Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:50:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Swiss and UK fellows wait as ERC announces awards https://cec-ugc.org/swiss-and-uk-fellows-wait-as-erc-announces-awards/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:31:05 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/swiss-and-uk-fellows-wait-as-erc-announces-awards/ The European Research Council’s 2021 seed grant cycle is unlike any other: almost a fifth of world-class fellows are currently ineligible for their hard-earned funding. Those based in Swiss institutions, which were eligible but were rendered ineligible by a breakdown in Swiss-European Union relations, must uproot themselves or turn to a national regime instead. Their […]]]>

The European Research Council’s 2021 seed grant cycle is unlike any other: almost a fifth of world-class fellows are currently ineligible for their hard-earned funding.

Those based in Swiss institutions, which were eligible but were rendered ineligible by a breakdown in Swiss-European Union relations, must uproot themselves or turn to a national regime instead.

Their UK-based colleagues face a similar situation, although they can secure EU funding if the European Commission finally approves the country’s association with Horizon Europe in time for their grant agreements to be signed. .

It has been known for months that UK and Swiss rewards would come with strings attached, which could partly explain the 25% drop for UK host institutions from the 2020 cycle, with Swiss hosts dropping 17%.

The Swiss and UK governments have promised their winners the prize equivalent of 1.5million euros (£ 1.25million) in domestic funds, but some are still considering relocations to maintain their support for the EU.

“I am absolutely thrilled with the grant and very happy to have the opportunity to complete my project on assisted dying in European writing and visual culture,” said Anna Elsner, an ERC fellow based at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland.

“A decision has not been taken on my side, but I am currently in contact with European institutions interested in hosting my project,” said Dr Elsner, assistant professor of French studies, adding that the exclusion of the Horizon Europe Switzerland was “unsettling for the research projects themselves but also for the lives that are linked to them”.

Between 2021 and 2020, the generally top performing UK grew from 62 to 46 starting scholarships, with Swiss hosts dropping from 34 to 28. The number of UK nationals having obtained starting scholarships increased from 26 to 12 , while the Swiss winners went from 10 to 11.

As in the 2020 cycle, Germany came out on top both in terms of host institution and nationality of researchers, hosting 72 awards and claiming 67 nationals.

With 794 additional applications but 58 million euros less to distribute, the overall success rate of the initial grant fell below the psychological bar of 10%: 9.8 against 13.3 in 2020.

Despite these obstacles, the funder still has much to celebrate, having attracted 3,272 applications and consolidating its status as a world leader by attracting 13 beneficiaries from the United States to the EU.

“I am delighted to see these new ERC Starting Fellowship winners ready to break new ground and build their own teams,” said ERC President Maria Leptin. “Some of them will come back from overseas, thanks to ERC grants, to do science in Europe.

British and Swiss exclusion is nonetheless a doomed start for the EU, with bloc funding helping to feed some of those now facing tough decisions.

“I studied and worked for 15 years in the UK and France before moving to Switzerland, benefiting from European and UK funding programs along the way,” said Dr Elsner. “I have always considered myself a European citizen and the exclusion of Switzerland from Horizon Europe is a big blow.”

ben.upton@timeshighereducation.com


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ARPA grant funds have been extended to Holds Lockers, technology and language learning, and the DCI consultant. https://cec-ugc.org/arpa-grant-funds-have-been-extended-to-holds-lockers-technology-and-language-learning-and-the-dci-consultant/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 23:30:55 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/arpa-grant-funds-have-been-extended-to-holds-lockers-technology-and-language-learning-and-the-dci-consultant/ With a grant, the Round Rock Public Library will expand popular outdoor lockers, add two new subscription services and hire a diversity, equity and inclusion consultant. These projects will provide increased access to library resources and services, especially to community members who suffered greater disruption during the pandemic. One of the subscriptions, O’Reilly Books for […]]]>

With a grant, the Round Rock Public Library will expand popular outdoor lockers, add two new subscription services and hire a diversity, equity and inclusion consultant.

