Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:38:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Teachers Unions – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 No, the Soviet and Chinese communists have not controlled American institutions for decades https://cec-ugc.org/no-the-soviet-and-chinese-communists-have-not-controlled-american-institutions-for-decades/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:23:48 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/no-the-soviet-and-chinese-communists-have-not-controlled-american-institutions-for-decades/ In a recent interview with Fox News, conservative commentator and longtime foreign policy pundit Monica Crowley made a bold claim: Overseas communists have controlled key institutions of American life for decades. Crowley, who served as assistant secretary for public affairs in the Treasury Department during the Trump administration, was interviewed in the June 12 edition […]]]>

In a recent interview with Fox News, conservative commentator and longtime foreign policy pundit Monica Crowley made a bold claim: Overseas communists have controlled key institutions of American life for decades.

Crowley, who served as assistant secretary for public affairs in the Treasury Department during the Trump administration, was interviewed in the June 12 edition of Fox News’ weekly “The Next Revolution With Steve Hilton.”

In the interview, she accused President Joe Biden and the Democratic Party of deliberately obliterating the United States. She said such efforts to destroy America by liberals were part and parcel of a longstanding plan hatched by the Soviet Union in the 1930s.

Crowley began by saying, “It is difficult for most Americans to understand that their President and a whole major political party in the United States are intentionally destroying and crippling the United States. But that is exactly what is happening here. And unless and until we understand this, we cannot effectively counter it.

Hilton agreed with Crowley’s analysis, then asked where the Democrats’ desire to hurt the country came from. Crowley replied

It is a long-term project of the left. It actually started in the 1930s and grew out of the KGB (the former Russian secret police agency). It was a KGB operation to destroy the country. And then after World War II, the Soviets actually changed tactics. And what they set out to do, and it’s been very effective for many decades, is to infiltrate and take over the main pillars of American life. They have taken over culture – so entertainment, movies, TV, music. They took over academia, college level and now it’s all down to kindergarten and even younger. And they took over the media.

With these pillars, they were able to inflict tremendous damage for many decades. And now we are at a tipping point where the useful idiots on the left – the Soviet Union collapsed, the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) stepped in to take over this grand project of destroying the country from within – c is exactly what is happening. And now when you have useful idiots at the highest levels of power, including the White House, including Congress, you see the tipping point accelerating, to the point where we are almost at the point of no return.

We interviewed more than a dozen experts on the history of communist influence in the United States and they offered a unanimous answer: as the Soviet Union sought to control the great pillars of the United States, and while the USSR racked up a few decades of scattered success in attracting support from the United States, Crowley is quite wrong to say that the USSR or China ever controlled entertainment, education or the media, let alone less than they do today.

Several pundits told PolitiFact that Crowley rehashes arguments aired since the 1950s by the John Birch Society and other groups. On the contrary, they said his exaggeration of widespread overseas communist control of American institutions is more extreme and less accurate.

“The claim that the Soviet and Chinese Communists ever controlled or now control (such institutions) is nonsense,” said Harvey Klehr, a retired Emory University historian whose books include “The Soviet World of American Communism” and “In Denial: Historians, Communism and Espionage.” Klehr is an advisor to the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation.

Kevin Boyle, a Northwestern University historian and author of “The Shattering: America in the 1960s,” agreed. “The Soviet and Chinese communist governments – or any communist government – never controlled American education, entertainment, or the media. To claim that they ever did is not only false but absolutely ridiculous.

Asked about Crowley’s theory, Andrew Hartman, a historian at Illinois State University and author of “A War for America’s Soul: A History of the Culture Wars,” offered “a resounding no.” It’s nonsense and doesn’t really deserve a serious discussion.

Attempts to reach Crowley through social media and through the Richard Nixon Foundation, where she sits on the board, were unsuccessful.

Pundits have been careful to distinguish between the nefarious things the Communists did in the United States and the idea that they ever controlled major American institutions.

For example, the USSR and Communist China used spies against the United States. “Soviet spies got into the atomic bomb project, and Alger Hiss (who was charged with spying for the Soviet Union) was in the State Department,” said William I. Hitchcock, a historian at the University of Virginia and author of “The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s.

The USSR also exerted influence on the (relatively small) Communist Party of the United States, said Jon Shelton, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and author of “Teacher Strike!: Public Education and the Making of a New American Political Order”.

The most publicized battles involved Hollywood. In the 1930s and 1940s, “there were members and sympathizers of the American Communist Party who were writers, directors, and actors,” said Victor Devinatz, a labor historian at Illinois State University. During World War II, some of these figures helped make anti-fascist films, at a time when the United States was allied with the Soviet Union, and films that had working-class themes, although the films did not have not explicitly advance communist policy.

In the 1950s, Senator Joe McCarthy and other sympathetic members of Congress used the hearings to root Communists out of public life. Some 300 Hollywood figures who refused to cooperate – whether or not they were true communists – were blacklisted from 1950 to 1960.

One of the reasons Crowley is wrong, experts say, is that even the USSR’s limited successes in gaining American influence faded decades ago.

The Smith Act, passed in the 1940s, essentially banned membership in any organization advocating the overthrow of the government, and leaders of the Communist Party of the United States were prosecuted under it after World War II, a Shelton said. In addition, he said, the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 required any union seeking recognition by the National Labor Relations Board to ensure that its officers signed affidavits stating that they had no never been members of the Communist Party. “Most unions, including those in Hollywood, complied,” Shelton said.

But the most important factor was McCarthy and his allies. “Whatever influence (of the Communists) was gone by the 1940s,” with the rise of McCarthy-style anti-Communist efforts, Klehr said.

Ironically, the USSR had already abandoned most of its activities by the time McCarthy’s efforts were underway.

