Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 22:18:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Former CDC director hits back at agency criticism https://cec-ugc.org/former-cdc-director-hits-back-at-agency-criticism/ https://cec-ugc.org/former-cdc-director-hits-back-at-agency-criticism/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 22:01:43 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/former-cdc-director-hits-back-at-agency-criticism/ Former CDC Director William “Bill” Foege, MD, MPH, slammed an unnamed Republican lawmaker and an unnamed Trump administration official for casting doubt on the agency during an address at the ‘A virtual celebration of the 70th anniversary of the agency’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) on Friday. Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) previously tore the agency apart […]]]>


Former CDC Director William “Bill” Foege, MD, MPH, slammed an unnamed Republican lawmaker and an unnamed Trump administration official for casting doubt on the agency during an address at the ‘A virtual celebration of the 70th anniversary of the agency’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) on Friday.

Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine) previously tore the agency apart during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on May 11, saying she had lost respect for the CDC. While in the past, she viewed agency advice as the “gold standard” that she no longer made, she said.

“It pains me very much to see a senator say that she no longer trusts the CDC,” Foege said.

Collins argued that the agency bowed to pressure from teachers’ unions over guidelines to reopen its schools and overestimated the risk of outside transmission of COVID-19 in its reports, which ultimately undermined public confidence and her.

Foege cited the irony of “a politician in 2021, telling us who to trust”, before highlighting another official, this time a “public health member of the White House task force” , who also said “she didn’t trust what came from CDC.”

Although he did not give a name, Deborah Birx, MD, was the former White House coronavirus response coordinator under the Trump administration. She reportedly said in May 2020: “There is nothing in the CDC that I can trust.”

Even when lashing out at the CDC’s critics, Foege said those concerns made him think again and forced him to take another look at the agency and “now belatedly … I wonder if we need the brakes. and counterweight in public health “.

He specified that such a system should be put in place internally and “no [be] something imposed from the outside. We need to re-establish the CDC as the gold standard, not by saying we are the gold standard, but by continuing to prove it every day … and the reputation will return. “

Foege also admitted that he and “people like me” took some of the blame for the mistakes of the past year.

“I kept thinking that the White House task force is going to see the error of what they are doing and they are going to change, because it has always happened in the past, but they did not done. It should not have happened, “he said of the escalating pandemic and hundreds of thousands of deaths in the United States

“By the time I spoke, it was too late,” Foege noted. “Public health has been challenged by political bullies, and we have not responded.”

Foege called for training public health workers in political science and encouraging them to enter politics, “until we have as many public health professionals as we have lawyers in Congress.”

In addition to taking back the reins of public health at the national level, Foege called on the CDC to restore its leadership role in the global community. He has the opportunity to do so right now by becoming a leader in global immunization efforts, Foege said.

“[T]imagine what could happen if the United States ran a program to vaccinate a billion people in 100 days, ”he suggested.

  • Shannon Firth has worked on health policy as a correspondent for MedPage Today in Washington since 2014. She is also a member of the site’s Enterprise & Investigative Reporting team. To pursue





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Unions strive to ‘defuse’ protests in Colombia https://cec-ugc.org/unions-strive-to-defuse-protests-in-colombia/ https://cec-ugc.org/unions-strive-to-defuse-protests-in-colombia/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 01:12:27 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/unions-strive-to-defuse-protests-in-colombia/ On Wednesday, another “national strike” took place in Colombia, involving protests across the country and partial closures of workplaces, small businesses and public transport. It was the 35th day of protests and continued roadblocks against social inequalities and mismanagement of the pandemic by the far-right government of President Iván Duque. Despite the continued activism of […]]]>


On Wednesday, another “national strike” took place in Colombia, involving protests across the country and partial closures of workplaces, small businesses and public transport. It was the 35th day of protests and continued roadblocks against social inequalities and mismanagement of the pandemic by the far-right government of President Iván Duque.

Despite the continued activism of the protests, which saw the participation of millions of people, the so-called National Strike Committee led by the main unions is working to shut them down.

