Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 23:19:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Ronald Berman, president of the humanities foundation, dies at 91 https://cec-ugc.org/ronald-berman-president-of-the-humanities-foundation-dies-at-91/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 23:03:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/ronald-berman-president-of-the-humanities-foundation-dies-at-91/ Placeholder while loading article actions Ronald S. Berman, a Shakespearean scholar whose chairmanship of the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 1970s brought successful museum exhibitions and innovative public programming to audiences of millions and who also found himself in a political confrontation with a powerful senator, died on May 17. at his home […]]]>
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Ronald S. Berman, a Shakespearean scholar whose chairmanship of the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 1970s brought successful museum exhibitions and innovative public programming to audiences of millions and who also found himself in a political confrontation with a powerful senator, died on May 17. at his home in San Diego. He was 91 years old.

The cause was cancer, his daughter Julia Grossman said.

Dr. Berman, who spent much of his career teaching English literature at the University of California, San Diego, was a scholar of Renaissance and Restoration theater. But he was also engaged in the political culture of his time, sometimes in a combative way.

A lifelong Republican, he practiced an intellectual and political conservatism that was shaped in part by his difficult upbringing in Brooklyn in the 1930s and 1940s. As the first member of his Russian-Jewish immigrant family to attend college , he helped pay for tuition at Harvard and Yale with scholarships as well as jobs as diverse as a bibliography: deckhand in the Merchant Navy, road worker in Alaska, and Navy Reserve. officer.

His 1968 book, “America in the Sixties,” raised alarm about the rise of the New Left in academia. In a tangy social critique, he lamented the “disastrous vulgarization of intellectual life” encouraged, in his description, by left-wing campus radicals. He lambasted polymath Bertrand Russell and Marxian philosopher Herbert Marcuse – liberal darlings social activists – like “the Abbott and Costello of political philosophy”.

At UCSD, Dr. Berman was a noted teacher who once ran a college prep program for Black and Chicano students who, like him, come from underprivileged backgrounds. He molded himself in the mold of his hero, the political philosopher Sidney Hook, engaging with students with whom he disagreed on politics in the spirit of “intellectual tolerance”.

After President Richard M. Nixon appointed him chairman of the NEH – an agency responsible for administering grants for teaching and research in the humanities, in areas ranging from linguistics to literature to archeology – Dr. Berman insisted at his confirmation hearing in 1971 that he would “consider all applicants to this institution equally competent, equally deserving” to receive merit-based fellowships.

He also pledged to democratize the humanities by expanding grantmaking to secondary education and working class and minority communities historically excluded from the field.

In addition to launching K-12 programs and workshops for teachers across the country, he has supported tours of wildly popular museums, including the ancient Egyptian “Treasures of Tutankhamen” and the miniseries 13-part public television series “The Adams Chronicles” (1976), which featured George Grizzard as future President John Adams and laid the foundation for later historical television series.

During his tenure, NEH’s budget grew from over $29 million to nearly $100 million, a figure that eclipses the independent agency’s current appropriations if adjusted for inflation.

“Everyone was surprised,” said Richard Ekman, former NEH program manager and division director. “Here’s that curator, but a scholarly curator, not an ideologue, who managed to get everybody’s respect and everybody’s cooperation and help the NEH grow like that.”

Dr. Berman won bipartisan support in his early years at NEH, but he was not without criticism. He faced an early leadership crisis when he vetoed a request to fund college courses exploring the lyrics of Bob Dylan and the Beatles, as well as another examining the writings of Charles Reich, author of the best -counterculture seller “The Greening of America”.

Dr Berman said critics of his decision confused “the humanities with humanitarianism”. He also argued that the lessons were insufficient in focusing entirely on the lyrics and the book, rather than using them as starting points for the exploration of scholarly ideas. He was sometimes presented as an elitist, a charge he vehemently disputed.

“You can be accused of elitism if you confine [education] to the elite,” he said at the time, “but you can’t be accused of elitism if you bring the best to the most.

Its main antagonist and bearer of the cudgel of elitism was Senator Claiborne Pell, a flinty and influential Democrat from Rhode Island who liked to say “I always let the other do what I want”. Pell was the legislative father of the NEH, which was created by the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act of 1965.

Pell, who said too many grants were given to East Coast scholars and universities, wanted the NEH to follow the model of the agency’s better-known twin, the National Endowment for the Arts, which funneled funds to state-level arts councils. State Humanities Committees were first established in 1971 and arrived in all 50 states within a few years of Dr. Berman’s appointment.

As the committees began their work administering local grants focused on state history, Pell lobbied for the committees to have greater autonomy and status as permanent councils, as well as to turn over 20% of the NEH budget to state governors.