After 1945, Soviet intelligence officials became terrified that their entire network of Americans would be dragged before the FBI, Allen Weinstein, author of “The Haunted Wood: Soviet Espionage in America,” said in an interview online. 1999. “So they literally stopped all work,” Weinstein said. “Knowing this, it’s ironic to think that four to five years before Senator Joe McCarthy began his escapades, the spies had stopped their work.”

Despite this, in each of the sectors cited by Crowley, the anti-Communist reaction was swift. “Virtually every time the Communists gained any level of influence, they were dramatically suppressed, by many layers of government and civil society,” Shelton said.

In primary and secondary education, for example, “hundreds of communist primary and secondary school teachers were fired” in the 1940s and 1950s, Devinatz said. And the Communist-led teachers’ union in New York was expelled from both the AFL and the CIO, the main labor umbrella groups.

While communists existed in colleges and universities, Klehr said, “they never constituted more than a small minority. Higher education today suffers from many ills, including a stifling leftist orthodoxy, but much of it is tied to identity politics and not run by communists.

And in the media, a few journalists also lost their jobs because of their membership or alleged membership in the Communist Party decades ago, Devinatz said. Today, the idea that communists “control the academy, or the news media, is off the wall,” Klehr said.

Ultimately, even the USSR’s limited success in courting Americans in key professions should not be confused with overseas Communist “control” of these institutions, said Larry Tye, author of “Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy”. The long history of purges of so-called Communists is clear evidence that the individuals who ran these institutions were anti-Communists, not Communists.

“Crowley would claim that anyone with leftist or liberal ideas is a communist puppet,” said Jonathan P. Hunt, professor of rhetoric and language at the University of San Francisco and author of “Communists in the Classroom: Radicals in U.S. Education’, 1930. -1960. “So if I’m in favor of racial equality, or workplace safety regulations, or a 40-hour work week, or any of the hundreds of other political or social , then I must be a communist.”

Crowley said the Soviet and Chinese Communists “took control” of American entertainment, movies, television, music, college, K-12 education and media.

The USSR, and to a lesser extent Communist China, sought to influence the United States for decades, including through espionage and ideological persuasion. Some Americans in entertainment, education, and media favored these ideas, primarily in the 1930s and 1940s.

But even these examples fall far short of proving that each of these pillars of American society was directly controlled by overseas Communists. Concrete examples of communist influence are scattered and decades old. And in each of the areas cited by Crowley, the active efforts of anti-Communists have purged communist sympathizers. This could not have happened if these institutions were in fact controlled by communists.

We evaluate the Pants on Fire statement.

This fact check was originally published by PolitiFact, part of the Poynter Institute. It is republished here with permission. See the sources for this fact check here and more of their fact checks here.

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Health workers reject 100% pay rise, to continue strike – Zimbabwe News Now https://cec-ugc.org/health-workers-reject-100-pay-rise-to-continue-strike-zimbabwe-news-now/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:32:22 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/health-workers-reject-100-pay-rise-to-continue-strike-zimbabwe-news-now/ HARARE – The government on Saturday made a last-ditch effort to avert strikes by its workers by announcing a 100% pay rise, which unions have dismissed as too little. Nurses, senior doctors and radiographers have vowed to go ahead with their planned strike from Monday, and discontent among teachers’ unions is intensifying. In an “open […]]]>

HARARE – The government on Saturday made a last-ditch effort to avert strikes by its workers by announcing a 100% pay rise, which unions have dismissed as too little.

Nurses, senior doctors and radiographers have vowed to go ahead with their planned strike from Monday, and discontent among teachers’ unions is intensifying.

In an “open letter to the public”, unions representing nurses, chief medical officers and radiographers said they had taken the decision to strike.

“This is not a decision that was taken lightly”, they said, “we are fully aware of the human costs involved in any such action, but the conditions of service, in particular the remuneration of workers healthcare, are currently so poor that most healthcare workers can no longer afford the service they provide, nor are they able to care for and support their families.

A meeting between public sector unions and government officials as part of the National Joint Negotiating Committee ended in deadlock on Friday, before the government unilaterally announced the 100% increase.

Inflation jumped to 131.7% in May and a nurse’s monthly salary of around Z$30,000 is worth less than US$50 on the widely used black market currency.

Civil Service Minister Paul Mavima said the government would implement the pay rise from July, adding that further meetings were planned with workers.

“We realize the importance of the need for us to protect our workers,” Mavima said. “The government team will now have to consult to see if there can be a variation from what has been offered, namely the 100 per cent increase. All this will be done taking into account the capacity of the Treasury.

The government last reviewed wages in February, but the Zimbabwean dollar has since lost more than 70% of its value in the official currency market.

Unions fear that with rampant inflation again, when the next review comes around, their wages will be virtually worthless. At Friday’s meeting, they urged the government to pay its workers in US dollars, with the lowest rank receiving $540.

The government opposes the move, warning it would force the country to dollarize again as the finance ministry and central bank try to prop up the local currency,

Teachers’ unions have also warned they are considering strikes as the government faces a winter of discontent from its workers.

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New York State Editorial Roundup: Cannabis Remedies Program, Jacobs Fall, End Mask Warrants | Editorial https://cec-ugc.org/new-york-state-editorial-roundup-cannabis-remedies-program-jacobs-fall-end-mask-warrants-editorial/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/new-york-state-editorial-roundup-cannabis-remedies-program-jacobs-fall-end-mask-warrants-editorial/ The legalization of cannabis for recreational purposes has had adverse effects on people who have used it for medical purposes for years. Many patients are unable to obtain medical marijuana due to bureaucratic and technological failures within the state government. Cannabis Insider’s Brad Racino report last week detailed the difficulties patients face when trying to […]]]>

The legalization of cannabis for recreational purposes has had adverse effects on people who have used it for medical purposes for years. Many patients are unable to obtain medical marijuana due to bureaucratic and technological failures within the state government.

