (WSU) and nationally with e- emails falsely claiming that the agreement is a “historic VICTORY”. .”

In yet another attempt to mislead university workers and pre-empt the vote at WSU, the union’s latest mass email describes it as a “fantastic victory.” Desperate to strike similar deals elsewhere, the union is touting the deal as a wonderful model for universities across the country to emulate.

Nothing could be further from the truth, as a review of the details of the proposed three-year Enterprise Agreement (EA) shows.

In fact, it fits perfectly with the efforts of the NTEU and all the unions to push through the Albanian Labor government’s demands – set out in its October 25 budget – for at least two more years of real wage cuts, as well as education and health. tax cuts, while giving tax cuts to the wealthy and increasing military spending in preparation for their participation in the wars waged by the United States.

The NTEU hailed the budget, even as it cements a $10 billion cut in university funding over the past decade. According to budget documents, higher education spending is expected to decline by more than 9% in real terms between 2021-22 and 2024-25.

This budget was just the first installment of Labor’s plans, dictated by the money markets, to make the working class pay for the huge public debt, the global economic crisis and the runaway inflation produced by massive donations to the financial elite and big business in the current era. Pandemic of COVID-19, followed by the war launched by the United States against Russia in Ukraine.

The proposed EI would limit wage increases to an average of just 3.5% per year, well below the official inflation rate which is officially expected to hit 8% by the end of 2022. That 3.5% figure % is exactly in accordance with the requirements of the Albanian Government and employers, transmitted through the Reserve Bank.

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Ghana: NLC grants three teachers’ unions one more week to engage government in appointing Dr Nkansah as CEO of GES https://cec-ugc.org/ghana-nlc-grants-three-teachers-unions-one-more-week-to-engage-government-in-appointing-dr-nkansah-as-ceo-of-ges/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 08:05:52 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/ghana-nlc-grants-three-teachers-unions-one-more-week-to-engage-government-in-appointing-dr-nkansah-as-ceo-of-ges/ Three teachers unions, the Ghana National Association of Teachers (GNAT), the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT) and the Coalition of Concerned Teachers (CCT), have pleaded with the National Labor Commission to grant them a week extra to continue their engagement with the government and report to the Commission. The three teachers’ unions declared a […]]]>

Three teachers unions, the Ghana National Association of Teachers (GNAT), the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT) and the Coalition of Concerned Teachers (CCT), have pleaded with the National Labor Commission to grant them a week extra to continue their engagement with the government and report to the Commission.

The three teachers’ unions declared a strike last week because they wanted the government to revoke the appointment of Dr Eric Nkansah as the new chief executive of the GES.

According to the union, the appointment of Dr Eric Nkansah violates the criteria for the appointment of a general manager of the GES because he is a banker and not a teacher.

Teachers’ unions have expressed reluctance to work with the new chief executive of GES and have called on the government to reverse its decision.

The teachers’ unions and the government, represented by the Deputy Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations, Mr Bright Wereko Brobbey, appeared before the Commission last Wednesday at the invitation of the Commission.

The NLC ordered the unions to call off the strike, engage the government on the issue and report back to the Commission on November 16, 2022.

The Chairman of the Commission, Justice Asuman Adu, accepted their request and asked them to report to the Commission on November 23, 2022.

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Dayton mayor to chair education task force https://cec-ugc.org/dayton-mayor-to-chair-education-task-force/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:33:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/dayton-mayor-to-chair-education-task-force/ DAYTON, Ohio — Jeffrey Mims, Jr., has spent the past four decades working to improve Dayton’s education system. Now, as mayor of Dayton, Mims is taking on a new role to help solve academia’s problems nationally. The National League of Cities (NLC) has selected Mims to chair the organization’s Mayoral Education Task Force for the […]]]>

DAYTON, Ohio — Jeffrey Mims, Jr., has spent the past four decades working to improve Dayton’s education system. Now, as mayor of Dayton, Mims is taking on a new role to help solve academia’s problems nationally.

The National League of Cities (NLC) has selected Mims to chair the organization’s Mayoral Education Task Force for the next two years. Within the task force, mayors from across the country discuss and respond to critical education issues.

“As a lifelong educator, I look forward to bringing my experience and passion for education to this national leadership role,” said Mims. “With mayors across the country, we will elevate the essential work of improving educational opportunities for young people in our cities.”