These projects will provide increased access to library resources and services, especially to community members who suffered greater disruption during the pandemic.

One of the subscriptions, O’Reilly Books for Libraries, will bring more than 43,000 books and 30,000 hours of video to meet the business and technological needs of everyone, from hobbyists to professionals seeking career advancement.

The other subscription brings the highly rated Pimsleur language program to the Overdrive collection, giving library cardholders access to even more language learning tools.

The library received the grant from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission as part of its American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) grant program. The library will begin implementing its grant plan in February 2022.

This project is just one of 40 projects made possible this year thanks to a new grant of approximately $ 1.8 million from the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services to the Commission on Library and Archives of the State of Texas under the provisions of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA).

“Communities across the state will benefit from the resources and services made possible by this funding. Libraries will be able to increase access to digital resources and technologies as well as support education, workforce preparation and other local needs as libraries continue their essential work in the service of their communities, ”said TSLAC director and librarian Gloria Meraz.

“We are excited to be able to advance some truly transformational projects designed to give Texans the tools to meet the ever-changing needs of their families and communities,” said the Chair of the Library and Archives Committee of the State of Texas, Martha Wong. “These funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services are critical in enabling us to support the work being done statewide by the information professionals and citizens we serve.”

In 2021, the library responded to changing customer priorities by installing lockers for patrons to access documents outside the building, launching a home delivery service for patrons who cannot check out. going to the library and participating in the inclusive PLA internship initiative. “We hope to continue this momentum through 2022 by providing better access to resources and services, especially to our clients who have been directly affected by the pandemic, economic disruption and racial inequalities,” said the director of the Michelle Cervantes library.


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Council approves measure to give mayor’s office oversight over scholarships https://cec-ugc.org/council-approves-measure-to-give-mayors-office-oversight-over-scholarships/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 19:13:20 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/council-approves-measure-to-give-mayors-office-oversight-over-scholarships/ New Orleans City Council voted on Thursday to include the mayor’s office in the process of distributing millions of dollars a year in city education grants from the Harrah’s Casino Fund – money donated to the city by the casino under a rental agreement. While the disbursement process previously involved negotiations between the Orléans Parish […]]]>

New Orleans City Council voted on Thursday to include the mayor’s office in the process of distributing millions of dollars a year in city education grants from the Harrah’s Casino Fund – money donated to the city by the casino under a rental agreement.

While the disbursement process previously involved negotiations between the Orléans Parish School Board and the City Council, under the resolution approved Thursday, the school board will negotiate with the Mayor’s Office for Youth and Families to submit a list of funding recommendations to city council. .

Thursday was the last meeting of the five outgoing board members, who will be replaced by newly elected members next week. The Harrah’s vote came near the end of the meeting, which spanned from mid-morning until evening, much of which was devoted to discussions on a proposal to allocate $ 35 million to fund moving expenses for residents of Gordon Plaza.

Board members unanimously approved Harrah’s resolution despite a request from school board president Ethan Ashley to delay the vote and reassess the need for the Cantrell administration’s involvement.

“Before we vote on this resolution, it would be my most sincere request to consider whether we need to change the process or just strengthen our relationship,” Ashley wrote in a public comment read aloud by board staff.

In recent years, the NOLA Public School District has attracted challengers for funding, in large part because of the council’s desire to direct funding toward early childhood education. (The district and school board primarily oversee K-12 schools, not early childhood education programs.)

Ashley said the school board had received “brief notice on this extremely important matter,” but thanked incumbent Councilor Jay Banks, for keeping the OPSB in the process in the final version of the resolution.

“Let me be clear that this resolution is not ideal for the school district and we believe the board should not view it as such either,” he said. “This resolution appears to be the result of a lack of relationship between the board and the school district. The council member’s resolution inserts a third entity, the Mayor’s Office for Youth and Families, which luckily is willing to help here, but should not be forced to.

The banks, however, argued that the funding was intended to be used for education at large, and not just for OPSB’s educational programs.

