Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:54:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Daughter and Father Team Up for Great Lakes Literacy https://cec-ugc.org/daughter-and-father-team-up-for-great-lakes-literacy/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:08:42 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/daughter-and-father-team-up-for-great-lakes-literacy/ Liz Thomson, a first-grade teacher at Alcona Community Schools College, is credited with giving her 120 seventh and eighth graders a hands-on study of water and coastal wetlands through a grant from the State of Michigan. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) featured Thomson and his father, fellow teacher Bob Thomson, in a profile on […]]]>

Liz Thomson, a first-grade teacher at Alcona Community Schools College, is credited with giving her 120 seventh and eighth graders a hands-on study of water and coastal wetlands through a grant from the State of Michigan. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) featured Thomson and his father, fellow teacher Bob Thomson, in a profile on its website.

Alcona is one of 16 schools or districts in Michigan to share $205,028 in grant funds to develop Great Lakes-based science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs. Liz Thomson’s project received $6,892 to expand what’s called 3-P (problem-, place-, and project-based) learning by studying coastal and wetland habitats.

Liz Thomson (standing right with her father) participated in the Thunder Bay Watershed Project taught by her father, Bob Thomson. (Credit: Brandon Schroeder, Michigan Sea Grant)

Liz’s father is her mentor teacher and a longtime teacher with the Center for Great Lakes Literacy (CGLL) network, a network run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Sea Grant that engages in learning collective to promote Great Lakes literacy among educators and students. . In 2017, he was named Science Educator of the Year by the Michigan Science Teachers Association. When Liz was a student at Alpena Public Schools, she participated in Bob’s Thunder Bay Watershed Project, monitoring water quality, monitoring invasive species, studying marine debris, helping restore native fish populations, and Moreover.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced state funding in June 2022 to support freshwater literacy efforts and prepare students for STEM careers.

“These grants will support freshwater literacy programs and provide students with access to real-world STEM experiences,” the governor said in a statement. “Our Great Lakes are our greatest asset, and we need to empower young people in Michigan to learn more about them and continue to advance conservation efforts. Michigan’s economic competitiveness depends on a STEM-skilled workforce committed to solving our greatest challenges. Investments like these will help prepare our children to lead our state into the future.

Governor Whitmer’s office created the grant funding in conjunction with the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) and Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity (LEO), continuing the 2020 From Students to Stewards initiative and 2021 MiSTEM Transformative Playbook Grants.

“This ongoing partnership between EGLE and LEO supports students and educators with new and innovative approaches to STEM education to help fill our state’s talent gap and prepare our students for in-demand career paths in the STEM fields and beyond,” LEO Director Susan Corbin said in a statement.

EGLE Director Liesl Clark called the funding an investment in Michigan’s future leadership.

“These innovative educational programs and experiences will shape tomorrow’s advocates, policymakers, and champions who will value and protect Michigan’s waterways and watersheds,” Clark said in a statement.

The Alcona Project is also supported by Michigan Sea Grant through the CGLL Teacher Mentorship Program and NOAA, with financial support from GLRI, the Local Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative of Northeast Michigan, and of the state MiSTEM network.

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State Tribal Education Compact Demonstration Tribal Partner Grant Update https://cec-ugc.org/state-tribal-education-compact-demonstration-tribal-partner-grant-update/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 19:56:52 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/state-tribal-education-compact-demonstration-tribal-partner-grant-update/ Photo courtesy of Alaska Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Juneau, Alaska (KINY) – DEED is inviting applications (RFA) for the State Tribal Education Compaction Demonstration Tribal Partner Grants. The Alaska Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEED) has identified five positive goals that have been articulated as the Alaska Education Challenge. DEED […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Alaska Department of Education and Early Childhood Development

Juneau, Alaska (KINY) – DEED is inviting applications (RFA) for the State Tribal Education Compaction Demonstration Tribal Partner Grants.

The Alaska Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEED) has identified five positive goals that have been articulated as the Alaska Education Challenge.

DEED is issuing a Request for Applications (RFA) for the State Tribal Education Compaction Demonstration Tribal Partner Grants. They seek nominations based on geographic representation, variety of educational methodologies, representation from schools and communities of different sizes, and overall statewide representation.

Their intention is to have a demonstration project to show how State-Tribal Education Compact schools can operate across Alaska.

The mission of the demonstration phase is to conduct a more permanent and widely available variety of education compaction process.

Additionally, this RFA asks potential subrecipients to provide a tribal partnership with the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development (SBOE) to support the development of a report to the Alaska Legislature on what is required legislatively to create state tribal education compacts.