What do you want to know

  • Dayton Mayor Jeffrey Mims, Jr. is the new chair of the National League of Cities Mayors Education Task Force
  • A former teacher, Mims spent 35 years working in Dayton Public Schools
  • The group meets twice a year to discuss and address critical issues in education
  • Local education officials see Mims’ appointment as a way to give a “national voice” to issues in Dayton and other urban districts

Formed in 2012, the Mayoral Education Task Force meets twice a year at NLC events – in March at the city’s congressional conference and in November at the city’s summit. The next City Summit will take place Thursday, November 17 through Saturday, November 19 in Kansas City.

These meetings provide a “small, intimate setting” where honest and constructive conversations take place, according to the NLC’s website.

At their last meeting in March, the group of more than 40 mayors sharing innovations to support young people and students, improve the education system, recruit and retain teachers.

These conversations, led by former president Lily Mei of Fremont, Calif., covered a range of topics. Topics ranged from how to utilize underutilized space in school buildings to working with nonprofit organizations to address housing and basic resource issues.

They also looked at ways to invest in after-school and summer learning programs to support pandemic recovery.

Across the country, math scores have seen their biggest drops ever during the pandemic. Reading scores fell to 1992 levels, the Associated Press reportedand nearly four in 10 eighth graders failed to grasp basic math concepts.

When first meeting, Mims plans to do a lot of listening. He noted a desire to hear from leaders in other successful cities about how to replicate those efforts in Dayton.

“When you look at high performing schools across the country, they’re all doing something quite similar,” Mims added. “High-performing schools, in most cases, come from high-performing communities; affluent communities and where the benefits of a high quality education are clear. So we want to look at ways to follow these approaches to be successful both inside and outside the classroom. »

Provide “equitable educational opportunities” to young people

Clarence Anthony, CEO and executive director of NLC, said the organization invited Mims to serve as president because of his experience in education leadership. He described Mims as having a “passion for providing equitable educational opportunities for young people”.

Mims, who holds a master’s degree in education from Wright State, has worked in Dayton Public Schools for more than 35 years. He taught art to K-8 students to begin his teaching career, and he spent his last seven years in the classroom at Belmont High School.

Beyond his work as a teacher and coach, Mims served as president of the Dayton Education Association for six consecutive terms from 1983 to 1988.

Jeffrey Mims, Mayor of Dayton. Jr. (Photo courtesy of City of Dayton)

He then served as chairman of the Dayton School Board from 2008 to 2011. He represented the Ohio School Board’s Third District for three years before being elected to the Dayton City Commission.

“Ensuring our young people have access to educational opportunities that put them on the path to economic success is an important priority for so many city leaders,” Anthony said. “With his decades of service as an educator, we look forward to leadership (from Mims) to guide these conversations.”

Since joining the Dayton City Commission in 2014, Mims has been committed to strengthening the relationship between City Hall and Dayton Public Schools (DPS). He considers it essential to improve the quality of life of residents.

Mims called improving education an issue that resonates from his “head to his heart.” In addition to being an educator, he is also a parent and grandparent.

His son Cory and daughter LaDawn both attended schools in the DPS system. Cory graduated in 1988 and LaDawn in 1996. Both graduated from college and attended graduate programs, Mims said.

In its most recent report card, DPS received no more than two stars in any of the five categories ranked by the ohio school board. It earned one star each in the Achievement, Graduation, and Early Literacy categories.

Mims doesn’t focus so much on report cards and test scores, as on the fact that only 74.2% of students in the district graduated in four years.

“Our system created more opportunities when my kids were in school than they do now,” he said. “The diversity of programming that they’ve been blessed with is what I’ve pushed for all my life when it comes to education. We have to get back to that.

“It’s about working together”

Will Smith, president of the Dayton Board of Education, said he was very excited about the potential partnerships that could arise from Mims’ role on the task force.

Not just those between the city and the schools, but several other types of organizations — teachers’ unions, community and faith-based organizations, and businesses — to create local solutions to improve student success, Smith said.

“It’s about working together to understand the challenges and then working together to overcome them,” he added. “The more we can work together on these issues, the better off we will be as a city.”

Mims wants to further improve collaborations between City Hall and Dayton Public Schools.  (Casey Weldon/Spectrum News 1)

Mims wants to further improve collaborations between City Hall and Dayton Public Schools. (Casey Weldon/Spectrum News 1)

A key area Mims wants to focus on is improving teacher recruitment and retention. More stringent requirements for teachers and pay rates that don’t follow salary trends in other sectors make it harder to attract and retain the highest quality candidates, he said.