Dr. Berman opposed the move, saying decentralizing the review process would make the quality of grantmaking uneven across states. Pell countered by calling him elitist and pointing out the past grants from the NEH which he hoped would embarrass Dr. Berman ($35,000 to Harvard for a catalog of 4,000 Byzantine seals), and obstruct his renomination by President Gerald Ford in 1977.

Pell prevailed on the issue of state committees, which became permanent councils with the ability to independently administer grants and request NEH support annually. Currently, councils receive approximately 40% of agency funding.

Timothy Gunn, Program Coordinator and Officer at NEH in the 1970s, Dr. Berman said, “expanded the scope of the endowment in so many interesting and fruitful ways. … For someone who had gone to the most prestigious Ivy League schools, it This was his emphasis and his drive to reach a wide audience by not diluting the humanities, by not diminishing in any way the quality of what was offered.

Ronald Stanley Berman was born in Brooklyn on December 15, 1930. His parents divorced when he was 5 years old. He was raised primarily by his mother, grandmother, and other female relatives who spoke mostly Yiddish. He was a teenager when his mother, a civil servant, remarried; he did not keep in touch with his father.

He developed a fascination for literature very early on. “I started reading ‘The Odyssey’ when I was 7,” he told The New York Times. “I was a bookworm. Mom had to throw me out of the house” to play. He quickly excelled outdoors as well, winning several racing championships.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Harvard in 1952. He never took English classes as an undergraduate for fear of exposing his heavy Brooklyn accent and poor background to ridicule from his classmates. . Even so, he was accepted into Yale’s graduate English program in 1956 after submitting hundreds of pages in which he critiqued literary works he had read and admired.

“Immediately Professor Maynard Mack said, ‘You’re in, of course, come along,'” said essayist and author Roger Rosenblatt, a friend and former director of education at NEH, referring to the story. one of Yale’s most distinguished professors of literature.

After earning his Ph.D. in English Literature at Yale in 1959, Dr. Berman taught at Columbia University and Kenyon College in Ohio before joining the faculty at UCSD in 1965. After his tenure at NEH, he returned to San Diego, wrote books on political culture. and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and commented on what he considered wasteful spending on the arts.

His wife of 60 years, the former Barbara Barr, died in 2013. In addition to his daughter, of Silver Spring, Md., survivors include two other children, Katherine Berman of San Diego and Andrew Berman of St. Petersburg, Florida; and three grandchildren.

Dr. Berman taught until his retirement in 2009 and has at times expressed a sense that the atmosphere he cultivated in the classroom – a nurturing interaction between student and teacher – was his most important legacy.

The art of teaching is “almost as extinct as the art of making stained glass,” he told The Times. “You need a lot of patience with people – working hard, up close, like punches. It’s not just about standing at a desk for an hour and looking good.

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Dartmouth eliminates student loans for undergraduates https://cec-ugc.org/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 05:16:27 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds. “Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says […]]]>

Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds.

“Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says President Hanlon. “Eliminating loans from financial aid programs will allow Dartmouth undergraduates to pursue their purpose and passion in the widest possible range of career opportunities.”

Two recent donations capped efforts to eliminate student debt through the campaign. In May, Anne Kubik ’87, a member of the President’s Commission on Financial Aid and an early supporter of the initiative, added $10 million to an earlier pledge to bring the effort closer to reality. An anonymous donor then committed $25 million to complete the campaign, establishing one of the largest scholarship endowments in Dartmouth history.

“Our gratitude for these extraordinary acts of generosity knows no bounds,” said President Hanlon.

“Both donors have told me of their enthusiasm for ensuring that more applicants can pursue an education at Dartmouth without worrying about their financial means.”

– President Philip J. Hanlon ’77

Currently, Dartmouth undergraduates from families with an annual income of $125,000 or less who have typical assets are offered need-based aid with no loan component required. Dartmouth now waives the loan requirement for undergraduate students from families with annual incomes over $125,000 who receive need-based financial aid. This will reduce the debt burden of hundreds of middle-income Dartmouth students and their families by an average of $22,000 over four years. This will in turn open up opportunities for recent graduates to consider career opportunities or higher degrees that they might not otherwise have been able to pursue.

More than 65 families have supported the campaign’s goal of eliminating loan requirements from Dartmouth’s undergraduate financial aid scholarships, committing more than $80 million in donations to the endowment.

“This gift honors Dartmouth’s tradition of service,” says Kubik.

“Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to serve alongside alumni who dedicate hundreds of hours to making Dartmouth stronger for future students. The presidential commission embodied the best of this altruism of the elders. Dartmouth is more welcoming than ever because of it.

-Anne Kubik ’87

Successful applicants to the Class of 2027 will be the first undergraduate students to enroll through this historic investment in Dartmouth’s endowment.