This is part of the implementation of Senate Bill 34.

Applications are due December 31 at 5:00 p.m. AKST. The app is available here.

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    Juneau, Alaska (KINY) – The bike and pedestrian path near the Salmon Creek intersection in Juneau will be closed for repairs Nov. 17 and 18 from 4 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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Ohio County Reviewing Super Six Grant Amounts | News, Sports, Jobs https://cec-ugc.org/ohio-county-reviewing-super-six-grant-amounts-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:02:02 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/ohio-county-reviewing-super-six-grant-amounts-news-sports-jobs/ picture by: Joselyn King Ohio County Development Authority member John Gearry, left, County Commissioner Don Nickerson and Commission Chairman Randy Wharton sit at Tuesday’s meeting of the Ohio County Development Authority Ohio county. WHEELING — The Ohio County Commissioners and the Ohio County Development Authority will jointly contribute $30,000 to […]]]>

picture by: Joselyn King

Ohio County Development Authority member John Gearry, left, County Commissioner Don Nickerson and Commission Chairman Randy Wharton sit at Tuesday’s meeting of the Ohio County Development Authority Ohio county.

WHEELING — The Ohio County Commissioners and the Ohio County Development Authority will jointly contribute $30,000 to the upcoming West Virginia High Schools Activities Commission Super Six Football Championships to be held in Wheeling next month, and it has led county officials to think they might need to set a line item for how much the county distributes in community grants each year.

At their Nov. 1 meeting, county commissioners first passed a motion to award the Super Six committee a community grant of $20,000.

On Tuesday, a similar request for $10,000 was made to the OCDA, a board of which county commissioners are also members.

The request was approved, but the commissioners wonder if they should monitor the results of the grant applications.

“Between the county commission and the development authority, we’re $30,000 in (the Super Six),” said commissioner Randy Wharton, who is also chairman of the OCDA. “Next year we will probably have discussions with the people who put this up. And we have to help them find other sources of income, or other advertisers or supporters so that we (don’t have to contribute as much).

“We want to do what we can for them, but it’s a lot of money.”

County Administrator Randy Russell said he had discussions with Super Six Committee Director Dwaine Rodgers, who told him that sponsorships for state high school football championships “have gone down at the over the years”.

“We talked about maybe some new faces coming next year and in the years to come, and maybe coming back after past sponsorships,” Russell said.

It is expected that at least two teams taking part in the next Super Six will be accommodated in hotels in the Highlands if they win their playoff matches, and will also use the Highlands Sports Center for training sessions. This would result in tax and other revenue for the county, Russell continued.

“I think there’s work to be done on the things they’re spending money on,” commissioner Zach Abraham said. He noted that the committee had submitted details of its budget to the county and that its demands accounted for about a third of its overall budget.

Abraham, however, called the Super Six a “benefit to the community” and said he would welcome helping them find additional sponsors.

Also on Tuesday, the OCDA Board of Directors approved a request from the Wheeling Nailers for a corporate sponsorship of $20,000, as well as an additional $5,000 to help with Wheeling Nailers Education Day. – when local school students attend a hockey game during the day.

Requests from the Nailers and the Super Six committee have not exceeded previous requests granted by county agencies in recent years, Russell confirmed.

Wharton suggested that the commission and the OCDA establish an annual budget line for block grant applications beginning next year.

“These are important requests…,” he said. “We also operate a hall, and it costs money to operate it.

“We will do everything we can to help everyone. But we have to remember that we are running a business here. It’s not the (federal) government,” Wharton added.



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Adirondack Foundation Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund grants promote access and equity in local sports and recreation – https://cec-ugc.org/adirondack-foundation-uihlein-ironman-sports-fund-grants-promote-access-and-equity-in-local-sports-and-recreation/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 18:35:09 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/adirondack-foundation-uihlein-ironman-sports-fund-grants-promote-access-and-equity-in-local-sports-and-recreation/ LAKE PLACID- The Adirondack Foundation’s Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund (UISF) has awarded more than $25,000 in grants to community organizations working to advance equity and access to local sports and recreation. In addition to the eight organizations that received UISF grants this year, four scholarships totaling $4,750 were awarded to aspiring athletes from the Olympic region. […]]]>

LAKE PLACID- The Adirondack Foundation’s Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund (UISF) has awarded more than $25,000 in grants to community organizations working to advance equity and access to local sports and recreation. In addition to the eight organizations that received UISF grants this year, four scholarships totaling $4,750 were awarded to aspiring athletes from the Olympic region.