Ohio’s current minimum wage for first-year teachers is $25,950, which federal data suggests that’s 14.4% less than what non-teachers with similar levels of education and experience earn in Ohio.

Therefore, there are nearly 17,000 fewer people working in public education in Ohio now than before the pandemicaccording to data from the Ohio Education Association.

For DPS, the entry-level teacher salary for this school year is $47,391, according to district data. The district-wide average teacher salary is $57,737.

The district continues to work to improve student achievement, said DPS Superintendent Dr. Elizabeth Lolli. This includes filling gaps in education and meeting general student needs. She thinks Mims can be a key advocate for Dayton and its students and teachers on those fronts.

“Having a national voice that understands the challenges facing urban districts can benefit Dayton and other urban districts facing similar issues,” she added.

Through her involvement in the working group, Mims wants to help explore ways to create a holistic approach to education. The goal shouldn’t just be to get kids to graduate, he said, but to help those students succeed in life once they do.

The district’s more than 12,300 students are a long-term investment for Dayton, Mims said. Better graduation rates will not only have a positive effect on the school district, but they will also help increase the median income of the community.

In 2020, the median weekly wage for full-time workers with a high school diploma but no college was $781, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services. That was $162 more than the median weekly income for full-time workers without a high school diploma.

“As an educator, it’s your job to help your students feel they have value and something to offer society,” he said. “Once they graduate, these kids go to college or the military, but then they come back to live in Dayton and continue to contribute to society, to the economy.”


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Education freedom was the big winner in Tuesday’s election https://cec-ugc.org/education-freedom-was-the-big-winner-in-tuesdays-election/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/education-freedom-was-the-big-winner-in-tuesdays-election/ AAs disappointing as the Republicans’ midterm performance was, this year’s election had many upsides beyond the likely loss of the House of Representatives to the Democrats. Among Tuesday’s biggest winners was the issue of school choice, a nonpartisan issue that is really about the quality of education. The victories were big and widely publicized. Tommy […]]]>

AAs disappointing as the Republicans’ midterm performance was, this year’s election had many upsides beyond the likely loss of the House of Representatives to the Democrats. Among Tuesday’s biggest winners was the issue of school choice, a nonpartisan issue that is really about the quality of education.

The victories were big and widely publicized. Tommy Schultz touted last week that his organization, the American Federation for Children, had targeted and defeated about 40 sitting state lawmakers who opposed school choice. It was a good investment of the band’s $9 million.

DESANTIS-BACKED SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES RIDE THE GOVERNOR’S COATTAILS AMID FLORIDA’S RED WAVE

In South Carolina, school choice advocate Ellen Weaver was successfully elected as superintendent of education on a platform for educational freedom. And the wave of school choice wasn’t limited to rural voters in the state, either. In Charleston, candidates backed by the pro-school-choice organization Moms for Liberty won a majority on the local school board.

Group-endorsed candidates have also won multiple Florida school board races, and their victories across the country are counted. Meanwhile, Governor Ron DeSantis’ six godparents also won their school board races.

This is just the beginning of the successes for freedom of education candidates on election night, including successful re-elections for every governor supporting school choice. And those victories were preceded by one of the most exciting outcomes – the welcome failure of leftists to repeal Arizona’s school choice law through a referendum.

For decades, the Liberals have claimed they could solve the education problem with more funding and fewer students in the classroom. And for decades they kept getting more funding and smaller classrooms, and it didn’t solve anything. Student proficiency has not increased despite trillions of dollars invested over the years in all 50 states. As a result, overall, public schools in the United States are abysmal compared to their international peers.

To make matters worse, reading and math fluency rates have plummeted during the pandemic thanks to the simulation of teachers’ unions, which have resisted a return to classroom teaching long after it became clear that COVID-19 was neither a threat to children nor easily spread by them. By refusing to show up for work, they tried to hide behind politically correct rhetoric. As the Chicago Teachers’ Union put it, “the push to reopen schools is rooted in sexism, racism and misogyny.”

Lesson: These are not people you can work with.

The teachers’ unions and the bureaucrats had their chance. They have shown that they will not work on behalf of children, and so parents and voters are increasingly opening up legal avenues to work around them. It’s almost time. The best teachers will find a way to participate in this growing movement. And as a bonus, public schools already suffering from falling enrollment will feel intense pressure to pull themselves together or lose all their enrollment.