Cannabis Insider’s Brad Racino report last week detailed the difficulties patients face when trying to fill a medical prescription for medical marijuana. He wrote:

“Frustrated patients – some suffering from depression, anxiety, migraines and the effects of chemotherapy – face long delays in getting into the medical program and are unable to get the care they need. Instead of adding patients, New York is looking at them on bail, with some resorting to the gray market.

Racino has documented issues with patients waiting weeks or months to get medical cards from the Office of Cannabis Management, only to find that the cards don’t work; a broken data management system that has been down for three weeks and continues; and the unexplained closure of a delivery service that served rural patients, forcing them to travel long distances to get their medicine.

People also read…

Result: patients suffer unnecessarily. CMO’s assurances that they are working to fix the problems plaguing the medical marijuana market are of little comfort to them.

Some are not waiting for New York to pull itself together. They themselves acquire marijuana from illicit sellers. The perpetuation of this underground economy runs counter to the state’s efforts to create a legal cannabis market. The number of registered patients fell from 12,500 from January to June, to 124,000. New Jersey has 130,000 registered patients with a population less than half that of New York.

Creating the recreational cannabis industry in New York is a complex task. Delays and missteps have already delayed him. The medical marijuana program is collateral damage. It falls to CMO Executive Director Chris Alexander to fix it. The 124,000 patients who use medical cannabis in New York – and many more who could benefit from it – depend on him.

—Advance Media New York

Rep. Chris Jacobs’ stunning fall from grace usually only happens when a crime has been committed or some sort of physical impropriety has occurred.

To see a sitting congressman, who will soon represent a safe congressional district with all the perks of an incumbent, being forced out of a race in less than a week is surprising, especially given the circumstances.

Political support for Jacobs dried up at the public mention that he would vote for tougher federal laws limiting access to body armor, raising the age to buy large-capacity semi-automatic weapons to 21. and supporting banning weapons “like an AR-15”. ”

The reaction against Jacobs was swift and vocal. Republican support evaporated almost overnight. Within a week, Jacobs was forced to drop his bid for the redistributed seat formerly held by Rep. Tom Reed.

To be clear, the solutions that Jacobs and many Democrats have adopted will likely not on their own solve the problem of gun violence facing the nation. Focusing on guns and social media companies, as the state legislature did at the end of its legislative session, without paying the same attention to mental health and the societal factors that drive some people to commit acts of horror as unspeakable as the mass shooting in Buffalo or the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas.

Jacobs’ downfall was shocking, but taken in context, it shouldn’t be surprising. He forgot about mental health, which is half the gun violence equation, during his remarks.

As we assess the way forward after a particularly painful month, we must look at the issue of gun violence holistically rather than simply as a weapons issue. We can go much further this way.

—Jamestown Post-Journal

Is New York’s COVID Mandate Madness Finally Calming Down?

On Tuesday, New York State and the MTA removed their requirements for agency employees to get tested weekly if they are not vaccinated.

More importantly, Mayor Eric Adams on Thursday announced the end – finally – of the senseless, cruel, and utterly anti-science mask mandate for the city’s youngest children.

All for good reason: the data on “public health” efforts like this are unambiguous. Mandates on masks or anything else have no significant effect — good or bad — on citywide or statewide COVID outcomes. They only add onerous demands to people’s daily lives and work, empower Karens in the public and private sectors, and increase costs for taxpayers.

Removing these silly rules may be a sign that New York City’s elected officials and other officials are beginning to take more seriously a reality already recognized by every sane person.

On the other hand, Governor Kathy Hochul refuses to end the transit mask mandate, leaving LIRR and MetroNorth commuters to envy their NJTransit peers. On the subway, meanwhile, we see a steady growth in civil disobedience, which means its stubbornness is undermining the rule of law.

We’ll admit that Hochul and (especially) Adams haven’t been as ridiculous as many of their band members would like. Above all, they avoided backlashes to restrictionism (despite stories of clickbait-for-COVID-hysterics in the likes of The New York Times). Schools remained open statewide despite objections from teachers’ unions; there has been no resurgence of the senseless vaccine passport system that has helped keep the city and state mired in COVID panic for too long.

As Adams aptly put it, if every new wave sends New York “into thoughts of closure (and) panic, we’re not going to function as a city.”

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Arts and science teachers disagree on ongoing strike https://cec-ugc.org/arts-and-science-teachers-disagree-on-ongoing-strike/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:21:13 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/arts-and-science-teachers-disagree-on-ongoing-strike/ Teachers under their umbrella, the Uganda National Teachers Union (UNATU), ended the second day of ongoing industrial action, protesting what they said was a segregated pay rise that only favored teaching professionals. science. According to Philbert Baguma, secretary general of UNATU, the strike which was announced on Tuesday, June 15, 2022 will not be canceled […]]]>

Teachers under their umbrella, the Uganda National Teachers Union (UNATU), ended the second day of ongoing industrial action, protesting what they said was a segregated pay rise that only favored teaching professionals. science.

According to Philbert Baguma, secretary general of UNATU, the strike which was announced on Tuesday, June 15, 2022 will not be canceled until the government commits in writing to respond to teachers’ grievances.

“This strike has nothing to do with the national budget which was read on Tuesday but it goes against the segregated way in which the salary increase has been managed while we are all working under the same conditions. It is unfair that one person earns 4 million shillings a month while his counterparts in the same school earn 800,0000 shillings when they all buy goods from the same places,” Baguma said.

He also dismissed claims that art teachers were protesting jealousy over the pay rise given to their scientific counterparts, noting that the union as a whole was pushing for fairness.

Baguma also pointed out that they have received reports that some government agents are trying to intimidate teachers who did not show up at schools but assured them that they were protected by law.