“This fund has always strived to foster and promote lifelong sports and healthy lifestyles for local children,” said Mara Smith of the UISF Grants Committee. “Our winners this year speak to the very heart of why UISF was created. We live in a place rich with opportunities for outdoor recreation, but we sometimes take for granted the barriers that exist for many children and families – barriers like the cost of equipment and the basic knowledge needed to participate safely. safety in certain activities. This committee continues to be encouraged and excited by all the different people and organizations working to create opportunities to increase access and participation in the venues and sports that are such important aspects of our communities.

Organizations and programs that received grants this year include:

● The Adirondack Health Foundation, to provide scholarships for swimming lessons and
drowning prevention for income-eligible students.
● The Adirondack Sports Council’s Mac Pac program, an immersion program for Lake
placid K-8 students attending the World University Games.
● The Lake Placid Community Ski Program, to provide cross-country skiing after school
classes for primary school students.
● Lake Placid Outing Club’s Youth Hiking Program, to introduce children to
backpacking in the Adirondacks.
● The New York Ski Educational Foundation, for the purchase of equipment for its Nordic Junior
Program.
● Paul Smith’s College, to increase opportunities for recreation and environmental education
for children and young people from kindergarten to high school.
● Saranac Lake Civic Center to provide free public skating to the community.
● The City of Franklin, to purchase regulation soccer goals for Kate Mountain Park.

The Lake Placid Outing Club Youth Hiking Program received support from the Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund this year to introduce local children to hiking in the Adirondacks. (Photo credit: Lake Placid Outing Club) Photo courtesy of Chris Morris.

In addition to supporting communities, the UISF allocates funds each year to promising young athletes at the national and international level. Olympians such as Tim Burke, Chris Mazdzer, Annelies Cook and Billy Demong have received scholarships over the years.

“Athletes in sports like biathlon, alpine and nordic skiing, and speed skating often don’t receive the same level of financial support as more traditional sports like football, soccer, and hockey,” Smith said. “For young athletes in our region, the economic challenges of advancing to the next level are often as difficult as the physical challenges.

Athletes receiving support this year include:

● Cole VanEtten, alpine skiing
● Bella Wissler, nordic skiing and biathlon
● Andrew Scanio, nordic skiing
● Kaylen Reiley, freeski slopestyle & big air

Biathlete and Nordic skier Bella Wissler received support from the Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund this year, giving her a boost as she pursues her goals at the national level. (Photo credit: Nancie Battaglia) Photo courtesy of Chris Morris.

Nordic skier Andrew Scanio has received financial support from the Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund this year to support him as he competes on the national stage. (Photo credit: Nancie Battaglia) Photo courtesy of Chris Morris.

The UISF was created by the Henry Uihlein II and Mildred A. Uihlein Foundation, Ironman North America (now known as the World Triathlon Corporation), and the Adirondack Foundation, which administers the fund. Since its inception in 2006, the fund has awarded nearly 300 grants totaling more than $536,000.

For more information, contact Andrea Grout at (518) 523-9904 or andrea@adkfoundation.org. To learn more about the Adirondack Foundation, visit adirondackfoundation.org.

Top photo: A grant from the Uihlein-Ironman Sports Fund supported the purchase of new equipment for the NYSEF Junior Nordic Program. (Photo credit: Nancie Battaglia) Photo courtesy of Chris Morris.

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Inflation will erode funding for early childhood care, says IFS | early childhood education https://cec-ugc.org/inflation-will-erode-funding-for-early-childhood-care-says-ifs-early-childhood-education/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/inflation-will-erode-funding-for-early-childhood-care-says-ifs-early-childhood-education/ The rapid pace of inflation will significantly erode funding for early childhood care in nurseries and daycare centers over the next three years, according to a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies. The IFS said funding for childcare places in England will actually fall by 8% by 2024-25 due to inflation, with providers facing […]]]>

The rapid pace of inflation will significantly erode funding for early childhood care in nurseries and daycare centers over the next three years, according to a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The IFS said funding for childcare places in England will actually fall by 8% by 2024-25 due to inflation, with providers facing a 16% cost increase over this period , mainly due to the increase in the wage bill.

Elaine Drayton, one of the authors of the IFS report, said governments had prioritized early childhood spending over the past decade, with new childcare rights for disadvantaged children from two-year-olds and for three- and four-year-olds in working families. , and the expansion of supply at a time when other public services were being cut.