Educational freedom, whether in the form of public charter schools or vouchers, offers a way around those who resist necessary reforms to the education system. School choice has provided access to quality education to families who cannot afford private schools themselves. And public charter schools provide better options for students in failing traditional public schools. Educational freedom is the only known solution to the persistently poor quality of public education in cities, and it has improved dire situations where it has been widely introduced – such as in New Orleans and Washington.

There is one more thing. While the issue of school choice has been around for a long time, the topic has never been more prominent than it is today, given the left’s aggressive escalation of culture wars in the age of the pandemic. Liberals try to downplay the reality, but it’s on display everywhere, often because teachers openly admit it via social media. The radicals militarize education and make it a process that bothers children. They set aside reading and basic math in order to indoctrinate children into marginal gender ideology and racial essentialism.

Educational alternatives not only provide children with a better opportunity to learn, but they also help parents avoid having their family values ​​undermined by their own taxes. It’s a win-win.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

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Governor Kathy Hochul, elected for a full term, has 4 years to win in New York https://cec-ugc.org/governor-kathy-hochul-elected-for-a-full-term-has-4-years-to-win-in-new-york/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 19:58:21 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/governor-kathy-hochul-elected-for-a-full-term-has-4-years-to-win-in-new-york/ October 27, 2022 – Syracuse, NY – Governor Kathy Hochul at an event to highlight Micron’s plan to invest in chip manufacturing in upstate New York. (Mike Groll/Office of Governor Kathy Hochul) November 10, 2022 — Now that Kathy Hochul has won the full governorship, what will her full term look like? The governor offered […]]]>

October 27, 2022 – Syracuse, NY – Governor Kathy Hochul at an event to highlight Micron’s plan to invest in chip manufacturing in upstate New York. (Mike Groll/Office of Governor Kathy Hochul)

Now that Kathy Hochul has won the full governorship, what will her full term look like? The governor offered some clues, but not many details.

Hochul in her campaign has focused on protecting abortion rights and pointed to the votes of her opponent, Republican Congressman Lee Zeldin, against certification of the 2020 presidential election. But she did not present a detailed plan of what she will do when she continues to lead the state in 2023.

Hochul, in her victory speech on election night, said she hoped to provide more job opportunities, such as the recently announced Micron Technology deal in Syracuse, which supporters say could create up to to 50,000 new jobs.

“We are going to build a where families can afford to raise their children,” said Hochul, who promised “well-paying jobs” from Long Island and New York and across upstate to Buffalo.

Hochul also said she wants to create more affordable housing and take action to reduce violent crime.

“To have the safety of walking the streets and riding our subways, with no illegal weapons on our streets,” she said.

Hochul and the legislature may have to revisit one of the governor’s signature pieces of legislation. After the United States Supreme Court struck down the 100 years regulating the carrying of concealed weapons, the governor and legislature quickly approved a new law that also sets new requirements for obtaining a pistol license. But a federal judge overturned a key provision of that law.

Zeldin has made the repeal of the State Bail Reform Act a centerpiece of his campaign. The 2019 law ended many forms of cash bail.

Hochul convinced the legislature in April to make changes to the law, adding more crimes to become eligible for bail again and giving judges more discretion over whether to detain a defendant before trial. But Hochul does not support overturning the law.

Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan, who like many towns in New York is facing an increase in gun violence. She said Democrats going forward, including Hochul, need to do more to address public concerns about crime. But she said Republicans gained traction on the issue during campaigns not by coming up with a blanket plan but by trying to scare people away.

“When people peddle fear, it’s really demoralizing and it can suppress the vote,” Sheehan said. “And I think we have to fight back against fear.”

Hochul will have to publish a budget plan in a few months. More will be known about state finances when the Governor’s Budget Office releases its mid-year report. The economic slowdown and inflation could disrupt the plan, which was balanced when it was signed into law last April.

Report under state law was due Oct. 31stbut Hochul, speaking days before the election, said his analysts needed more time to work on it.

“Historically, it came out in November,” Hochul said. “It is really important to get this message across as soon as possible. So we’re working on it. »

The governor has yet to act on a bill passed by the Legislature to impose a two-year moratorium on certain forms of energy-intensive cryptocurrency mining that use repurposed older power plants. for electricity. Environmentalists are asking him to sign it. Liz Moran, with Earthjustice, said the measure would help the state meet its goals of reducing carbon emissions and tackling climate change.