“Any principal who thinks this strike is irrelevant because he is in a good school like some who say they cannot disobey government orders, they should know there were other teachers who were in this office before and he will also leave when the time comes,” he said.

Katende Ramathan, the national coordinator of the Union of Professional Science Teachers, revealed that science teachers who do not subscribe to UNATU are not part of the strike.

“Why would anyone announce a strike during this time, it looks like they are sabotaging our hard-earned raise. Our colleagues could have joined us in celebrating with us because we have set the bar high for their future negotiations” , said Katende.

He added that the starting point of 4 million shillings for a science teacher’s salary is not too much because they (the protesters) might want the whole world to collect it “because it is not the best paid profession in the country.

“We also support the salary increase of our Art Colleagues but we call on them to deploy better means of negotiation.”

Earlier, UNATU and other civil service unions reached an agreement with the government to have salary increases in all categories for the 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 financial years.

The government, in the recently read budget, provided a salary increase for all science teachers.

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California budget ‘close enough for government work’ https://cec-ugc.org/california-budget-close-enough-for-government-work/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:54:05 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/california-budget-close-enough-for-government-work/ Comment It’s hard to believe that I started writing about California budgets in 1987, now 35 years ago. At that time, it still required a two-thirds vote in both houses of the state legislature to pass a budget, instead of simple majorities like today after Proposition 25 passed in 2010. And the Republicans still held […]]]>

Comment

It’s hard to believe that I started writing about California budgets in 1987, now 35 years ago.

At that time, it still required a two-thirds vote in both houses of the state legislature to pass a budget, instead of simple majorities like today after Proposition 25 passed in 2010. And the Republicans still held more than a third of the seats. . The pace of the budget was set by what has been called the Gang of Five: the Democratic and Republican leaders of the state Assembly and Senate, plus the governor.

That usually meant squabbling continued long after the June 15 constitutional deadline to pass a budget, especially under Republican Gov. Pete Wilson and the Democratic-majority legislature.

In 1999, just like today, the state was jam-packed with excess tax money from the dot-com boom. Incoming Governor Gray Davis and the four legislative leaders quickly reached agreement on the budget numbers. The budget passed minutes after June 16, technically past the deadline, prompting Davis to be deadpan, “close enough for government work.”

Soon, the dot-com boom turned into a dot-com bust. Surpluses turned into deficits of $40 billion. And unlike today, there was no Rainy Day Fund. In 2003, Davis was recalled, for the budget crisis as well as mishandling the 2000-02 electricity crisis and illegally raising the car tax.

It could happen again. In 2022, the legislature passed a budget on June 14, supposedly a day early. But that left big unnegotiated elements of this $300 billion monstrosity, particularly the tax refund that could be sent back to ailing drivers who pay $7 and ride the pumps. Close enough for government work!

The Legislature also gave about half of the projected $97.5 billion surplus to “education,” as required by Proposition 98. Even though schools, according to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s projections, were already due receive more than $20,000 per child, or $600,000 for a typical child. class of 30. Yet, according to EdSource, the state just scored 50th out of 50 states in literacy.

It’s like buying a new Mercedes S550 and ending up with a used Yugo.

This time, at least, the budget reserves reached $38 billion, largely due to 2014’s Proposition 2. Below is a graph of that year’s ballot, showing how quickly the PIT (personal income tax) earnings can drop during recession years. . Notice the dot-com bust of 2001 and the subprime mortgage bust of 2007-09. Nor had Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger prepared the state for the latter, embarking on a spending spree from 2005 to 2007. This led to a record $13 billion in tax increases that he signed in 2009, as well as major budget cuts.

But give Newsom credit where it’s due. Fiscal reserves could probably withstand a year of recession, provided it is not too severe. And he insisted that the surplus be earmarked for one-time expenses. Although teachers’ unions, as they have done in the past, will be reluctant to return their half of the money even in a recession. Last time out, Schwarzenegger got the unions to accept education budget cuts on the condition that the money be “replaced” when the good times returned, which happened after he left.

There’s also the issue of the state’s declining K-12 school population. On April 22, the California Department of Education reported, “Total enrollment decreased from 6,163,001 in 2019-20 to 6,002,523 in 2020-21, a decrease of more than 160,000 students. and 2.6% compared to the previous year. This follows a modest and steady decline in public school enrollment statewide since 2014-15. Complete data is not yet available for the 2021-22 school year which has just ended.

Yet the mandate of Prop. 98 that 40% of state funding goes to schools remains in place. Shouldn’t it be adjusted downward as the population decreases? The extra money could be used to pay off debt in the California state teachers’ retirement system.

According to CalSTRS’ latest full annual financial report, released on December 1, 2021 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021, “An overview of the defined benefit program assets and liabilities as reported in the June 30, 2020 actuarial valuation (published in June 2021) reflects a steady improvement in our financial situation. The funded ratio – the amount of assets available to pay obligations – improved from 66.0% to 67.1%, although the unfunded actuarial obligation increased slightly from 105.7 billion at June 30, 2019 valuation to $105.9 billion at June 30. , 2020, report.

The new report also boasted, “The valuation did not reflect the 27.19% return on investment that CalSTRS achieved in 2020-21. Last year’s historic returns have significantly improved projected funding levels. CalSTRS now expects the defined benefit program to reach full funding before 2046 under current actuarial assumptions. The state’s share of CalSTRS’s unfunded actuarial obligation is now expected to be eliminated by June 30, 2023.”

However, so far in calendar year 2022, the stock market is negative and appears to be continuing to decline. A recession is clearly here, of unknown severity.

Prudence would dictate devoting all of the “surplus” to paying off pension obligations and paying something back to the taxpayers who pay the bills and who will bear the brunt of economic decline. But this is California, the home of Fantasyland.

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Epoch Times.