Official shooting in civilian clothes at demonstrators in Cali (Twitter, Comisión de Justicia y Paz).

On Tuesday, the committee called for a “de-escalation” of roadblocks, including the lifting of 40 “resistance points”. During a press conference, the head of the teachers’ union Fecode, Nelson Alarcón, explained that with this de-escalation, “the national government today has no excuse not to sign the pre-agreements”.

The committee’s demands include a police reorganization, free tuition for the poorest college students and a basic income during the pandemic. By themselves, these measures would not even begin to cope with the enormous social crisis and anger towards the repressive forces behind the protests; however, these “pre-agreements” have been broken by Duque after every wave of mass protests since 2018.

“Normalcy in Colombia is terrorizing because people are hungry, thousands of young people are unemployed,” said Pipe, an activist who manned roadblocks in Cali, the epicenter of the protests. Efe. “While the president talks about dialogue during the day, in his favorite networks, people go out at night in fancy cars to shoot kids down.”

While working hand in hand with the discredited unions, whose “de-escalation” only serves to isolate remaining blockages and facilitate massacres, the Colombian ruling class and US imperialism are stepping up repression.

In a brief report, the NGO Commission for Justice and Peace explains that on Tuesday, protesters at roadblocks were shot dead by plainclothes paramilitary forces at 2 p.m. and then by motorcycle police at 3 p.m. At 4:30 p.m., men in unmarked vehicles took pictures of the protesters as military helicopters continued to intimidate them over their heads.





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Jay Ambrose: Charter schools are an answer to educational needs | Editorial https://cec-ugc.org/jay-ambrose-charter-schools-are-an-answer-to-educational-needs-editorial/ https://cec-ugc.org/jay-ambrose-charter-schools-are-an-answer-to-educational-needs-editorial/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/jay-ambrose-charter-schools-are-an-answer-to-educational-needs-editorial/ Jay Ambrose Tribune News Service Group together the current range of America’s devastating problems, pick the most important, and one of them is bound to be public education that does not educate, at least not adequately. There is an answer to what the standardized tests tell us, a simple answer, one that the majority of […]]]>


Jay Ambrose Tribune News Service

Group together the current range of America’s devastating problems, pick the most important, and one of them is bound to be public education that does not educate, at least not adequately. There is an answer to what the standardized tests tell us, a simple answer, one that the majority of black Americans agree with, but teachers’ unions do not.

It’s more relying on wonderfully innovative charter schools, which also happen to be public schools. Charter schools are paid by taxes and are free to students. A main objective is to experiment with different teaching techniques, to find improved teaching methods. A student does not need to have a brilliant record to be accepted as admission is by individual choice or, if applications outnumber openings, by lottery.

For a negative outlook on all of this, turn to the teacher unions and the deferential White Democrats. For the facts and the logic, turn to the incredible Thomas Sowell.

A Harlem child and Harvard student before going to graduate school and becoming an economist, columnist, and think tank member, Sowell has a clear, logical, and realistic view of the world. The bottom line is that he does not play intellectual games like the unions do by comparing the test scores of these charter schools teaching students from disadvantaged families with those in public schools teaching the offspring of the rich and the very educated.

People also read …

Instead, he goes to a place like New York City where it is possible to compare charter and public school students with the same socio-economic backgrounds, living in the same neighborhood and possibly even learning in the same buildings. Charter schools are winning big.

Charter schools, please understand, don’t come out of nowhere. Sponsored by private groups, they are vetted by school authorities before being allowed to settle in, and can be terminated if they fail. When a student moves from a public school to a charter school, the money goes with it, but so do the costs. Overall, charter schools do not have unions, and for those who adore these politically capable organizations, it might be worth considering the enormous cost of their unscientific resistance to in-person teaching during the crisis. of COVID-19. Millions of young minds have been hit hard.