“It’s simple legislation,” Moran said.

The bitcoin industry and some unions are against the moratorium, saying it would prevent New York from creating more jobs in the industry. The governor has so far been coy about whether she will sign or veto the measure.

Hochul didn’t say much about her education plans, though she did approve a budget that increased school aid. During a debate on Spectrum News, she said she supports raising the state cap on the number of charter schools that can operate in New York, a stance that could cause conflict with the state and New York City teachers’ unions. She has not ruled out reimposing health-related mandates on schools if COVID-19 cases escalate or a new, stronger variant of the virus emerges.

And finally, Hochul will have to appoint a new chief justice to the state’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, after Janet DiFiore resigned at the end of the summer. The governor, with four years to go now, has her chance to make her mark on the court, as well as all other aspects of state government.

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West Virginia voters must consider education controls and ballot taxes https://cec-ugc.org/west-virginia-voters-must-consider-education-controls-and-ballot-taxes/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:50:29 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/west-virginia-voters-must-consider-education-controls-and-ballot-taxes/ CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Voters in West Virginia will have the final say on four proposed constitutional amendmentsincluding one that would give control to the Republican-dominated legislature on virtually every aspect of public education. Amendment 4 in Tuesday’s ballot would require the state board of education to submit new rules and regulations to the legislature […]]]>

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Voters in West Virginia will have the final say on four proposed constitutional amendmentsincluding one that would give control to the Republican-dominated legislature on virtually every aspect of public education.

Amendment 4 in Tuesday’s ballot would require the state board of education to submit new rules and regulations to the legislature for final approval each year. Currently, it is the only government agency that is exempt.

GOP lawmakers who support the amendment say the people who make decisions about things like the curriculum, student discipline and teacher training should be accountable to voters. Governor-appointed state school board members confirmed by the West Virginia Senate serve nine-year terms — the longest of any U.S. state — and cannot be easily removed.

The change is opposed by teachers’ unions and other senior education officials who say lawmakers want power over education to advance their policy agendas. Education officials also argue that lawmakers have nothing to do with taking control of public schools when they have consistently failed to help them.

Four years after more than 30,000 school workers went on strike in one of the country’s poorest states, triggering teacher walkouts across the country, many say they are overworked and exhausted.

The vote comes amid a raging nationwide fight over the politicization of schools. Republican leaders in West Virginia have joined politicians elsewhere in pushing to regulate how topics such as race are taught in classrooms and channel public money into alternative education options, including charter schools and voucher programs.

Just this year, the State Board of Education joined a lawsuit against top Republicans over a school choice program — one of the largest in the nation — alleging it is so draining. public school money unconstitutional. The case went to the state Supreme Court, which sided with lawmakers.

Republican Gov. Jim Justice and GOP state legislative leaders also clashed over Amendment 2, which would give state lawmakers the option to eliminate a tax on businesses and stocks as well as the tax on vehicles.

Justice, who wants to reduce — and possibly eliminate — state income tax instead, has toured the state urging voters to reject the proposal. He says passing the amendment could hurt schools, cities and counties and give businesses significant tax breaks.

Leading lawmakers say the amendment will attract economic and business development to the state.

Amendment 1 would prevent state courts from intervening in impeachment proceedings conducted by the legislature. Amendment 3 would remove a provision of the constitution that prohibits churches and religious denominations from incorporation.

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Follow AP election coverage of the 2022 elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

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Editorial: Tests reveal impact of lockdown on US students https://cec-ugc.org/editorial-tests-reveal-impact-of-lockdown-on-us-students/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/editorial-tests-reveal-impact-of-lockdown-on-us-students/ The Wall Street Journal Pandemic shutdowns have been a political mistake for ages and the economic, social and health consequences are still being felt. But the worst catastrophe has been inflicted on American children, as the recent release of the latest national assessment of progress in education shows. The 2022 NAEP test, often called the […]]]>

The Wall Street Journal

Pandemic shutdowns have been a political mistake for ages and the economic, social and health consequences are still being felt. But the worst catastrophe has been inflicted on American children, as the recent release of the latest national assessment of progress in education shows.

The 2022 NAEP test, often called the national report card, revealed a record drop in learning in the United States since the last test in 2019. The tests measured the math and reading skills of fourth and eighth graders, as well as the damage caused by the closure of schools. and online-only education is harsh and depressing.