Over the past week, members of the Dartmouth community have rallied to pledge an additional $5 million to eliminate required loans in financial aid scholarships for all current AB students, many of whom have seen their university experience disrupted by the global pandemic. President Hanlon thanked several families for their commitment to extending the no-loan policy to current students: Dana Banga and Angad Banga ’06; Leslie Davis Dahl ’85 and Robert Dahl; Katherine Dunleavy and Keith Dunleavy ’91; Karen Frank and James Frank ’65 (in honor of Peggy Epstein Tanner ’79); Julie McColl-McKenna ’89 and David McKenna ’89; Hadley Mullin ’96 and Daniel Kalafatas ’96; Robin Bryson Reynolds ’91 and Jake Reynolds ’90; and Victoria Ershova and Mike Triplett ’96.

“Dartmouth’s commitment to meeting 100% of demonstrated need for all students is longstanding and a source of pride,” says Lee Coffin, Vice Provost, Admissions and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid. “These new policies reinforce this deep and enduring commitment to full and equal access to an education in Dartmouth. Expanding scholarships by removing loans from all aid programs further levels the playing field as we invite students from all socio-economic backgrounds to join the Dartmouth community.

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2022 Triplett Foundation Grants Total $4,700 https://cec-ugc.org/2022-triplett-foundation-grants-total-4700/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/2022-triplett-foundation-grants-total-4700/ According to Foundation Board Chair Tomm Triplett, three separate grants make up the distribution of the 2022 RL and Etta L. Triplett Foundation grants, which total $4,700. This year’s distribution includes $2,000 for a scholarship awarded to Olivia McCamery, $1,375 to Bluffton Family Recreation and $1,375 to the Bluffton Senior Citizens Association. BHS Postgraduate ScholarshipOlivia […]]]>

According to Foundation Board Chair Tomm Triplett, three separate grants make up the distribution of the 2022 RL and Etta L. Triplett Foundation grants, which total $4,700.

This year’s distribution includes $2,000 for a scholarship awarded to Olivia McCamery, $1,375 to Bluffton Family Recreation and $1,375 to the Bluffton Senior Citizens Association.

BHS Postgraduate Scholarship
Olivia McCamery, a 2022 graduate of Bluffton High School, will enroll at Bluffton University this fall with plans to major in special education. She is the daughter of Robin and Michael Romick.

The foundation began offering scholarships to Bluffton High School graduates who plan to attend Bluffton University. Olivia’s is the first scholarship awarded by the foundation.

Bluffton Family Recreation
BFR, 215 Snider Rd., will use the grant primarily to upgrade its youth sports equipment.

“This grant allows us to better serve our participants and improve the quality of our programs, reaching our youngest and oldest participants,” said Amy Byers, Director of BFR.

“Top of our list is updating our T-ball equipment, which is 15 years old. We will also be purchasing additional size 3 soccer balls and replacing a pickleball net.

BFR’s youth sports programs include nearly 120 youth sports teams involving nearly 1,400 young people over a 12-month period.

Bluffton Senior Citizens Association
The Bluffton Senior Center, 132 N. Main, averages about 12 day trips a year from March through December.

“We plan to use the money to subsidize day trips for people who could use financial assistance to pay for a trip,” director Tonya Meyer said.

“Day trips offer more than entertainment. They provide education, socialization and an emotional boost to those who have been stuck at home for a few years due to the pandemic,” she added.

“This grant allows more seniors to participate in these fun activities. We are very grateful.

Members will need to complete an application to receive a grant.

About the foundation
RL Triplett was the founder of the Triplett Corp. of Bluffton. His wife, Etta Lantz Triplett, was the founder of the home economics department at Bluffton College. The foundation was incorporated in 1985 and has donated more than $150,000 to organizations in the Bluffton area as a result of applications it receives.

Board members include Tomm Triplett, Chairman; Fred Steiner, vice-president; Pam Weisenbarger, secretary; James West, Treasurer and Terry Mullenhour.

For more information about the foundation, contact Triplett at [email protected]or write to Triplett Memorial Foundation, PO Box 158, Bluffton, OH 45817.

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Policy Brief: Majority Opinion on Education Funding Snubbed in Legislative Assembly | Subscriber https://cec-ugc.org/policy-brief-majority-opinion-on-education-funding-snubbed-in-legislative-assembly-subscriber/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/policy-brief-majority-opinion-on-education-funding-snubbed-in-legislative-assembly-subscriber/ The majority opinion among Arizona voters is pretty clear. The same goes for the majority opinion among Arizona lawmakers. They want a significant increase in ongoing funding for public schools across the state, probably in the range of $500 million to $1 billion a year. Now we even have the money to do it without […]]]>

The majority opinion among Arizona voters is pretty clear.