In his book “Charter Schools and Their Enemies,” Sowell discusses all kinds of cultural issues that can cause some students to perform worse than others, and then states that this is no excuse for that the public schools say there is nothing they can do about it. . Education is a great provider. If not always, it can be overcome over and over again, providing life opportunities that are hard to come by any other way.

Sowell is not saying that all charter schools are great or that all public schools fail, but that we have a charter school network model in New York that should be seen as a crucial way to solve one of the most urgent problems of our country. His book competes more successfully with the puzzling changes in education being promoted by progressives right now even though President Barack Obama also believed in charter schools. As Sowell notes, it’s far more important for students to become good at English and math than it is to practice grief or absorb leftist propaganda. What’s particularly frightening are states that want to put numerical limits on charter schools or relax disciplinary rules that lead to better learning environments.

Develop charter schools, spread their best techniques and see what happens.

Jay Ambrose is a columnist for Tribune News Service. Send an email to speaktojay@aol.com.



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Students will be offered 100 million hours of lessons as part of the Covid catch-up plan | Education https://cec-ugc.org/students-will-be-offered-100-million-hours-of-lessons-as-part-of-the-covid-catch-up-plan-education/ https://cec-ugc.org/students-will-be-offered-100-million-hours-of-lessons-as-part-of-the-covid-catch-up-plan-education/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 04:13:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/students-will-be-offered-100-million-hours-of-lessons-as-part-of-the-covid-catch-up-plan-education/ Students will be offered an additional 100 million hours of lessons under the post-pandemic catch-up plans unveiled today – but the government was immediately criticized for the £ 1.4 billion scheme, with its own warning from the tsar “more will be needed”. After months of unprecedented school closures, £ 1.4 billion will be spent on […]]]>



Students will be offered an additional 100 million hours of lessons under the post-pandemic catch-up plans unveiled today – but the government was immediately criticized for the £ 1.4 billion scheme, with its own warning from the tsar “more will be needed”.

After months of unprecedented school closures, £ 1.4 billion will be spent on up to 6 million sets of 15-hour tutoring courses for underprivileged students as well as an expansion of an existing fund for helping 16 to 19 year-olds with subjects such as English and math, the Department of Education (DfE) said.

There is also provision for additional training and support for teachers, as well as funding to allow some grade 13 students to repeat their last year if it is severely affected by the pandemic.

He gave no immediate verdict on the plans mentioned to extend school days by 30 minutes. This idea, criticized as being misplaced by some teachers’ unions, will be the subject of a separate examination to be made later in the year.

On the new spending plans, there was almost unanimity among the unions that the sums committed were insufficient, the National Education Union qualifying them as “insufficient and incomplete”.

Perhaps even more damaging for ministers, the announced spending is around a tenth of the £ 15bn total reportedly recommended by Sir Kevan Collins, who was appointed in February by Downing Street as recovery commissioner of education responsible for leading efforts to compensate for the damage caused by the coronavirus pandemic, in particular to students from the most disadvantaged backgrounds.

The official announcement of the new plan contained commendable quotes from Education Secretary Gavin Williamson and Prime Minister Boris Johnson who said it “should give parents confidence” – but the quote Collins posted was more circumspect.

Ensuring that all students catch up “will require a sustained and comprehensive support program,” said Collins, and while the latest announcement would help many children and teachers, “more will be needed to meet the scale of the challenge. “.

Government sources point out that the announced total for all catch-up work over the past 12 months is now closer to £ 3 billion and that ministers have pledged to implement a long-term plan for the process.

Mary Bousted, co-secretary general of the National Education Union, said: “Rarely has so much been promised and so little delivered. The pledged amount shows that the government “does not understand, nor appreciate, the essential foundations laid by education for the economic recovery of the country,” she added.

The National Association of School Principals (NAHT) called the investment “paltry” compared to plans in other countries and the amount spent to support businesses.

“After weeks of big talk and creating expectations for the resumption of education, this announcement only confirms the government’s lack of ambition in education. It’s a wet firecracker, ”said Paul Whiteman, NAHT general secretary. “Recouping education cannot be done on the cheap.”