John Seiller

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John Seiler is a veteran California opinion writer. He has written editorials for The Orange County Register for nearly 30 years. He is a United States Army veteran and former press secretary to California State Senator John Moorlach. He blogs at JohnSeiler.Substack.com

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Zimsec, fresh row markers https://cec-ugc.org/zimsec-fresh-row-markers/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:48:33 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/zimsec-fresh-row-markers/ The Zimbabwe School Examinations Council (Zimsec) and script scorers are heading for another collision as the latter complain that the value of their payments has been eroded by inflation. Zimsec recently paid examiners their dues for scoring the 2021 Ordinary and Advanced level exams. Inflation in Zimbabwe is currently considered the highest in the world […]]]>

The Zimbabwe School Examinations Council (Zimsec) and script scorers are heading for another collision as the latter complain that the value of their payments has been eroded by inflation.

Zimsec recently paid examiners their dues for scoring the 2021 Ordinary and Advanced level exams.

Inflation in Zimbabwe is currently considered the highest in the world and when examiners signed contracts for grading O and A level exams earlier this year, the $33,000 agreements were worth $140, but when the government finally paid, it was around $55.

Reportedly, Zimsec is struggling with a financial crisis that has prevented it from paying reviewers on time.

A reviewer who requested anonymity accused the government of deliberately delaying their payment.

“The government doesn’t care or respect us anymore. That’s not what we signed. When we signed that contract, we were supposed to get $140, but now we can’t even afford it. (nothing). They just want to see us suffer. It’s now been over seven months since we signed those contracts,” the reviewer said.

Teachers’ unions told NewsDay yesterday that marker salaries were grossly inadequate.

Amalgamated Rural Teachers Union of Zimbabwe president Obert Masaraure said their salary was now a travesty.

“These salaries are a travesty of the hard work of our teachers scoring O and A level exams. When they signed that contract, they expected to be paid around $140, but now they are getting something equivalent at $55.

“This is deliberate on the part of Zimsec and the government. It is unfortunate and in the future teachers may choose not to participate in this process. We urge teachers to sign term contracts in the future determined. They can sue them,” says Masaraure.

In a tweet, the Progressive Teachers Union of Zimbabwe (PTUZ) said the figures given to examiners caused a sense of shock.

“Zimsec eventually paid the O and A Level markers their dues, about $33,000. When they signed their contracts in February, it was worth US$135. Today it’s US$55. The two numbers cause a sense of shock. Has the profession fallen out of favor so much?” asked PTUZ.

The vice president of the Zimbabwe Educators’ Union, Tapedza Zhou, said the government had not taken teachers seriously.

“It’s disgusting. We are not happy with the salary. It shows how Zimsec and the government are not serious about the welfare of teachers. We say after work we deserve to be paid, and they deliberately postponed the payment of these teachers because they know that after a certain period of time, this money will lose value,” Zhou said.

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Virginia should not give local school boards exclusive power over charter permissions https://cec-ugc.org/virginia-should-not-give-local-school-boards-exclusive-power-over-charter-permissions/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 15:06:20 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/virginia-should-not-give-local-school-boards-exclusive-power-over-charter-permissions/ Placeholder while loading article actions The Washington Post recently published an intriguing commentary on education by Virginia Del. Nick Freitas and Americans for Prosperity-Virginia Deputy Director Jacob Fish. Its title was “Transforming Virginia’s Education System to Create Opportunity for All.” My political views may differ somewhat from theirs. But our country has a long history […]]]>
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The Washington Post recently published an intriguing commentary on education by Virginia Del. Nick Freitas and Americans for Prosperity-Virginia Deputy Director Jacob Fish. Its title was “Transforming Virginia’s Education System to Create Opportunity for All.”

My political views may differ somewhat from theirs. But our country has a long history of nonpartisan efforts to improve our schools. It could happen again with people like Freitas (R-Culpeper) and Fish in a state that I love as much as they do.

My mother and her mother were born in Virginia. My first job at the Washington Post covered evening school board meetings in the Virginia communities of Arlington and Alexandria. I did assignments in China and California, but realized in the 1990s that I wanted to write about American teachers. Virginia was then making bold reforms.

Its learning standards reviews have raised the standard of education in a way that is the envy of other states. Northern Virginia districts were also among the first in the nation to open Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate college-level courses and exams to all students who wished to take them.

Opinion: Transform Virginia’s education system to create opportunities for all

Freitas and Fish rightly focused their article on empowering parents to provide their children with the most qualified education. “Students should not be denied the education that is best for them because of their zip code or their parents’ financial circumstances,” they said. They quoted Governor Glenn Youngkin (right) as saying: ‘When parents are empowered and engaged, a child’s life is improved.’

They highlighted ideas such as state money to help pay for tuition, fees, textbooks, tutoring, and other qualified expenses at schools chosen by parents. They said they wanted students to be able to attend any public school inside or outside their school district and enroll in apprenticeships and competency-based learning.

However, they omitted an important factor. I agreed when they said that “parents are in the best position to make educational decisions for their children”. But parents need help finding what works. The state should encourage resourceful educators to open new schools, something Virginia resisted and Freitas and Fish did not mention.

Public charter schools are privately run with taxpayers’ money. They aren’t perfect, but many of them have become creative devices for more effective teaching. Freitas and Fish mention charters but fail to point out that Virginia only has seven. Indeed, district school boards in the Old Dominion have blocked new charters within their borders for years. Virginia appears to be one of only three states, the others being Maryland and Kansas, that give local school boards this exclusive power. The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools has good information.

I live in California. There are no such restrictions, although there are powerful teachers’ unions which criticize the charters because most of them are not unionized. County school boards or the California state school board can approve new charters if the local board does not. Strangely, the issue of charter permission didn’t come up much in Virginia’s high-profile furor over schools in last year’s state election, though Youngkin called for another 20 this year. charters in the state.