“But early childhood providers are facing rapidly rising costs that are eroding the value of their budgets. Costs for child care providers had already risen faster than economy-wide inflation in recent years, but they face an even greater increase in the years to come” , Drayton said.

“This will leave government funding for the free childcare scheme well below what was projected when the budget was last set in 2021.”

The result is that the significant increase in the 2021 spending review – up to £3.75billion a year through 2024-25, covering the universal right to 15 hours of childcare per week , rising to 30 hours for many working parents – will be negated by higher than expected inflation.

Neil Leitch, Chief Executive of the Early Years Alliance, said: “We know that early years providers are deeply committed to providing high quality education for our youngest children, as well as the childcare on which many many parents matter – but that alone isn’t enough to pay the bills and keep the doors open.

“The fact is, the early childhood funding system in this country is broken and the way the government views and treats our vital sector needs an urgent rethink before it completely implodes.”

Kevin Courtney, co-general secretary of the National Education Union, said its members were warning nursery closures were inevitable ‘unless the government intervenes’ and announced additional financial support for the sector in the budget of the next week.

Bridget Phillipson, the shadow education secretary, said the IFS analysis highlighted the need to build a “new modern childcare system”.

‘The fall in the value of childcare aid means parents will face even higher bills or more child care closures, all because the Tories have taken the economy down’ , Phillipson said.

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SeaWorld awards 10 emergency grants to wildlife organizations impacted by Hurricane Ian https://cec-ugc.org/seaworld-awards-10-emergency-grants-to-wildlife-organizations-impacted-by-hurricane-ian/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 23:09:17 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/seaworld-awards-10-emergency-grants-to-wildlife-organizations-impacted-by-hurricane-ian/ Pavilion of Lemurs at the Naples Zoo. Photo courtesy of SeaWorld Conservation Fund In response to the damage caused by Hurricane Ian, the SeaWorld Conservation Fund provided emergency grants to 10 Florida zoological and wildlife rescue organizations affected by the storm. These emergency grants will help facilitate recovery efforts and directly benefit a variety of […]]]>
Pavilion of Lemurs at the Naples Zoo. Photo courtesy of SeaWorld Conservation Fund

In response to the damage caused by Hurricane Ian, the SeaWorld Conservation Fund provided emergency grants to 10 Florida zoological and wildlife rescue organizations affected by the storm.

These emergency grants will help facilitate recovery efforts and directly benefit a variety of animal species, including big cats, iguanas, lemurs, seabirds, sea turtles, wolves and others.

Since its inception as a nonprofit foundation in 2003, the SeaWorld Conservation Fund has awarded grants to 1,391 organizations on seven continents. Earlier this year, the Fund topped $19 million in grants to support projects for marine animals, ocean health and conservation.

“SeaWorld is proud to support our fellow zoological and rescue facilities impacted by Hurricane Ian,” said Dr. Chris Dold, Chairman of the SeaWorld Conservation Fund. “We are all part of an essential wildlife protection ecosystem, and we are grateful to have the ability to step up and help others who share our commitment to protecting wildlife.”

One of the recipients of an emergency grant is the Zoological Disaster Rescue, Response and Recovery (ZDR3), the largest zoological response organization in the United States. They provide support to zoos, aquariums, sanctuaries and other animal welfare organizations before, during and after significant incidents.

Julia Wagner, Executive Director of Zoological Disaster Rescue, Response and Recovery (ZDR3) said, “Hurricane Ian caused catastrophic damage to the Florida community and significant damage to wildlife facilities statewide. We are seeing a substantial impact on many facilities and on wildlife that will need support in the weeks and months ahead. These groups need all the help they can get. The SeaWorld Conservation Fund grant to our organization will go directly to the wildlife protection community so that we can help as many groups as possible on their long road to repair, rebuild and reopen.

The storm also affected area zoos, including the Naples Zoo which is also a recipient of an emergency grant from the SeaWorld Conservation Fund. Commenting on the grant, Lee Ann Rottman, Director of Animal Programs at Naples Zoo, said, “Like many groups in the area, our habitats have been damaged by wind and rain and this grant is incredibly helpful to our animals and our teams. This will help provide urgent habitat and exhibit repairs, tree removal, fencing replacement and erosion repair, which is important in keeping our animals healthy and safe.

Most organizations applying for a SeaWorld emergency grant have suffered damaged fences, major flooding, habitat destruction, wind damage, and other storm-related issues. These have rendered many of their recovery and long-term care habitats unusable.