The Association of School and College Leaders condemned what it called “a hugely disappointing announcement that is dropping children and schools across the country at a time when the government needs to step up and demonstrate its commitment to education.” Ideas to extend the school day could prove controversial if implemented, as reportedly recommended in Collins’ report to ministers. Polls have shown it is not very popular with parents, while unions have warned of the impact on family time and extracurricular activities.

Of the government’s mentoring plans, an additional £ 218million will go to the National Mentorship Program, which provides external support, with £ 222million for mentoring 16-19 year olds.

The biggest share, £ 579million, will be for ‘local tutoring’ – school services using new or existing staff. This will cover around 75% of the total costs, with schools contributing the rest. Over the next academic years, the proportion paid by schools will increase so that they end up covering most of the tuition fees, according to the DfE statement.

At the same time, Labor unveiled its party plan for resuming education, pledging an additional £ 14.7 billion over the next two years to ensure pupils catch up and narrow further achievement gaps created by the disturbance.

Particularly focused on the well-being of students after the pandemic, the money would be spent in areas such as additional breakfast clubs and activities for children, giving them more time to socialize and better support in matters. mental health.

The Labor plan would commit to offering small group tutoring for any child who needs it, more support for teachers, a ‘return to education bonus’ to ensure more spending for the most troubled children and extended free school meals during all holidays.

Shadow Education Secretary Kate Green contrasted what she called Labor’s “bold plan” with government commitments.

Speaking of the government’s plan, Green said, “This announcement mocks the Prime Minister’s claim that education is a priority. His own education recovery commissioner almost said that plan was insufficient. Sir Kevan Collins told ministers 10 times that level of investment is needed to help children recover. “

In a statement released with the plans, Johnson said: “Young people have sacrificed so much over the past year and as we recover from the pandemic we need to make sure that no child is left behind.

“This next step in our long-term catch-up plan should give parents confidence that we will do all we can to support children who have fallen behind and that every child will have the skills and knowledge they need to achieve. its potential. “



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It’s time to break the government’s monopoly on public education https://cec-ugc.org/its-time-to-break-the-governments-monopoly-on-public-education/ https://cec-ugc.org/its-time-to-break-the-governments-monopoly-on-public-education/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/its-time-to-break-the-governments-monopoly-on-public-education/ The behavior of teacher unions and public school bureaucracies across much of the country has been a disgrace. Time and time again, they unnecessarily kept children out of the classroom. Their unacceptable actions will, over time, lead to drastic changes in the way American children are educated. The traditional public school system will follow the […]]]>


The behavior of teacher unions and public school bureaucracies across much of the country has been a disgrace. Time and time again, they unnecessarily kept children out of the classroom. Their unacceptable actions will, over time, lead to drastic changes in the way American children are educated. The traditional public school system will follow the path of landlines, fax machines and typewriters.

A year ago, it was clear that there was no scientific reason not to resume classroom teaching, as children are highly unlikely to contract or transmit Covid-19. Experience in Europe, Japan and elsewhere has shown that schools – taking the necessary precautions – can reopen safely.

The damage caused by keeping children at home, in terms of lost learning, depression and reduced family income due to parents having to stay at home to care for children, has vastly exceeded all damage caused by Covid-19. Yet union bosses continued to say no to classroom instruction, shaking politicians for more concessions and more money.

Shamefully, President Biden and many local politicians have capitulated. Obviously, they really don’t care about kids. This appalling behavior will have profound repercussions, both short and long term.

Millions of parents are shocked and come to the sad conclusion that the current public school system – in far too many cases – has abandoned them and their offspring. Videos of teachers disparaging parents or going on vacation while children were cared for at home reinforced this astonishing perception of selfishness and indifference.

In addition, there is a growing realization that many schools, before Covid, were not doing a good job of educating students, as test results sadly demonstrated. Too often the response has been to lower the curriculum or simply move children to the next grade, even when they are not qualified.