One of the best districts in Virginia, Fairfax County, is one of the worst for this. He rejected good charter ideas not because the state’s teachers’ unions (weaker than in some other states) oppose them, but because many school leaders in wealthy Fairfax believe that charters are inferior to them. One of the best teachers I know tried to create a charter for low-income kids in Fairfax County. It had strong support from experts and community leaders, but fell through because school officials balked at doing something charter-rich Washington, D.C. was doing. I feel like some school boards are also resisting charters because they might show that regular schools are inadequate in some way.

Fairfax Charter School: An Impossible Dream?

To make good decisions, parents need to see the best ideas in action. In the 1990s, two young educators started a little charter in the South Bronx. It was one of the first KIPP schools, now the largest charter network in the country. Many South Bronx parents thought KIPP teachers Dave Levin and Frank Corcoran were overwhelmed. But when word spread about everything the KIPP kids were learning, opinion changed.

KIPP College used the fourth floor of a regular public school in the South Bronx. Staff at this school attempted to evict KIPP from the building. The effort fell apart when more than 200 KIPP parents appeared at a crucial board meeting, chanting “KIPP, KIPP, KIPP, KIPP”.

Freitas and Fish should push to end giving local school boards exclusive power over charter permissions. The fact that the issue was rarely raised in recent elections may mean that campaign consultants did not find it of interest to voters.

Its good. He can be accurately described as non-partisan. We all have differences with our neighbors, but many of us, perhaps reluctantly, admit that we are happiest when we have something we can agree on.

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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot to seek second term https://cec-ugc.org/chicago-mayor-lori-lightfoot-to-seek-second-term/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:44:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/chicago-mayor-lori-lightfoot-to-seek-second-term/ Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot will ask voters to return her to City Hall for a second term as leader of the nation’s third-largest city, she announced Tuesday. In a video announcing her re-election bid, Lightfoot sought to turn criticism that she’s too combative into a strength by promising to keep fighting for Chicagoans as she […]]]>

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot will ask voters to return her to City Hall for a second term as leader of the nation’s third-largest city, she announced Tuesday.

In a video announcing her re-election bid, Lightfoot sought to turn criticism that she’s too combative into a strength by promising to keep fighting for Chicagoans as she seeks a second term. By embracing her image as a political pugilist, Lightfoot is betting that Chicago voters will see her as a righteous fighter rather than someone who throws unnecessary hay.

“When we fight for change, confront a global pandemic, work to keep kids in school, confront guns and gangs, systemic inequality and political corruption only for powerful forces to try to stop Chicago’s progress — of course, I take it personally, for our city,” Lightfoot said. “Change does not happen without a struggle. It’s hard. It takes time. And, I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not the most patient person. I’m only human, and I guess sometimes it shows. But just because some don’t always like my delivery doesn’t mean we don’t deliver.

Lightfoot’s announcement that she will seek re-election in the February 2023 mayoral race comes as no surprise. Despite the wishful thinking of some Lightfoot critics that she would step down from the race, the first-term mayor has long set herself up to defend her record and seek four more years in office.

The mayor currently faces five challengers, all of whom have raised questions about high crime and criticized his leadership as unnecessarily divisive. Their opponents so far include South Side Ald. Roderick Sawyer, son of a former mayor; former Chicago Public School CEO Paul Vallas; Illinois State Rep. Kam Buckner; Southwest side Ald. Raymond Lopez; and businessman Willie Wilson.

For more than three years in office, Lightfoot faced spikes in crime, failed to run an administration as transparent as promised, and engaged in constant battles with unions representing teachers and the police — all while struggling to forge good relationships with politicians or city leaders. business community.

His poll has struggled in recent months, especially with white and Latino voters, but the hard-charging mayor cannot be removed from office.

Lightfoot has quietly built a strong relationship with several key union leaders, who hail his progressive record on union issues such as the Fair Work Week Ordinance and a $15 minimum wage. Tenure, in any form, also has power. As mayor, Lightfoot earmarked about $3 billion in federal funds for city projects and she launched a series of programs aimed at reversing one of the biggest criticisms of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s tenure — divestment from neighborhoods. of Chicago, especially on its south and west sides.

Lightfoot can also argue that she deserves more time to complete the job after dealing with the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic and some of the city’s largest civil unrest since the 1960s.

Whoever becomes mayor of Chicago in 2023 will assume responsibility for a city struggling with serious financial problems, rampant gun violence and a troubling history of segregation that continues to exist and contribute to crime and inequity.

The next mayor will also navigate major changes to Chicago’s public schools, which will transition to an independent elected school board over the next few years. Lightfoot campaigned for an elected school board, but unsuccessfully tried to block a state law creating a 21-member body to oversee Chicago schools.

As a contestant in 2019, Lightfoot said she would be different from Emanuel and vowed not to lead with her “middle finger”. But as mayor, Lightfoot took an approach to governance that led Ald. Susan Sadlowski Garza, a longtime ally who has said she won’t support re-election for the mayor, to sum up her tenure this way: “I’ve never met someone who managed to piss off every single person with who he contacted. — police, firefighters, teachers, aldermen, businesses, factories.

Lightfoot has, at various times: accused Uber of “paying black ministers” to oppose ride-sharing taxes, without providing any evidence; told the aldermen “don’t come to me for s—-” if they didn’t support his budget; and confronted a teachers’ union activist by pointing his finger in the woman’s face as her personal assistant tried unsuccessfully to drag her away.

The popular consensus that Lightfoot is alienating large constituencies is a stark turn from the position she found herself in the April 2019 election runoff, when she won all 50 wards in a victory overwhelming against Cook County Council Chairman Toni Preckwinkle, who is also the head of the Cook. County Democratic Party.

But Lightfoot’s position with voters is more complex and always has been.