Save our seabirds rescues and rehabilitates sick and injured seabirds with the goal of releasing them back to their original habitats. They too will receive an emergency grant. “Hurricane Ian is one of the most significant disasters Florida has ever seen, and the impact on our seabirds is immense,” said Aaron Virgin, CEO of Save Our Seabirds. “The SeaWorld Conservation Fund grant will allow us to build temporary housing for our brown pelicans and permanent housing for our great blue herons, as their habitats were severely damaged by the storm.”

Other emergency grants awarded to zoological and wildlife rescue and rehabilitation organizations include:

  • Big Cat Habitat and Gulf Coast Sanctuary: a forever home for dozens of exotic animals, provides placement for animals in need, and works to educate the public about animal care and conservation.
  • Central Florida Zoo and Botanical Gardens: a conservation resource offering experiences that excite and inspire children and adults to learn and take action on behalf of wildlife.
  • Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic (CROW): a teaching hospital and visitor education center dedicated to saving wildlife through advanced veterinary care, research, education and conservation medicine.
  • Iguana Land: a reptile zoo, education and conservation center, founded by herpetologist and conservationist Ty Park.
  • Lemur Conservation Foundation: dedicated to the preservation and conservation of the primates of Madagascar through managed breeding, scientific research, education and art.
  • Shy Wolf Sanctuary: rescue exotic, non-releasable wildlife bred in captivity and provide forever homes for those in need of sanctuary.
  • Bailey-Matthews National Seashell Museum: a natural history museum that educates, inspires, builds community, and connects people through their love of seashells, the various animals that create them, and the natural environment.

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“Sky’s the limit” for Cedar Rapids Magnetic Schools with nearly $15 million grant https://cec-ugc.org/skys-the-limit-for-cedar-rapids-magnetic-schools-with-nearly-15-million-grant/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/skys-the-limit-for-cedar-rapids-magnetic-schools-with-nearly-15-million-grant/ Eighth graders Maliah Richards (left) and Maya Patterson scratch the back of their model of the human heart Thursday at McKinley STEAM Academy in Cedar Rapids. The Magnet School adds a pathway for students to explore careers in the medical field. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette) Eight students Kobe Sindt (left) and Artrell Beard power the tubes […]]]>

Eighth graders Maliah Richards (left) and Maya Patterson scratch the back of their model of the human heart Thursday at McKinley STEAM Academy in Cedar Rapids. The Magnet School adds a pathway for students to explore careers in the medical field. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

Eight students Kobe Sindt (left) and Artrell Beard power the tubes Thursday through their model of the human heart at McKinley STEAM Academy in Cedar Rapids. Magnet School, located near the city’s two hospitals, plans to add programs that help its students explore healthcare careers. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

Johnson STEAM Academy student Lena DeSouza practices Thursday with her teacher, Catie Moritz, during her second violin lesson at Johnson STEAM Academy Magnet School in Cedar Rapids. The school, which focuses on integrating the arts, this year brought back private music lessons for students in grades three through five who want to learn keyboard, guitar or violin. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

Johnson STEAM Academy student Gionni Greer practices the violin during her private music lesson Thursday with her teacher, Catie Moritz, at Johnson STEAM Academy Magnet School in Cedar Rapids. Thanks to a portion of a federal grant, teachers there will receive professional development on how to incorporate the arts – such as dance, music and visual arts – into their classrooms. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

Johnson STEAM Academy student Gionni Greer practices violin Thursday during her private music class at Johnson STEAM Academy Magnet School in Cedar Rapids. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

Johnson STEAM Academy student Lena DeSouza smiles Thursday after a successful practice session during her private violin lesson at Johnson STEAM Academy Magnet School in Cedar Rapids. (Geoff Stellfox/The Gazette)

CEDAR RAPIDS – Cedar Rapids Middle School – McKinley STEAM Academy – Adds Pathway for Students to Explore Medical Careers as Part of $14.8 Million Federal Grant Distributed to Magnet Schools in the District .

At another college, the Roosevelt Creative Corridor Business Academy, leaders dream of opening a student-run cafe as part of its entrepreneurial theme. Produce grown in the school’s indoor greenhouse could be used in food served at the cafe.

“All those times we said ‘if the sky was the limit’ or ‘if money was no object’ – now we’re looking at these projects as if they could really happen,” said Kate Riley , magnet coordinator at Roosevelt.

The grant makes school leaders’ dreams possible instead of ideas “going to waste” due to lack of funding – and improves student achievement, said McKinley Magnet School coordinator Ted Olander.