This grim reality is leading to growing support for a more authentic school choice. More than 30 states are creating or developing educational choice programs. Florida has just expanded its school voucher program. Many states use scholarship programs funded by income tax credits to allow parents to escape the government’s monopoly on public education. Oklahoma, for example, has just overcome fierce union opposition and has dramatically expanded its private school scholarship program, and the reformers there will push for a massive expansion next year.

A more ambitious initiative is to have school funds follow the child instead of being limited to a specific school, regardless of its severity. The tool for this would be K-12 Education Savings Accounts (CES). These taxpayer-funded accounts would allow eligible parents to use the money not only to send their child to a private school, but also to pay for private lessons, online courses and textbooks. The dollars would follow the child, not the school. In other words, if you send a child to a non-public school, the per pupil costs paid by the government would be transferred from the public school to the alternative school.

West Virginia has the largest ESA program in the country – over 90% of students will be eligible when the program goes into effect in July 2022, breaking the government’s monopoly on education in that state. And Kentucky lawmakers have overturned their governor’s veto on an ambitious ESA project. Obviously, the ESA movement is gaining momentum.

There are also privately funded programs, such as the Children’s Scholarship Fund, for children from low-income households.

The fact that most educational opportunities for children are determined by the zip code they live in is an American scandal.

It won’t happen overnight, but the nefarious and short-sighted actions of unions will lead to profound change – and American children will be the winners.



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Ontario Reports 916 New COVID-19 Cases, The Fewest Since Mid-February https://cec-ugc.org/ontario-reports-916-new-covid-19-cases-the-fewest-since-mid-february/ https://cec-ugc.org/ontario-reports-916-new-covid-19-cases-the-fewest-since-mid-february/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 16:01:03 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/ontario-reports-916-new-covid-19-cases-the-fewest-since-mid-february/ Ontario reported 916 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, the least in a single day since mid-February, as Ontario Premier Doug Ford said an announcement on the rest of the school year would come the “next day or two”. Speaking at Queen’s Park this morning, Ford said his government was considering responses to a letter […]]]>


Ontario reported 916 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, the least in a single day since mid-February, as Ontario Premier Doug Ford said an announcement on the rest of the school year would come the “next day or two”.

Speaking at Queen’s Park this morning, Ford said his government was considering responses to a letter sent last Thursday that sought advice from a range of expert groups, public health officials, teachers’ unions and other stakeholders.

The letter pointed out that no firm consensus had emerged on whether to reopen the province’s school for several weeks in June and sought advice on a number of key issues, including the risks posed by the variants. of concern from COVID-19.

Ford’s comments come as his government is set to table a motion that would see a new senior public health official in the province.

Health Minister Christine Elliott said over the weekend that the province is preparing to replace Dr. David Williams, Ontario’s chief medical officer, with Dr. Kieran Moore.

Williams was due to retire in September, after his original tenure was extended amid the pandemic, but his last day was extended by several months.

Moore is currently the top doctor in the Kingston area public health unit and is expected to succeed Williams on June 26.

Moore will begin working with Williams on June 7 to ensure a smooth transition, the government said.

Today’s additional cases are the fewest confirmed in a single day in Ontario since February 17.

The labs performed 18,226 tests and Public Health Ontario recorded a 4.3% positivity rate, the lowest reported on a Monday since March 15.

The seven-day daily case average fell to 1,078.

Yesterday, 617 patients with COVID-related illnesses were being treated in intensive care units. Of these, 382, ​​or about 62%, needed a ventilator to breathe. According to Critical Care Services Ontario, the median stay of COVID-19 patients in intensive care is approximately 21.5 days.

The Ministry of Health also recorded the deaths of 13 other people with COVID-19, bringing the official toll to 8,757. The seven-day average of deaths stands at just over 19.

Meanwhile, public health units collectively administered an additional 97,747 doses of the vaccine yesterday. More than 8.3 million Ontarians, or about 56.8% of the province’s total population, have now received at least one dose.