American schools were not doing very well before the pandemic, but the lack of learning in school made them worse. Eighth graders have dropped eight points in math since 2019, falling to an average of 274 out of a possible 500. Fourth-graders dropped five points, to an average of 236 in 2022. Not a single state or major school district showed better performance in math.

The news is not much better in reading, with the average score of fourth and eighth graders falling by three points. Nationally, only 33% of fourth graders and 31% of eighth graders read at proficiency level or above.

It is difficult to underestimate the human damage represented by these arid statistics. The learning loss is considerable and will take years to recover, if ever. Children who fall behind in reading have difficulty learning other subjects. The numbers also mean that millions of young Americans don’t even know the basics of writing and arithmetic.

The NAEP breaks down scores by states and school districts, though it’s difficult to compare scores by degree of lockdown. Each state has lost ground to some degree, and different state school districts often had different lockdown policies.

NAEP results support school choice. Charter school performance was uneven, but in at least 11 states, charter fourth-graders outperformed their non-charter counterparts in math in 2022, including Alaska (+16 points), Nevada (+12 points) and in North Carolina (+21 points). ). The NAEP says reporting standards were not met for a charter comparison in 22 states.

Catholic schools have tended to stay open during the pandemic and, on average, their fourth and eighth graders have performed better in reading and math than public school students. Department of Defense schools performed even better. Students deserve an escape from schools that cannot prepare them for life and work.

These learning losses did not need to be as severe as they are because school closures did not have to continue as we learned more about the relatively low risk of COVID for children. Sweden kept its schools open and avoided the catastrophic learning loss of the United States

School closures were a political decision, usually influenced by teachers’ unions. The political consequences should now be a backlash against the politicians who let unions close schools for so long.

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Teacher unions need audits as Weingarten opposes Whitmer while students fail: Peter Schweizer https://cec-ugc.org/teacher-unions-need-audits-as-weingarten-opposes-whitmer-while-students-fail-peter-schweizer/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:00:56 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/teacher-unions-need-audits-as-weingarten-opposes-whitmer-while-students-fail-peter-schweizer/ American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, fresh from a trip to Ukraine, recently met with Democratic Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, prompting investigative journalist Peter Schweizer to call for an audit of her organization. Schweizer, who also delved into allegations of personal and corporate corruption within the Biden family, told Fox News that the AFT […]]]>

American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, fresh from a trip to Ukraine, recently met with Democratic Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, prompting investigative journalist Peter Schweizer to call for an audit of her organization.

Schweizer, who also delved into allegations of personal and corporate corruption within the Biden family, told Fox News that the AFT recently contributed tens of millions of dollars to outside political groups as students in the public schools were floundering with plummeting test scores and college studies. aptitude.

On “Jesse Watters Primetime,” host Jesse Watters noted that Weingarten recently traveled to Ukraine to visit schools affected by the Russian invasion and puzzled high-profile midterm Democrats.

“You know who’s on our side? You know who the problem solver is? Governor Whitmer,” Weingarten shouted from the stage at a recent event in Michigan.

FLORIDA REPORTED CHINESE LAND PURCHASE FOR PRIMATE TESTING WILL NOT END WELL, EXPERT SAYS

Peter Schweizer appears on Fox News.
(FoxNews)

“And then on the other side, who stirs up resentment, anger and fear – who uses children as political pawns?” she asked.

Weingarten also joined first lady Jill Biden this week in defending a host of Pittsburgh Democrats, saying GOP candidates would torpedo Social Security and ban abortion.

In response, Schweizer said teachers’ unions have always tended to be “center-left,” but they have also become more political and less interested in their stated goal of representing educators.

“They went from being a liberal, kind of ‘Walter Mondale liberals’ to being extremely left-wing,” he said. “So you have these teachers’ unions, for example, that are pouring millions of dollars into groups that are lobbying for Defund the Police. How does that help education? How does that help teachers? That’s not the case. It makes their lives more difficult.”

DOUBLE INFLATION CRISIS? : PROFESSOR SAYS EMBELLISHED GRADES FAIL AMERICAN STUDENTS

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, speaks at the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) Legislative and Popular Mobilization Conference in Washington, DC, U.S., Monday, February 10, 2020. The President Donald Trump released his annual budget Monday, proposing deep cuts to social programs but increases to defense spending and entitlements that would push gross federal debt above $30 trillion over the next decade .  Photographer: Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, speaks at the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) Legislative and Popular Mobilization Conference in Washington, DC, U.S., Monday, February 10, 2020. The President Donald Trump released his annual budget Monday, proposing deep cuts to social programs but increases to defense spending and entitlements that would push gross federal debt above $30 trillion over the next decade . Photographer: Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/Bloomberg via Getty Images
(Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

“So you’ve really seen the leadership of the union go off the rails. And I think it’s time there was accountability. Members need to start paying attention to the leadership that is actually spending the money on this…he there must be an Audit.”