At McKinley, college students could walk away with certification in CPR — an emergency lifesaving procedure performed when the heart stops beating — and tangible experiences in health care. The school’s downtown location – across from Mercy Medical Center and near UnityPoint Health-St. Luke’s Hospital – makes it a good candidate for adding a medical pathway, Olander said.

Already, students are studying the human body by creating a model of the heart using a laser cutter and 3D printer.

Federal grant of $14.8 million

The district is the first in Iowa to receive a federal grant for magnet schools — $14.8 million to be spread over the next five years. It will support improvements to four of the district’s existing magnet schools – Johnson STEAM Academy, Cedar River Academy, Roosevelt and McKinley and a new magnet high school called City View Community.

Kenwood Leadership Academy – a magnet elementary school – was not included in the grant because the school is already making progress academically and seeing integration, said Adam Zimmermann, executive director of grade level education. intermediate.

Magnet schools are a program in a public school that creates a special area of ​​study. The Cedar Rapids Community School District has five magnet schools whose themes include sustainability, science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM), and leadership. Magnets also help desegregate schools and improve learning outcomes through themed experiences, Zimmermann said.

Investing in the arts and sustainability

The other magnet schools in the district use the grant to develop their themes.

Johnson STEAM Academy focuses on integrating the arts. Already, the school has brought back private music lessons this year for students in grades three through five who want to learn keyboard, guitar or violin. Although there is a “small fee” for these courses, scholarships are available for students who need them, said Sarah Jones, magnet school coordinator at Johnson STEAM Academy. Instruments are also provided while students learn.

The school also plans to launch an artist-in-residence program, bringing in musical or visual artists for a short period each to provide hands-on learning.

Through the grant, teachers will benefit from professional development on how to incorporate the arts – such as dance, music and visual arts – into their classrooms.

Teachers at Cedar River Academy — which has a sustainability theme — will receive professional learning to become “sustainability experts” with help from the grant, said Liz Callahan, magnetic school coordinator at Cedar. River Academy.

Students continue to learn about sustainability with many field trips. Last month, the students visited the urban farm at Matthew 25 in Cedar Rapids, where they learned about urban agriculture and tasted kale, Swiss chard and grapes. Grant funding will help pay for transportation for these trips.

A few years ago, the students became the first in the district to compost schoolwide. The majority of materials discarded by students and staff are recycled or composted.

City View High School

The district plans to open its first magnet high school next year, called City View Community School, which will expand its offering beyond elementary and middle schools. The location of the school has not been announced, but the district said it would be downtown.

The federal grant will be used to help get the school off the ground. The district is setting aside money to start the school and has received other grants, but it will eventually be funded through the usual per-pupil student aid.

At City View, high school students will engage in project-based learning. Up to 200 mostly rising 9th and 10th graders will be able to enroll in City View for the 2023-2024 school year. The school will eventually serve up to 400 students from ninth through 12th grade. The other high schools in Cedar Rapids have between 1,300 and 1,700 students each.

Open school lottery magnet

A lottery for City View is currently open and the magnet elementary and middle school lottery will open at 8 a.m. Monday.

Students who live in the resident area of ​​the magnet do not need to enter the lottery to register.

The lottery is a random, computer-generated process to select and accept students who live outside the magnet’s attendance limits. To enter the lottery, go to crschools.us/schools/magnet-schools/magnet-school-lottery.

Comments: (319) 398-8411; grace.king@thegazette.com

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Georgia Southern Institute Obtains Two OSHA Grants to Mitigate COVID-19 and Educate Georgia’s Farming Community https://cec-ugc.org/georgia-southern-institute-obtains-two-osha-grants-to-mitigate-covid-19-and-educate-georgias-farming-community/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 20:59:38 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/georgia-southern-institute-obtains-two-osha-grants-to-mitigate-covid-19-and-educate-georgias-farming-community/ Home > Press Releases > Georgia Southern Institute Awarded Two OSHA Grants to Mitigate COVID-19 and Educate Georgia’s Agricultural Community November 3, 2022 The U.S. Department of Labor and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has awarded Georgia Southern University’s Institute for Health Logistics & Analytics (IHLA) two grants totaling more than $310,000 to provide […]]]>

The U.S. Department of Labor and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has awarded Georgia Southern University’s Institute for Health Logistics & Analytics (IHLA) two grants totaling more than $310,000 to provide training and education to help agribusiness owners and agricultural workers in Georgia. .

OSHA’s Susan Harwood Training Grant Program funds grants to nonprofit organizations each year from congressional appropriations with the goal of improving worker health. At Georgia Southern, these grants will fund agribusiness training and education and help prepare owners and workers for future zoonotic disease outbreaks using a “One Health” approach.