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Distance learning should end with pandemic, says Quebec union https://cec-ugc.org/distance-learning-should-end-with-pandemic-says-quebec-union/ https://cec-ugc.org/distance-learning-should-end-with-pandemic-says-quebec-union/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 17:31:50 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/distance-learning-should-end-with-pandemic-says-quebec-union/ Breadcrumb Links Quebec New Local News The union is calling on Education Minister Jean-François Roberge to set clear guidelines for when lessons can be moved away – and snowy days don’t count. Author of the article: Canadian press Felix Desjardins Distance learning must remain an exceptional practice, affirms the FPEP-CSQ. Photo by JAIME REINA /AFP […]]]>


The union is calling on Education Minister Jean-François Roberge to set clear guidelines for when lessons can be moved away – and snowy days don’t count.

Content of the article

Distance learning should never be promoted after the end of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a teachers’ union, as it has a major impact on students and teachers.

This conclusion is drawn from a study by the Federation of Private Education Personnel (FPEP), affiliated with the Centrale des unions du Québec (CSQ).

In a report released on Sunday, the union highlights the negative consequences of online learning for students and school staff, including less retention of material by students, erosion of student-teacher relationships and overload. of teachers’ work.

“For us, this practice must remain exceptional”, declared the vice-president of the FPEP-CSQ, Marie-Josée Dallaire, during an online press conference.

Dallaire denounced the desire of some institutions to standardize distance learning, a practice that she said could harm students and staff.

“Snowstorms or competitions that take place on a school day are not exceptional circumstances that justify disrupting the planning and pedagogy of teachers,” she said.

The FPEP-CSQ asks the Minister of Education, Jean-François Roberge, to establish clear guidelines for distance learning as of the next school year and not to “give in to the many pretexts” that could justify its use. .

The FPEP study, conducted among 17 affiliated unions, included interviews with teaching and support staff.



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San Francisco Teachers Union Becomes First to Pass BDS Resolution | The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com | JNS News Service | 19 Sivan 5781 – May 30, 2021 https://cec-ugc.org/san-francisco-teachers-union-becomes-first-to-pass-bds-resolution-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-jns-news-service-19-sivan-5781-may-30-2021/ https://cec-ugc.org/san-francisco-teachers-union-becomes-first-to-pass-bds-resolution-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-jns-news-service-19-sivan-5781-may-30-2021/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 21:04:26 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/san-francisco-teachers-union-becomes-first-to-pass-bds-resolution-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-jns-news-service-19-sivan-5781-may-30-2021/ Photo credit: Pixabay San Francisco San Francisco School District teachers’ union voted in favor of a resolution on May 19 to boycott Israel United Educators of San Francisco (UESF), which is affiliated with the largest federation of unions in the United States, the AFL-CIO, is the first K-12 union of public school teachers in America […]]]>


Photo credit: Pixabay

San Francisco

San Francisco School District teachers’ union voted in favor of a resolution on May 19 to boycott Israel

United Educators of San Francisco (UESF), which is affiliated with the largest federation of unions in the United States, the AFL-CIO, is the first K-12 union of public school teachers in America to officially support the BDS. It is also the first time since 2016 that an American union has officially supported the BDS movement, according to Jewish News from Northern California.

The final sentence of the resolution calls on the union to support BDS and earlier calls on the Biden administration to stop aid to Israel. He denounces the “forced displacement and house demolitions” of Palestinians by Israel and accuses the Jewish state of being “a regime of legalized racial discrimination”.

“As public school educators in the United States of America, we have a special responsibility to stand in solidarity with the Palestinian people because of the $ 3.8 billion a year that the U.S. government gives to Israel, thus using directly our taxes to finance apartheid. and war crimes, ”says the resolution.

Jewish Community Relations Council executive director Tyler Gregory called the legislation “factually inaccurate” and “inflammatory.”

“Rather than supporting all students whose families could be affected by the conflict – Israelis, Palestinians, Jews and Arabs – this vote will help make Jewish students feel unsafe and unwelcome in public schools in San Francisco.” , did he declare. “We are determined to fight for just and inclusive policies to support Jews and other marginalized communities in public education.