The same goes for the majority opinion among Arizona lawmakers.

They want a significant increase in ongoing funding for public schools across the state, probably in the range of $500 million to $1 billion a year. Now we even have the money to do it without raising taxes.

Still, it’s doubtful that the majority opinion will prevail as the legislature slowly moves toward a state budget. This is because this majority opinion in the Legislative Assembly is held by all Democrats and a few Republicans in each chamber.

Since the Republicans are the majority party in both chambers, even if it is a slim margin of one person, they are in control. So they’re trying to come up with a budget that most Republicans will support, not a budget that necessarily reflects majority opinion across all bodies.

“There’s this rule that the majority don’t follow,” said Rep. Morgan Abraham, a Democrat from Tucson. “It’s the ‘majority of the majority.’ You have to have the majority of the majority caucus for anything to move forward.”

People also read…

“I know for a fact that there is a majority of members in the House who would sign off on a massive investment in K-12 beyond what Prop. 208 would have done,” he said.

But he might not win the support of the majority of Republicans, so the idea languishes.

Proposition 208 is the 2020 ballot initiative that would have imposed a surtax on income over $250,000 for single people or over $500,000 for married people. Legislative staff projected that it would have raised about $800 million a year for education.

The initiative passed by a 52% to 48% margin, but a Maricopa County Superior Court judge struck down the law this year.

This initiative, of course, included raising taxes – now, due to the state’s strong financial position, about the same amount of money is potentially available without raising taxes.

In an April survey of likely Arizona voters conducted by the Center for the Future of Arizona, 82% supported increasing school funding and 65% of the total strongly supported the idea. This is a majority opinion among all political affiliations.

In the upper house, Republican Sen. Paul Boyer has called for a “big deal” on education funding that replaces Prop money. 208 through increased state funding. He said he wouldn’t vote for a budget without it.

But he is not the only Republican in this chamber to opt for a spending increase on this scale. Sen. TJ Shope, a Coolidge Republican, said Wednesday “I think it’s maybe half a dozen” of the 31 Senate Republicans who would opt for such a proposal.

He said he liked a proposal released last week that would have increased education spending by $250 million to $300 million, but he would also happily go higher.

“If there is (budgetary) capacity on an ongoing basis, we should go ahead and do more,” he said.

Rep. David Cook, a Globe Republican, told me he was more interested in paying back money still owed by the state to school districts after the 2008-09 financial crisis. He’s thinking about $600 million, but on a one-time basis.

“Let’s pay back the money we owe them,” he said. “So we’ll be in a better position next year.”

Rep. Michelle Udall, a Republican from Mesa, said she wants the Legislature to fund “a pretty big chunk” of the $900 million proposed by Boyer.

Instead, however, the latest proposal passed by a House committee is to expand the vouchers again and make increased funding conditional on voucher expansion. The bon proposal is similar to a 2017 bill that passed the Legislative Assembly only to be returned to the ballot and voted down by voters by a 65% to 35% margin in 2018.

So, in order for the majority of state voters to get some of the funding increase they want, they are being asked to swallow an extension of vouchers that they have completely rejected before.

Trump approves in AG race

As former President Donald Trump reels in endorsements in Republican primaries across the country, he made up his mind in the Arizona attorney general’s race this week.

Trump endorsed Abraham Hamadeh, a former Maricopa County prosecutor who had perhaps the most uninhibited rhetoric claiming that Trump had won the 2020 presidential election in Arizona. (He did not do it.)

“Abe Hamadeh knows what happened in the 2020 election and will enforce voting laws so that our elections are free and fair again,” Trump said in his endorsement announcement.

“Being endorsed by President Trump is the honor of a lifetime and I will not let it down,” Hamadeh said in a statement.

Five other Republicans are running for the party’s nomination to replace current Attorney General Mark Brnovich: Lacy Cooper, Rodney Glassman, Andrew Gould, Dawn Grove and Tiffany Shedd.

Gould said in a later statement, “I am aware of President Trump’s recent endorsement of my opponent. My campaign and I will not be distracted by this announcement.”

Watkins sues Rogers

Just because they’re both on the wacky right wing of Arizona politics doesn’t mean they get along.

Ron Watkins, the congressional candidate implicated in handling the QAnon conspiracy theory, filed an ethics complaint on June 10 against State Senator Wendy Rogers. He asked the ethics committee “to determine if she is fit to serve the people of Arizona due to behavior unbecoming a senator.”

He noted a series of incidents, but only one involving him: Rogers, who has already faced ethics complaints this session, posted on his online Telegram channel in February: “Dear Groyper Army, please knock Ron Watkins. Love, Wendy »

“Groyper Army” is the name of a loose association of online white supremacists, far-right nationalists and provocateurs that Rogers embraced. Watkins and Rogers quarreled over election issues.