“Infectious diseases can have a significant impact on the agricultural sector, ranging from market disruptions to employee absenteeism,” said Jessica Schwind, Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiology and director of IHLA. “Agribusiness owners and agricultural workers, especially those in livestock and poultry containment agriculture, should be educated on various topics related to infectious diseases and appropriate precautionary measures to reduce the potential for transmission. .”

The One Health approach recognizes that the health of humans, animals and our common environment are interconnected. Through increased cooperation, communication and collaboration between the human, animal and environmental sectors, IHLA sees the One Health approach as a crucial component to improving planetary health, Schwind said.

In furtherance of this mission, IHLA recently partnered with Georgia Grown, a marketing and economic development program of the Georgia Department of Agriculture, to raise awareness of One Health at this year’s Georgia State Fair. in Perry, Georgia, and Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie. , Georgia. An educational exhibit educated visitors on the importance of the human-animal bond and the many ways our health depends on healthy animals and healthy environments. Community outreach collaborations such as these are what make OSHA grants more impactful when awarded.

“We are thrilled to partner with the agricultural community across the state of Georgia to bring evidence-based One Health approaches to farms and fields, not only to keep those working in agriculture safe. -industry, but also for the health of animals and our communities,” says Jill Johns. , project manager at IHLA. “We are grateful for the opportunity to work with OSHA to make this happen.”

For more information about IHLA, visit https://research.georgiasouthern.edu/health-logistics/ or email ihla@georgiasouthern.edu.



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Breaking down WA Schools Funding Formula https://cec-ugc.org/breaking-down-wa-schools-funding-formula/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 12:02:10 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/breaking-down-wa-schools-funding-formula/ How does the state calculate how much money to send to schools? While the state distributed about $14,556 per student in 2019-20, according to federal data, there is not a one-to-one relationship between each student and that amount. Many factors go into the funding formula. Student population size is an obvious part of the equation, […]]]>

How does the state calculate how much money to send to schools?

While the state distributed about $14,556 per student in 2019-20, according to federal data, there is not a one-to-one relationship between each student and that amount. Many factors go into the funding formula.

Student population size is an obvious part of the equation, but other factors include community poverty levels, special educational needs, and differences in the local cost of living that affect educator salaries, all of which may result in additional state funding.

Washington has created what it calls a “prototype model” for schools. The state provides funding that is calculated to be sufficient for a number of teachers, principals, librarians, teaching aides, nurses, and other staff based on the student population. The Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), the agency that oversees K-12 public instruction in the state, then distributes money to districts based on what that endowment would be. minimum.

For example, for 400 students in pre-K-6 grades, a district would receive sufficient funding for 1.2 building administrators such as a principal or vice-principal, 0.6 librarians, 0.49 guidance counselors and 1.66 guards, among others. The model also asks for average student-teacher ratios, although these figures also take into account teachers outside of general education courses, such as physical education, art or music.

This model is often revised; for example, last year the legislature increased the number of school counselors and nurses considered part of basic education.

State money is also increased in areas of high poverty – where schools have to meet the additional needs of students – as well as in areas with higher costs of living, to help teachers and others school staff to pay to keep up with the cost of living in the communities where they work.

OSPI also allocates additional federal funds to districts with high levels of community poverty and funds grants for programs for English language learners or students enrolled in special education or needing other accommodations due to of a disability.

However, when districts get the money — from all those sources — it’s up to local school boards and administrators to figure out exactly how to spend it. Districts set school and class sizes, determine the number of principals and administrators in each building, and how much to pay teachers, superintendents, and other staff—at pay rates often above set salary levels by the state, to assist districts with recruitment and retention.

District operating levies can fill funding gaps to reduce class sizes, increase salaries for superintendents or teachers, add school counselors or nurses, or provide after-school tutoring programs to help improve academic achievement. However, districts still spend a portion of their operations levying money on special education staff or meeting other learning needs—expenses that the state budget considers covered by the state and federal dollars – instead of improving their “basic education” programs.

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Connecticut Education, City Groups Say Restriction Prevents Cities From Updating School HVAC Systems – Hartford Courant https://cec-ugc.org/connecticut-education-city-groups-say-restriction-prevents-cities-from-updating-school-hvac-systems-hartford-courant/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:00:50 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/connecticut-education-city-groups-say-restriction-prevents-cities-from-updating-school-hvac-systems-hartford-courant/ As Connecticut public schools face the costly task of upgrading heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, education and municipal stakeholders are calling on the state to reconsider guidelines that prevent districts use federal funds to cover local contributions needed to participate in the state matching grant for CVC. program. The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, the […]]]>

As Connecticut public schools face the costly task of upgrading heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, education and municipal stakeholders are calling on the state to reconsider guidelines that prevent districts use federal funds to cover local contributions needed to participate in the state matching grant for CVC. program.