The ESUF adopted the resolution with 23 votes in favor, 6 against and 7 abstentions, reported Jewish News from Northern California.



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Chicago teachers’ union reached tentative deal to reopen public schools https://cec-ugc.org/chicago-teachers-union-reached-tentative-deal-to-reopen-public-schools/ https://cec-ugc.org/chicago-teachers-union-reached-tentative-deal-to-reopen-public-schools/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 03:13:45 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/chicago-teachers-union-reached-tentative-deal-to-reopen-public-schools/ Chicago (AP) – Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Sunday touted a preliminary deal with teacher unions on the COVID-19 safety protocol, saying she could avoid strikes in the states’ third-largest school district -United. I did. Some students will be able to gradually reopen the school each year and return to class immediately on Thursday. The […]]]>


Chicago (AP) – Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Sunday touted a preliminary deal with teacher unions on the COVID-19 safety protocol, saying she could avoid strikes in the states’ third-largest school district -United. I did.

Some students will be able to gradually reopen the school each year and return to class immediately on Thursday. The city has also agreed to vaccinate 1,500 teachers and employees every week at a dedicated vaccination center in Chicago public schools. Potential deals still require Chicago Teachers Union approval, but also include indicators that cause school closures when cases increase.

Unions and districts Fighting for months Discussions over plan to gradually reopen student district of around 340,000 people Collapsed in recent days Over issues such as vaccination Lightfoot and CPS actors Threatened to lock down educators The union said this would lead to a second strike in less than two years.

On Sunday, the mayor of the first term, visibly upset at a recent press conference, laughed.

“The deal was not just about making everyone in the school community feel safe, but also making them feel safe,” Wrightfoot said, calling the past 11 months a “whirlwind in the world”. ‘city scale’. called.

She called it a “tentative deal,” but the union called it a proposal that needed further consideration.

CTU tweeted Sunday that “there is no agreement with Chicago public schools yet.” “We will continue the democratic baseline review process throughout the day until the deal is reached.”

It is not known when the union will start voting. The Union Membership Board must decide whether or not to send proposals to approximately 25,000 members for approval.

A union spokesperson declined to comment further.

Associated press

Kindergarten students listening to a teacher reading a story at Chicago’s Doze Elementary School on Monday, January 11, 2021 (Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Chicago Sun-Times via AP, Pool)

CPS officials say opening schools is safe and distance learning does not work for all students, including many black and Latino students who make up the majority of the school district. Union officials said the district’s plans, including air filters for classrooms and a voluntary COVID-19 test for teachers, were underdeveloped.

As part of this proposal, preschool and special education teachers and students will return to the first wave starting Thursday. Kindergarten to Grade 5 students will return on March 1 and Grades 6 to 8 students will return on March 8. For high school students, no date is specified to continue distance learning until another notification is given.

Illinois rolls out final round of vaccination Last month it included teachers, but supply was limited.

The school’s executive director, Janice Jackson, said on Sunday that 2,000 teachers and staff had returned to work earlier and were living in “medically vulnerable households.” The city then turned to teachers on the city’s dedicated website. Start the vaccination. He’s at the top of the Chicago agenda, which prioritizes people living and working in high-impact areas.

The agreement also outlined indicators of temporary suspension of classroom learning for the entire school district (including 7 consecutive days of positive test rates) and individual classrooms, according to the CPS summary for Sunday trade. Continues to allow some employees to continue distance education if some employees are at increased risk of serious illness due to COVID-19 or if they work as primary caregivers for people at high risk Said donate.

Kindergarten and special education students temporarily returned last month, but after that the battle with the union ended as it escalated. Voted to continue distance education Reject the district plan. Teachers and students at K-8 schools were due to return on February 1 for the first time since they were completely removed last March. The school district offered elementary and secondary students two days of in-person instruction.

The union, if the district excluded teachers, Like I did before, the teacher would be a picket line. Such a decision would disrupt virtual learning for all students. The union held the last strike in 2019.