In the first round of the mayoral campaign in 2019, Lightfoot emerged from a historic field of 14 candidates with around 18% of the vote. While that was enough for him to take first place and advance to the final round against Preckwinkle, it still shows that 4 out of 5 voters in that first round chose someone else. In that first February 2019 election, Lightfoot enjoyed broad support from North Side Lakeside voters, who are often liberal. This time, the mayor is expected to be strongest with African American voters – but that could be complicated by the field including strong black alternatives.

Wilson, in particular, could be a challenge to Lightfoot’s fortunes as he won most black quarters in 2019 and helped boost his campaign on the South and West sides with his endorsement in the second round.

Buckner released a statement on Tuesday calling Lightfoot “completely ill-equipped to lead Chicago” and saying she had “no strategic vision to make the people of Chicago safer.”

“Carjackings and violence are at record levels, economic divestment is drying up our neighborhoods, our schools are under-resourced, our police department is overburdened and understaffed. Instead of a public safety plan, she raised bridges, erected barricades and demanded curfews,” Buckner said.

Lightfoot’s re-election announcement was also criticized by the Chicago Teachers Union, which tore it up for partially balancing the city budget by asking the school district to cover retirement payments traditionally paid by the city hall.

The mayor is launching her re-election bid by balancing the city budget on the backs of children who need more instead of less,” the union, which is expected to back another candidate, said in a statement. “Chicago voters need to understand that this budget is unacceptable and is another example of failed leadership.”

gpratt@chicagotribune.com

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Michael Bloomberg says America’s public school system is failing and blames teachers’ unions https://cec-ugc.org/michael-bloomberg-says-americas-public-school-system-is-failing-and-blames-teachers-unions/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 06:05:49 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/michael-bloomberg-says-americas-public-school-system-is-failing-and-blames-teachers-unions/ Michael Bloomberg says America’s public school system is failing and blames teachers’ unions for resisting return to classroom teaching ‘long after it was clear they were safe’ Michael Bloomberg’s op-ed, ‘A Wake Up Call for Public Education,’ describes the public education system as ‘failing’ Bloomberg cited a national analysis that “contained a deeply troubling finding […]]]>

Michael Bloomberg says America’s public school system is failing and blames teachers’ unions for resisting return to classroom teaching ‘long after it was clear they were safe’

  • Michael Bloomberg’s op-ed, ‘A Wake Up Call for Public Education,’ describes the public education system as ‘failing’
  • Bloomberg cited a national analysis that “contained a deeply troubling finding that has generated little public discussion when it should cause an outcry”
  • Nearly 1.3 million students have left public schools since the start of the pandemic
  • In New York, K-12 enrollment drops 9%
  • Bloomberg also criticized teachers’ union leaders for “resisting a return to classroom teaching long after it was clear classrooms were safe.”
  • Bloomberg named public charter schools a more efficient way to educate American students

Michael Bloomberg says the US public school system is failing and blames teachers’ union leaders for resisting a return to classroom instruction “long after it was clear classrooms were safe”.

The former New York mayor and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate described the public education system as “failing” in an op-ed titled “A Wake Up Call for Public Education” that was published Thursday, after a analysis found that a report of 1.3 million students have left public schools since the start of the pandemic.

Bloomberg said the message to educators and elected officials could hardly be clearer: “Too many public schools are failing, parents are voting with their feet, and urgent, bold action is needed.”

“So far, however, the only government response has been to spend more money – too much of which has gone to everyone but our children,” he continued.

Bloomberg also criticized teachers’ union leaders for “resisting a return to classroom teaching long after it became clear that classrooms were safe.”

In the op-ed, Bloomberg cited a recent national analysis that “contained a deeply troubling finding that has generated little public debate when it should cause an outcry.”

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg described the public education system as “failing” in an op-ed titled “A Wake Up Call for Public Education” that was published Thursday.

Chicago's Pulaski International School closed for a period in January 2022 after the teachers' union voted to return to remote learning

Chicago’s Pulaski International School closed for a period in January 2022 after the teachers’ union voted to return to remote learning

“A recent national analysis contained a deeply troubling discovery that has generated little public debate when it should cause an outcry: nearly 1.3 million students have left public schools since the start of the pandemic,” wrote Bloomberg.

“Most states have seen declining enrollment for two straight years. In New York, K-12 enrollment dropped 9%,” he continued.

Bloomberg called distance learning a “disaster” and said that, according to an analysis, “the first year of the pandemic left students an average of five months behind in math and four months in reading, with gaps much more important for low-income schools”.

He noted that now students have “fleed public schools in record numbers, states are paying more to educate fewer children.”

“It could have been acceptable if the students showed great improvement. Instead, we pay more for failure,” he added.

“A recent national analysis contained a deeply troubling discovery that has generated little public debate when it should cause outcry: nearly 1.3 million students have left public schools since the start of the pandemic,” wrote Bloomberg.

The former mayor’s solution is the public charter school system, which he says is moving in the opposite direction, “thanks to their success, even though their federal funding hasn’t increased in the past four years. “.

He pointed out that from From 2020 to 2021, nearly 240,000 new students enrolled in charter schools, a 7% year-over-year increase.

“Many charter schools across the country have long waiting lists, and it’s no wonder,” he wrote. “In states and cities with strong accountability laws, charters have been proven to outperform district schools in school.”

“A recent national analysis found that districts with a higher share of charters had higher reading and math scores as well as higher graduation rates on average,” he continued. “Other research has shown that the benefits are particularly pronounced for black, Latino, and low-income students.”

However, charter schools remain underfunded, he wrote, leaving students to fill public schools, which he says will continue to fail students and future generations unless there is have a reform.