The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents and the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education released a joint statement on Tuesday advocating the repeal of a restriction that bars municipalities from using federal funds from the American Rescue Plan Act to match the Connecticut Public Grants Program for HVAC and Indoor Air Quality in Schools.

CAPSS executive director Fran Rabinowitz said she already sees this rule impacting district decision-making, especially in municipalities that don’t want to allocate council tax money to HVAC renovations. .

“My main concern is that I hear from several of my superintendents that they have projects they would like to do and that the municipality would be willing to move forward if they could use their ARPA funding,” Rabinowitz said. .

State law regarding school construction grant processes prohibits the use of federal funds as local contribution for matching grants. The CCM, CAPSS, and CABE are asking Governor Ned Lamont and the Department of Administrative Services to reconsider applying the law to the HVAC grant program, arguing that lawmakers did not intend the program to have the same requirements that the construction of the school.

Under current arrangements, districts can use ARPA to reduce the total cost of the project, but municipalities and the state must share the difference.

Governor Lamont announced the Connecticut Public Schools HVAC/Indoor Air Quality Grant Program in September after the COVID-19 pandemic laid bare the need to address overdue HVAC improvements. The administration has pledged $150 million in public school grants with an application deadline of Dec. 1, 2022.

The CCM, CAPSS, and CABE are also calling on the state legislature and DAS to extend the deadline to allow more time for municipalities to plan their projects.

In response to their inquiries, DAS Commissioner Michelle Gilman did not hint at a policy change.

“DAS has worked hard to develop and administer a curriculum established by the state legislature in partnership with state agencies and local schools,” Gilman said. “The program was developed within the parameters established in state law for existing reimbursement school building grants and in a way to leverage the limited funding provided. DAS is excited to offer school districts state dollars for these types of standalone projects for the first time and looks forward to working with all stakeholders to improve indoor air quality in our schools.

Rabinowitz said she was “delighted” when Lamont announced the grant award, but she is disappointed with the funding restrictions.

“I don’t think there should be [ARPA] restrictions in place for municipalities. I would just like to see us move forward and not have those kinds of challenges,” Rabinowitz said. “We have other challenges when we do this, like being able to find contractors, being able to get all the supplies, etc. But that’s a challenge I don’t think we need.”

Rabinowitz said a cost estimate for installing air conditioning in a small elementary school was $1 million. She fears that for communities that lack local capital, the ARPA restriction will prevent the district from applying for the state HVAC grant.

“These projects are very, very expensive,” Rabinowitz said. “If a municipality is not allowed to use matching funds, then it is very difficult for a school district to apply for those funds.”

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CCM Executive Director and CEO Joe DeLong echoed his concern, saying that when discussions about a HVAC grant program began, municipalities did not expect an ARPA restriction for HVAC funds. counterpart.

“If you don’t have enough grant applications to use up all the funds, it might be seen as the need isn’t as great as people thought,” DeLong said. “That is certainly not the case. We know there is a huge need. It’s just the deadlines, with the restrictions that people weren’t expecting, are going to make it difficult for some communities to meet those deadlines and get the grant applications through.

DeLong said he doesn’t want the burden of costly HVAC system upgrades shifted to taxpayers when federal ARPA funds become available.

“It’s disappointing that there’s a limitation on their use that will inevitably force at least some of these projects to be subject to property tax when it’s not necessary,” DeLong said, “We have so many increased inflation, so many challenges that people have locally, day to day, to drive some of this [HVAC] cost in higher property taxes, we just don’t think that’s the best way to do it.

DeLong said he was optimistic about continued dialogue with DAS Commissioner Gilman as the HVAC grant program moves forward.

“[This program] is a first step towards something that must continue to move forward. But getting off on the right foot is important. … I don’t want this preoccupation that we have in trying to solve this problem to reflect on the relationship that we have with the [DAS] curator right now. She was very responsive, very transparent,” DeLong said. “This one small restriction… it is significant, it needs to be changed. But I’m also grateful for the opportunity to have the kinds of dialogue that we have with the commissioner and the partnership that we have to get things done.

Alison Cross can be reached at across@courant.com.

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