Schweizer noted that his organization, the Government Accountability Institute, is a nonprofit like many unions.

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“When you set up a nonprofit, you state what your mission objective is. That’s why you give tax-exempt status, for example,” he said, adding that just as his GAI could not suddenly shift from surveillance journalism to “horticulture”, teachers’ unions cannot expressly become political outfits.

He said the Internal Revenue Service headed by Trump-appointed Charles Rettig should be “all over” Weingarten and other teachers’ unions when it comes to their tax status.

However, he said he was “not holding his breath” for Rettig’s agency to take action.

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How a Maryland “Moms for Liberty” Group Became Our Country’s Culture War Leader https://cec-ugc.org/how-a-maryland-moms-for-liberty-group-became-our-countrys-culture-war-leader/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:37:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/how-a-maryland-moms-for-liberty-group-became-our-countrys-culture-war-leader/ Mno changes have occurred in this country due to the COVID-19 pandemic. What started as the survival of a deadly virus has turned into a revelation of the overreach of aggressive left-wing government, elitist superiority and double standards. Then came the unintended consequence of remote learning – the discovery of the extent of left-wing brainwashing […]]]>

Mno changes have occurred in this country due to the COVID-19 pandemic. What started as the survival of a deadly virus has turned into a revelation of the overreach of aggressive left-wing government, elitist superiority and double standards. Then came the unintended consequence of remote learning – the discovery of the extent of left-wing brainwashing in our nation’s public schools.

As outraged parents fought for change, organizations sprang up across the country to resist such indoctrination. One of the most effective organizations in the country was Moms for Freedom. In Carroll County, Maryland, mothers created a chapter that has become the latest example of parental efforts to be a beacon of hope and a catalyst for change.

The organization’s website features a quote from John Adams, founding father and second president of the United States. “Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom,” the quote reads. It dates back to the 18th century, but Adams’ sacred words ring true in 2022. It’s a sentiment many need to remember – advice that’s driving the left crazy.

The spirit of Adams’ quote is exemplified by Carroll County Chapter President Kit Hart.

“I felt the call to start a chapter of Moms for Liberty when it became clear that bureaucrats were making decisions for my children that I was rejecting,” she told me. “The COVID policies that school boards and other jurisdictions imposed on us were contrary to the educational flourishing of our children. Virtual school was a failure, playgrounds were covered in gruesome duct tape and children had to wear a piece of cloth over their face while they learned to read and communicate.”

Carroll County Moms for Liberty Chair, Kit Hart

Moms for Freedom

Hart highlighted a critical concern about virtual education. While the left assured parents of the need and benefits of virtual schooling, the reality of the situation was dire. Recent national standardized test results of the National Education Progress Assessment found a significant decline in student test scores between 2019 and 2022, mostly seen as the result of remote learning. When it comes to raising children, the Liberals, Democrats, and teachers’ unions were all wrong.

“Common sense politics were thrown out, and I couldn’t just sit back and allow people who had never even met my children to make decisions that I knew were counter-intuitive and wrong,” Hart said. . “I was drawn to the organization for its advocacy for our rights as parents, and the firm but cheerful way in which its leaders act. The fight against masks was the first battle in this war on childhood , and it prepared us for the most deranged battle against any shred of innocence.”

Mask and vaccine mandates were the starting point for many mothers in Moms for Liberty. Another chapter member, Shelly Leigh, also joined because of masks in schools. Then, like many other mothers, she became aware of the toxic school programs the children were subjected to.

“At first it was the mask and vaccine mandates…then came the gender theory program,” Leigh told me. “I don’t believe that’s something the school should be teaching. I do have empathy for people in the LGBTQ community, but that doesn’t belong in the classroom.”

Moms for Liberty of Carroll County recently celebrated its first anniversary. Even at this event, they focused on their goals and how they would accomplish them. Their leaders have stressed the importance of volunteering at the polls, helping to improve the community, fighting against “woke” school curricula, and helping elect political candidates who adhere to their values, among other things. The chapter is like a well-oiled machine.