“The idea that we would allow public charter school students from disadvantaged backgrounds to be deprived of great teachers so that we can staff schools with declining enrollment as if they were full makes no sense. — until the politics are considered,” Bloomberg wrote. “And then it makes perfect sense, because so many elected officials are beholden to union leaders who oppose charters.”

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Get tough on students and schools, says union after teacher attacked at rugby game https://cec-ugc.org/get-tough-on-students-and-schools-says-union-after-teacher-attacked-at-rugby-game/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 04:28:21 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/get-tough-on-students-and-schools-says-union-after-teacher-attacked-at-rugby-game/ Teacher safety has come under the spotlight after a teacher was attacked at a school in the Northern Cape over the weekend. Teachers’ unions are concerned for the safety of teachers after an assault this weekend. A teacher was assaulted after refereeing a rugby match at a school in the Northern Cape. Unions say more […]]]>

Teacher safety has come under the spotlight after a teacher was attacked at a school in the Northern Cape over the weekend.

  • Teachers’ unions are concerned for the safety of teachers after an assault this weekend.
  • A teacher was assaulted after refereeing a rugby match at a school in the Northern Cape.
  • Unions say more needs to be done to instill values ​​in students.

Teacher safety has come under the spotlight after a teacher was attacked at a school in the Northern Cape over the weekend. Teacher unions are now calling for increased safety in schools and interventions to promote teacher safety.

On Saturday, two pupils and parents from the North Cape allegedly assaulted a teacher, who was acting as a referee during a rugby match at Hoërskool Daniëlskuil. Spectators and players of Hoërskool Daniëlskuil were reportedly unhappy with the referee’s handling of the match.

The school had since launched an internal investigation, Hoërskool Daniëlskuil school board chairman Jan-George van Straten said, and the pupils were suspended. The school is also trying to identify the parents involved in the assault.

READ | Police investigate attack on referee at school rugby match

South African Democratic Teachers Union (Sadtu) spokesperson Nomusa Cele said the incident highlighted the safety risks for teachers, especially as the incident happened on the pitch. from school.

“We never want to see something like this happen. It shows teachers are not safe,” she said.

Cele expressed concern about the apparent lack of respect shown by parents and students towards the teacher.

Cele said:

It’s one thing for a referee to get heckled, but it’s another thing for the teacher to get beaten up. This happened in full view of the learners, which means that the parents are not setting a good example for their children and teaching them that violence is acceptable.

The acting president of the National Teachers’ Union, Sibusiso Malinga, said the organization condemned all acts of violence against teachers.

“Incidents like this, at school or at sporting events, cannot be allowed. It is the responsibility of schools and the Department of Education to make workplaces safe,” he said. -he declares.

However, Federation of School Governing Bodies (Fedsas) CEO Jaco Deacon said the North Cape storming should be seen as an isolated incident, carried out by “passionate supporters” of the sport.

Although the assault was the exception rather than the norm, the school was right to address the issue and take action against the students, he said.

Deacon added that parents involved in the assault, once identified, could be removed from school grounds. He said many schools are also enforcing a code of conduct for parents and spectators at games, as a preventive measure.

“In the school community there must also be an emphasis that sport is about the development of the child and should not be taken seriously,” he said.

Deacon stressed that schools need to do more than focus on disciplinary processes. He suggested starting programs that celebrate diversity and instill an ubuntu spirit.

“We need to move towards a values-based system with universal values ​​such as respect,” he said.

Cele advocated for increased safety in schools, but said more work needed to be done with the wider community.

She says:

It is a question of society. It is high time that we have a discussion about violence in our society and that everyone gets involved in the issues that arise in our schools.

Cele also called for stricter rules at school sports matches and said schools or players should be suspended for misbehavior.

“You don’t see this sort of thing in club and league matches because the club would be fined or suspended. Learners shouldn’t assume they have the right to play and should earn their place on the ground. We need to suspend learners and schools from the games if they engage in violence. It sounds difficult, but it’s the only way to hold them accountable,” she said.

Malinga urged schools to hire “armed and trained security guards” to protect teachers, saying other government facilities, such as clinics, have similar security. He added that arrangements should also be made to ensure police presence at sporting events, especially in areas where public sports facilities are used.

Earlier this year, Gauteng Education MEC Panyaza Lesufi described the schools as ‘sitting ducks’ after Deputy Headmaster of Phomolong Secondary School Thembisile Ngendane was shot dead as he was driving out of school in Tembisa.

At the time, he said more than 80% of the department’s budget was spent on teacher salaries, with almost all of the rest allocated to upgrading and maintaining infrastructure. He said that left little funds to increase school safety.

In February, News24 reported that a secondary school teacher was allegedly assaulted by a Grade 11 girl and her father at Setjhaba se Maketse co-educational school in Botshabelo in the Free State. The child allegedly collapsed in front of the teacher’s class earlier in the day, and when the parents were called to school, they allegedly confronted and attacked the teacher.

In April, a video of a teacher being jumped on and shocked during a classroom fight at a Johannesburg school went viral. During the scuffle, which involved several pupils, a schoolboy from Hoërskool Jan de Klerk in Krugersdorp jumped onto a teacher’s back and held him in a chokehold.

READ | A pupil jumps on the back of his teacher during a chaotic class fight in Johannesburg

At the time of publication, National Education Ministry spokesman Elijah Mhlanga was unable to provide an exact number of teachers who had been attacked in schools.

He said the department’s hands were tied when it came to teacher safety.

“The relationship between a learner and a teacher is such that contact is obligatory. It therefore becomes impossible to prevent close interaction. The issue of learner violence is directly linked to whether or not they are taught at home , [their] values. No one knows what’s in a learner’s head. The only measures that are applied are those that apply once the violence has taken place,” Mhlanga said.

“The search of learners is done, and dangerous items are confiscated, but in a context where someone attacks you with [their] bare hands, victims must open an assault file with the police.”


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