He said in his complaint that the comment amounted to a threat against him. Of course, as the Arizona Mirror noted, Watkins himself has partnered with prominent Groypers on several occasions. And Rogers said in response that Watkins had been friendly with her for the past few months until she endorsed rival Eli Crane in the 6 Congressional District race.

Watkins is best known for being deeply involved in the posts of “Q,” an apocryphal federal employee who accused Democrats and “globalists” of being part of a Satanist pedophile ring.

Senator Sine Kerr, chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee, dismissed the complaint on Wednesday.

Contact columnist Tim Steller at tsteller@tucson.com or ​520-807-7789. On Twitter: @senyorreporter

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Bill authorizing the transfer of university savings to retirement funds https://cec-ugc.org/bill-authorizing-the-transfer-of-university-savings-to-retirement-funds/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 07:10:23 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/bill-authorizing-the-transfer-of-university-savings-to-retirement-funds/ A bipartisan bill introduced in the Senate on Tuesday would allow families to transfer unused funds from college savings accounts, or 529 accounts, without being penalized. These accounts allow families to save for their children’s education by investing after-tax income in mutual funds, much like a Roth retirement savings account. Under current law, families whose […]]]>

A bipartisan bill introduced in the Senate on Tuesday would allow families to transfer unused funds from college savings accounts, or 529 accounts, without being penalized.

These accounts allow families to save for their children’s education by investing after-tax income in mutual funds, much like a Roth retirement savings account. Under current law, families whose children decide not to go to college or do not use all the savings in the account are penalized for withdrawing unused funds.

“We should encourage parents to save for their family’s future, recognizing that they can’t always predict what the future holds. Their child may not decide to pursue higher education,” said one of the bill’s sponsors, Senator Richard Burr, a Republican from North Carolina and a senior member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, work and pensions.

The College Savings and Recovery Act, also sponsored by Bob Casey, the Pennsylvania Democrat, would eliminate these penalties and allow families to transfer funds in 529 accounts to a Roth IRA, where the money can be saved for their child’s retirement. .

“Getting started saving for retirement early can mean the difference between peace of mind and insecurity for American retirees,” Casey said of the bill.

The bill was previously included in Burr’s 2017 Boost Savings for College Act.

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APU’s Upward Bound Program Receives Five-Year, $1.5 Million Grant to Help Azusa Students Prepare for College – Media Relations https://cec-ugc.org/apus-upward-bound-program-receives-five-year-1-5-million-grant-to-help-azusa-students-prepare-for-college-media-relations/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:09:13 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/apus-upward-bound-program-receives-five-year-1-5-million-grant-to-help-azusa-students-prepare-for-college-media-relations/ Azusa Pacific University’s Upward Bound program recently received a grant from the United States Department of Education in the amount of $297,557 per year for five years, for a total of nearly $1.5 million. This grant allows APU’s Upward Bound program, now in its fifth year, to continue its important partnership with the Azusa Unified […]]]>

Azusa Pacific University’s Upward Bound program recently received a grant from the United States Department of Education in the amount of $297,557 per year for five years, for a total of nearly $1.5 million. This grant allows APU’s Upward Bound program, now in its fifth year, to continue its important partnership with the Azusa Unified School District, helping students learn the skills they need to earn their high school diploma and pursue post-secondary studies.

“Through this new grant, APU and Azusa Unified will build on our successful track record of equipping students to succeed in college,” said Armando Bustos, MS, Project Director for the Upward Program. Bound. “Education is the pathway to a better life for these students and their families. It is an honor to support them and see their academic dreams come true.

Each year, APU’s Upward Bound team serves 60 Azusa High School (AHS) students. When the outgoing class graduates, their places are filled by members of the underclass. The program is free for students. Upward Bound participants enroll in high school preparatory courses so they can apply to California state universities, University of California institutions, and private schools, including APU. They receive services including after-school tutoring, individual academic counseling, academic and career exploration, and assistance with financial and academic aid applications. Additionally, attendees can benefit from participating in Saturday Academy, a series of 16 workshops throughout the year that teach skills in areas such as financial literacy, goal setting, and essay writing. scholarships. The program also helps students explore their college options by visiting different universities each year.

Last year, 19 Upward Bound students graduated from AHS, 17 of whom enrolled in post-secondary education. Several chose to stay local, attending APU, California State, UC, or other area universities. Yerania Serrato-Bucio, valedictorian of the AHS 2021 class and mentor for members of the Upward Bound program underclass, received a full scholarship as a QuestBridge scholar and Gates scholar to study medicine at the University of Notre Dame.