The Mothers Group is a dynamic force and continues to grow. They organized food and toy drives for people in need in their communities. They also held a Bus Driving Appreciation Day to thank the people who drive many of their children to school. A year into his journey to help Carroll County make a difference, Hart reflected on the group’s accomplishments.

“We rallied and spoke out at school board meetings against mandatory masking at the county and state level,” Hart told me. “We were also successful in gaining support for a flag policy consistent with the county’s political neutrality policy, which states that no flags other than state, county, American, or lesson-relevant flags shall can be displayed in classrooms.”

Kit Hart, Shelly Leigh and all the mothers of the Carroll County Chapter have worked diligently to challenge the attacks of the left on our culture. They stand for honest and open speech, hold monthly meetings and mobilize to be the change they want to see in society. They host renowned speakers and enthusiastically embrace education and knowledge sharing on various topics.

From government overreach during the pandemic, to the discovery of blatantly inappropriate books in school libraries, to opposing left-wing brainwashing in public schools, they have truly become frontline culture warriors. and beacons of freedom in these perilous times. John Adams’ era had the Sons of Liberty, who championed American ideals and virtues; today we have moms for freedom.

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O’Brien Atkinson: Pittman honored his public safety commitments https://cec-ugc.org/obrien-atkinson-pittman-honored-his-public-safety-commitments/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/obrien-atkinson-pittman-honored-his-public-safety-commitments/ Steuart Pittman has once again won the approval of our county’s police, fire and teachers’ unions. Continued progress and the policies adopted by the Pittman administration will greatly benefit our county, its employees and its residents. Before Pittman took office, the mantra of “doing more with less” and enacting cuts to county government was not […]]]>

Steuart Pittman has once again won the approval of our county’s police, fire and teachers’ unions. Continued progress and the policies adopted by the Pittman administration will greatly benefit our county, its employees and its residents.

Before Pittman took office, the mantra of “doing more with less” and enacting cuts to county government was not working. While previous administrations cut police funding, the Pittman County Executive has consistently improved funding for our police department. County facilities were crumbling and the only thing lower than our dismal staffing level was our morale.

Pittman has invested in our police force while keeping our tax rates among the lowest in the state. He promised us four years ago that he would, and he did.

Public polls have shown that our citizens want more police officers and Pittman continues to hire officers by making compensation more competitive and improving police facilities, training and equipment. He increased the actual numbers unlike the last administration. His predecessor added new positions and claimed to increase manpower, but never hired the officers to fill them. It was misleading and dangerous. There were only 672 sworn police officers on the force when Pittman took office. If you include the recruits who were at the academy, training to become police officers, the number was 692. Our authorized strength at the time was 745, and including the 20 academy recruits, we had 53 positions. vacant.

By April of last year, we had reached 773 agents. That’s 101 new sworn police officers. Our department hired a record number of police officers under the Pittman administration in 2019 and 2020 and we have achieved record staffing levels. We still lack the manpower we need, but we are making great progress.

In nearly every forum, Pittman reminds people of his core belief: “Public safety is the most sacred obligation of government.” In his final county budget speech, he said, “Instead of continuing the last administration’s efforts to weaken the police, fire and custody unions, we listened to them, resolved grievances with them and found common ground. Instead of paying lawyers to represent us in arbitration, we pay first responders a fair wage and improve conditions so they can improve service. It saves lives. Despite the fact that it becomes more difficult every day to recruit and retain good officers, Pittman has demonstrated his dedication to continuing the positive momentum we have to improve our public safety services.

The Pittman administration created a positive new culture in county government. It focuses on improving services provided to residents by improving relations with the county workforce. He surrounded himself with people who work tirelessly and fearlessly to get things done. When problems arise, we solve them together. Department heads, like our Chief of Police, Amal Awad, have been carefully selected for their ability to work collaboratively, communicate professionally, and find common ground and mutually beneficial solutions to the complex issues we face. faced every day. We appreciate the positive new direction of the county and our police department under Pittman’s leadership.

Your county’s police force is better staffed, better trained and better equipped than it was four years ago. We know that with Pittman in power, we can say the same in four years. Simply put, our Fraternal Order of Police supports Steuart Pittman because Steuart Pittman supports our county police officers.

Cpl. O’Brien Atkinson is president of the local Fraternal Order of Police Lodge.

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