A December survey found that approximately 77,000 students from preschool to age eight were interested in returning to class. Pre-enrollment students and some special education students received face-to-face lessons five days a week, while K-8 students were offered face-to-face lessons two days a week and distance lessons on other days. It has been provided.

Participants are below expectations.

Of the nearly 17,000 qualified preschool and special education students, according to the CPS, around 6,500 want to return, but after the reopening in January, around 3,200, or just 19%.

Districts and unions have already reached agreement on other aspects, such as breakdown and contact tracing.

Follow Sophia Tareen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sophiatareen.

Chicago teachers’ union reached tentative deal to reopen public schools

Source link Chicago, teachers’ union reached tentative deal to reopen public schools





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When it comes to reopening, schools aren’t created equal https://cec-ugc.org/when-it-comes-to-reopening-schools-arent-created-equal/ https://cec-ugc.org/when-it-comes-to-reopening-schools-arent-created-equal/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 19:03:47 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/when-it-comes-to-reopening-schools-arent-created-equal/ Regarding the reopening of schools, is Prime Minister Doug Ford abandoning his responsibilities? When announcing the extended lockdowns in Ontario, the Premier was asked if there was a chance that schools would open in June. “I just need the union leaders to sit down with the docs and find a solution,” he replied. Earlier, he […]]]>


Regarding the reopening of schools, is Prime Minister Doug Ford abandoning his responsibilities? When announcing the extended lockdowns in Ontario, the Premier was asked if there was a chance that schools would open in June. “I just need the union leaders to sit down with the docs and find a solution,” he replied.

Earlier, he had pointed out that he recognized the concern of parents and the position of doctors who want schools to open. Even then, he hinted that he was handing the decision to “public health doctors, teachers and union partners to agree on the best way forward.”

“We also need a consensus,” said the Prime Minister. “And we just don’t have that right now.”

Let’s follow the story here. Ford is publicly relinquishing his government’s authority to reopen the school to fruitful negotiations between “docs” and workers.

Moments later, the province’s chief medical officer of health followed up, apparently restoring some of the government’s authority over the decision. “But we’re going to have further discussions, both with our public health units, with the Department of Education to determine when is the best time, the right time. Because our schools were safe and we want them to open and stay open. “

All the back and forth over who decides whether schools can reopen this year isn’t just about who is actually responsible for that decision. It also raises the question of what Ford and Williams mean by “schools”.

The latest versions of the Guide to Reopening Ontario Schools, unlike previous versions, recognize that different types of schools exist in the province – including public, private and First Nations schools.

Ford and Williams act like they’re talking about all schools and all students.

But their desire to gain approval from teachers’ unions indicates that they are not. Organized work speaks on behalf of educators in about three out of four schools in the province. Public schools.

And the rest? The guide has been updated to recognize that First Nations schools in Ontario fall under federal jurisdiction and are therefore exempt from the guidelines. Their exemptions mean they have a lot more local freedom for decision making.

So where does that leave the rest of the schools, the other 1,450 or so independent (or private) schools? According to the Prime Minister’s logic, do doctors speak for themselves? These union leaders?

Independent schools – about half have a religious definition and almost all claim a separate approach to teaching and learning – are ready to open once stay-at-home orders are lifted.

They will bring the same spirit of cooperation with local public health that marked their posture throughout the pandemic. As immunization coverage increases and the effects of the pandemic diminish, teachers, families, councils and independent school principals stand ready to contribute to their communities by providing healthy and safe places for students to finish well. this school year.

They don’t need to wait for the blessing of the teachers’ unions.

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If discussions at the docs and union tables result in the closure of public schools, despite the lockdown being lifted, where does that leave the rest of the schools?

When will Ford make a seat at the table for everyone involved in the education landscape in Ontario? And when will he speak for the good people scattered across the province who are educating well and safely? And are you ready to take the shutters off their school buildings?

Amanda Dervaitis is Executive Director of the Ontario Federation of Independent Schools and Deani Van Pelt is President of the Edvance Christian Schools Association



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