“The Upward Bound program is having a transformative impact on Azusa Unified students, giving them the self-confidence and tenacity needed to succeed in high school and college,” said Arturo Ortega, Superintendent of the Unified School District of Azusa Unified. ‘Azusa. “APU has been a great partner and advocate for AUSD students. Securing an additional five years of funding opens up valuable new opportunities for our new freshmen.

In the 2020-2021 academic year, 91% of AHS Upward Bound participants had a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher; 99% continued to the next school level or obtained a regular high school diploma; and 89 percent enrolled in a post-secondary institution. “What the numbers don’t reflect is the ripple effect,” Bustos said. “Our students come mainly from low-income families. Our goal is that by going to university, they can transform the socio-economic status of their families and help them lead happy and successful lives.

“The Upward Bound grant enables APU to provide education and assistance to students who otherwise may not have the information and inspiration they need to go to college,” said Rukshan Fernando, PhD, Provost. “This work aligns directly with two of our APU cornerstones – community and service, and we are very proud of the APU Upward Bound program for the work they do and the accomplishment of receiving this grant again.”

Bustos said future plans include increasing program offerings to help more students. “We hope to expand TRIO services to other school districts. The TRIO programs represent a collection of other grants that support underrepresented first-generation students in their goals of pursuing post-secondary education,” Bustos said.

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AT&T awards $25,000 to Charles Houston’s Alexandria advisory board https://cec-ugc.org/att-awards-25000-to-charles-houstons-alexandria-advisory-board/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 22:28:18 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/att-awards-25000-to-charles-houstons-alexandria-advisory-board/ Left to right: Vice Mayor Amy Jackson, AT&T Representative, Mayor Justin Wilson and Bonnie Septon (Photo Stella Davis) ALEXANDRIA, VA – On June 8, AT&T presented a check for $25,000 to the Charles Houston Advisory Board to support the 2022-23 school year and summer coding classes for children at the Charles Houston Recreation Center (CHRC […]]]>
Left to right: Vice Mayor Amy Jackson, AT&T Representative, Mayor Justin Wilson and Bonnie Septon (Photo Stella Davis)

ALEXANDRIA, VA – On June 8, AT&T presented a check for $25,000 to the Charles Houston Advisory Board to support the 2022-23 school year and summer coding classes for children at the Charles Houston Recreation Center (CHRC ). The check presentation event featured Mayor Justin Wilson, Vice Mayor Amy Jackson and representatives from AT&T and the Advisory Board.

The $25,000 donation was part of the AT&T Foundation’s Connected Learning Initiative, a $2 billion national commitment to bridge the digital divide and help children succeed wherever they learn through investments in digital literacy tools, educational resources, low-cost Internet access, computers and Suite. Since 2008, AT&T has committed more than $600 million to millions of students nationwide and around the world, especially in underserved communities.

“AT&T has always been a company that has invested in the communities where we work, live and play,” said the AT&T representative at the event. “[This event] means a lot to us as AT&T employees and members of this community, and we want to be a leader in investing in the youth of the community.

Students at the check presentation who will benefit from summer coding classes and other educational opportunities (Photo Stella Davis)

The pandemic has presented challenges for students in Virginia and across the country who lack the sufficient connectivity, devices, or both needed for online learning. The Charles Houston Advisory Council, a group that supports CHRC through volunteerism and fundraising, has launched a program to address the digital divide and lack of homework. Today, AT&T supports their efforts to help vulnerable students in Alexandria.

The AT&T Foundation grant to the Charles Houston Advisory Council will provide critical funds for Scratch, Python and Minecraft coding lessons for financially disadvantaged children. Summer coding classes, taught by lifelong Alexandria resident Bonnie Septon, will equip kids with important and lucrative skills for future careers.

“I’ve worked in IT my entire career,” Mayor Justin Wilson said. “I know the power of this industry and the kinds of jobs it can create for [these kids] in the future. So we thank AT&T for their financial support, and we look forward to seeing some good coding underway.

Addressing the students there for the check presentation, Wilson said: “You are our future and our present. These types of resources from AT&T and others are designed to ensure you can lead the way now and in the future.

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A Q&A with the Commissioner of Education on Tennessee’s New Education Funding Formula https://cec-ugc.org/a-qa-with-the-commissioner-of-education-on-tennessees-new-education-funding-formula/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:12:23 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/a-qa-with-the-commissioner-of-education-on-tennessees-new-education-funding-formula/ Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn’s bus tour visited Ooltewah High School this week, one of 50 school district stops over three weeks to highlight learning opportunities in summer, as well as to boost the state’s new public school funding formula, the Tennessee Investment in Student Achievement. She followed the visit with an interview with the […]]]>

Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn’s bus tour visited Ooltewah High School this week, one of 50 school district stops over three weeks to highlight learning opportunities in summer, as well as to boost the state’s new public school funding formula, the Tennessee Investment in Student Achievement.

She followed the visit with an interview with the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

The new funding formula will inject a one-time investment of $250 million into education spending across the state starting this fall. After that, $750 million in recurring funds will be distributed in fiscal years 2023 and 2024.

The formula is weighted according to the student. It starts at a base amount of $6,860 per student and then includes additional funding for students’ unique individual needs, such as those on low incomes or with disabilities. The formula also allocates direct funds to support areas such as early literacy, vocational and technical education programs, one-on-one tutoring and charter schools.

Hamilton County schools are set to receive $397 million in fiscal year 2024, $47 million more than the $350 million the system will receive this school year, according to Department of Education projections. of State.

At the event, state officials, education officials and students touted the new formula’s focus on equity. Here’s what Schwinn had to say about formula weighting.

Q. How does the formula work?

A. The formula takes into account the needs of each student. And so if you’re a student who has additional needs, or maybe a student that extra support is going to help you, you get more money. So, let’s say you are a student who speaks a language other than English, this is something that will compel your school to do more for you. So, we give that student an extra boost of 40-60% more. If you are a low-income student and may need additional resources to meet these grade level expectations, we will make sure to give you more, and in this case it is a 25% increase . The formula is really constructed, instead of the average of all the students in a district, it actually says, “How much does each child need to make sure the district and the school can buy the resources and supports and teachers and all of those things that will help this child learn? »

Q. If a student changes schools, does the formula change?

A. The good news is that no matter which public school that student goes to, that amount generated by that child is what moves. Let’s say they moved from East Tennessee to West Tennessee for college and they have $12,500 that the formula generates for them. Their new district would have $12,500, as would their old district.

Q. On Monday, the Tennessee Department of Education released the proposed rules for the formula, however, they are a bit difficult for the layman to decipher. How can people better understand the rules?

A. The rules are essentially one: reaffirm the law. And then two: it’s another legal way to drill down a layer into more detail. So this will explain for the districts: this is how we will determine who qualifies as a student with a disability or a student who speaks a language other than English. Or here is the technical process for submitting data and how often you will hear you will get feedback or results in the department.

And then the ministry will produce a guide. And this guide puts it in simple terms: here’s what the formula will generate for you. Here are some strategic ways to invest those dollars. Here are the best practices.

Q. When will the guide be released?

A. We are looking at the very beginning of fall. So once we have the rules, we can produce the guide. The guide will be based on what those final submissions are.

Q. In Hamilton County, the school district has approximately $1 billion in deferred building repairs. How does the new formula help schools with infrastructure needs?

A. Districts will be able to have the flexibility to spend the money as they see fit for the children. And so, with a district like Hamilton County receiving over $40 million in new funding, I think that’s a really important and critical addition to any number of investments that they might want to make. Some of them will be academic. Some of them could expand their amazing high school and CTE (vocational and technical education) programs. And some of them will be things like deferred maintenance and capital expenditures. So the beauty is that this formula doesn’t really try to force or push people into certain types of spending. He says local districts should be empowered to spend the money however they see fit for their local communities.

Contact Carmen Nesbitt at cnesbitt@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6327. Follow her on Twitter @carmen_nesbitt.

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Ellwood Wolves Club awards scholarships | Local News https://cec-ugc.org/ellwood-wolves-club-awards-scholarships-local-news/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 05:54:29 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/ellwood-wolves-club-awards-scholarships-local-news/ The Ellwood City Wolves Club held their annual scholarship dinner on May 26 at the Connoquenessing Country Club. Members of Wolves Club Den II came together to celebrate the awarding of $15,935 in scholarships to six members of the Class of 2022 from Lincoln and Riverside High Schools and two current students to help fund […]]]>

The Ellwood City Wolves Club held their annual scholarship dinner on May 26 at the Connoquenessing Country Club.

Members of Wolves Club Den II came together to celebrate the awarding of $15,935 in scholarships to six members of the Class of 2022 from Lincoln and Riverside High Schools and two current students to help fund their higher education.

“Higher education puts students on the path to many different careers. This commitment to higher education will make them more competitive in the job market. We are honored to help them so they can achieve their dreams for a successful future,” commented Wolves Club President Mike DeOtto.

Wolves Club manager Denny Boariu was the evening’s emcee and gave an overview of the aims and commitment of the scholarship committee to this year’s scholarships. He mentioned that there are a total of 11 Wolves Cub Dens and over the years nine million dollars in scholarships have been awarded.

Boariu also spoke about several upcoming events including the July 2-4 festival, Oktoberfest and the upcoming 75th anniversary of Wolves Club Den ll in 2023.

Scholarships presented to Lincoln High students include:

•A $5,000 scholarship awarded to Mark Van Horn, son of Randy Van Horn and Renee Pitrelli of Ellwood City. He plans to attend Grove City College and major in electrical engineering.

• A $1,200 scholarship funded by Dennis Gottusso, winner of a Wolves Club scholarship in 1978, presented to Tyunna Jordan. She is the daughter of Natasha Hall of Ellwood City. She will attend Robert Morris University and major in business management.

•A $1,000 scholarship awarded to Emma Wise in memory of longtime Wolves Club member Sam Teolis. She is the daughter of Gina and Ray Wise of Ellwood City. She plans to attend Penn State University and major in General Studies.

Community College of Beaver County student Jordan Halstead received a $750 scholarship. She specializes in nursing.

A $785 scholarship was awarded to Scarlett Hazen, a student at Butler County Community College.

Lincoln teacher and school counselor April Thellman presented the Lincoln seniors awards and CCBC development associate/assistant to the president Leanne Condro presented the CCBC award.

For their contributions to the scholarship and grant program, a special note of appreciation was expressed on behalf of the Wolves Club by Master of Ceremonies Boariu to Gottuso and the Teolis and Agostinelli families.

Members of the club’s scholarship committee are Nick Mancini, chairman, Frank Aloi, John DiBuono, Chris Cioffi, Hank Glogowski and Herman Petti Jr., coordinator. Reverend Todd Custer, pastor of Christ Presbyterian Church, gave the invocation and blessing.

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NIU today | Hope Chicago and NIU will provide debt-free higher education for future Huskies https://cec-ugc.org/niu-today-hope-chicago-and-niu-will-provide-debt-free-higher-education-for-future-huskies/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 14:58:25 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/niu-today-hope-chicago-and-niu-will-provide-debt-free-higher-education-for-future-huskies/ Northern Illinois University announces official partnership with Hope Chicago, the innovative two-generation college scholarship program committed to investing $1 billion over the next decade in post-secondary scholarships for Chicago students Public School (CPS) and their parents. The partnership will support inaugural participants of the Hope Scholar cohort from five CPS partner high schools: Benito Juárez […]]]>

Northern Illinois University announces official partnership with Hope Chicago, the innovative two-generation college scholarship program committed to investing $1 billion over the next decade in post-secondary scholarships for Chicago students Public School (CPS) and their parents.

The partnership will support inaugural participants of the Hope Scholar cohort from five CPS partner high schools: Benito Juárez Community Academy (Pilsen); Farragut Career Academy (Small Village); Noble – Johnson College Prep (Englewood); Al Raby School for Community and Environment (Garfield Park); and Morgan Park High School (Morgan Park).

NIU joins more than 20 other Illinois institutions of higher education in partnership with Hope Chicago, a nonprofit organization that seeks to reduce economic and social inequality. Hope Scholars coming to NIU this fall will be eligible for the full range of comprehensive supports offered by the nonprofit organization.

Hope Scholars will receive a “gap-filling scholarship,” which means that Hope Chicago will pay for any costs not already covered by other grants or scholarships. This includes tuition, room and board, books, fees and supplements. Hope Scholars will also receive a laptop, stipend, and access to emergency funds for unforeseen expenses that may be barriers to their success, as well as transition support, academic and social/emotional supports and exclusive access to dedicated support staff.

“We know that the transition of any scholar to a new post-secondary setting is a critical moment in time,” said Michele Howard, Hope Chicago program manager. “That’s why we’re thrilled to have such deep relationships in place with our partner universities that guarantee deep support for our first cohort of Hope Scholars enrolling this fall.”

In February, Hope Chicago visited its first five CPS partner high schools on the south, southwest, and west sides of the city, promising 4,000 students and one parent/guardian of each student access to debt-free higher education. With future cohorts in the works, the partnership with Hope Chicago opens the door for more CPS graduates and their families to experience the world-class education NIU has to offer.

“NIU has made a significant investment in the talents of CPS graduates, with financial aid and scholarship offers that have more than doubled CPS freshman enrollment in the past five years,” said Sol Jensen, NIU vice president for enrollment. Management, Marketing and Communication.

“This partnership between NIU and Hope Chicago is transformative,” he added. “It will build on our past efforts, help provide a top-notch NIU education to more CPS students, and help them focus on their studies and success by removing financial burdens for their entire college career. .”

Other higher education institutions partnering with Hope Chicago include University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois Chicago, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago State University, Eastern Illinois University, Western Illinois University, Illinois State University, and Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

“We know that a college degree is the most powerful tool anyone can use to maximize their career opportunities,” added Hope Chicago Executive Director Dr. Janice Jackson. “That’s why we aim to be a game-changer and redefine the college experience for our scholars in collaboration with our partner institutions.”

For more information about Hope Chicago, visit www.hopechicago.org.

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