“Joe [Giarusso] teases me about being a dinosaur and that sometimes has its benefits, ”Banks said. “I was actually here when this original legislation was drafted when the lease with Harrah’s was signed and the intention was for the money to be used for education.”

“Now it was by default that it was easy to just say the school board,” he said. “But it was never absolutely necessary that it just be distributed to the school board. The intention was for it to be used for education and that’s what it does.

Without any further comment, the other six board members joined him in the vote to approve the resolution.

Harrah Fund

Since 2004, the NOLA Public Schools District has received money from Harrah’s Fund each year, but the casino’s most recent lease with the city, signed in 2020, no longer explicitly disburses funds to the district. Instead, included a new provision expanding the board’s ability to direct funding toward “education” at the discretion of members.

In recent years, Council and Mayor LaToya Cantrell have pushed for increased funding for early childhood education. This included direct funding from the city and an unsuccessful 2020 mileage proposal that was backed by Cantrell.

The Harrah’s Fund is traditionally distributed after the Orléans Parish School Board presents a proposal to the council’s community development committee.

In the past, these funds went directly to the district, but Harrah’s new lease signed in 2020 expanded the council’s ability to direct the money elsewhere. Last spring, the council sought to increase its investment in early childhood education as the district fought for the funds it traditionally received.

NOLA Public Schools Superintendent Henderson Lewis Jr. appeared before the board in April last year to seek $ 1.5 million in funding for district-wide programs. He also criticized the council for waiting until 2021 to distribute funds that he said should have been paid a year before.

“They are already in our budget. … This would generally have happened in the spring of 2020, ”he said last April.

The council ultimately approved $ 1.5 million for the district to fund three programs – Travis Hill School at the city jail, the district student support office, which houses social workers and monitors absent students. , and the Center for Resilience.

But council members told the district not to expect Harrah’s money in the future.

“Hopefully you will put the $ 1.5 million into your own budget next year,” City Councilor Kristin Palmer said at the time.

At that spring meeting, the board indicated that the school district’s reserve fund was a potential source for the programs it wanted to fund, arguing that Harrah’s Fund money could be better invested in the education of the early childhood. (State and federal funding for K-12 education cannot directly fund early childhood education places.)

Ashley on Thursday slammed the board for letting Harrah’s Fund money languish without disbursing it on time.

“I hope the new board doesn’t let around $ 4 million pile up without a distribution, especially when our school system has been rocked by a pandemic, hurricanes and continues to be as we all work for ourselves. restore, ”he said.

“Overall, I hope we can build a strong partnership to solve our early childhood education issues, where we serve as the co-lead agency and the city’s largest caregiver for our first learners, as well as teaching K-12. “

With the adoption of the resolution, the Mayor’s Office of Youth and Families will be at the presentation table of the Harrah Fund in the years to come. Combined with the council’s expressed interest in funding early childhood programs, it seems likely that this will result in increased funding for non-OPSB programs.

In addition, Thursday, the council approved a resolution to register a new millage of preschool education in the poll of April 30. The council estimates the new mileage would bring in around $ 21 million, which could create up to 2,000 early childhood seats with a state match.


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University of Alaska students sue to protect scholarship and medical education fund https://cec-ugc.org/university-of-alaska-students-sue-to-protect-scholarship-and-medical-education-fund/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 01:50:34 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/university-of-alaska-students-sue-to-protect-scholarship-and-medical-education-fund/ The University of Alaska Anchorage campus on December 30, 2021. Four students filed a lawsuit Tuesday, seeking to maintain a fund that pays scholarships. Two attend the Fairbanks campus, one attends UAA, and one is a medical student. (Lyndsey Brollini / KTOO) Four University of Alaska students are suing the state government in an attempt […]]]>
The University of Alaska Anchorage campus on December 30, 2021. Four students filed a lawsuit Tuesday, seeking to maintain a fund that pays scholarships. Two attend the Fairbanks campus, one attends UAA, and one is a medical student. (Lyndsey Brollini / KTOO)

Four University of Alaska students are suing the state government in an attempt to maintain a fund that pays for scholarships.

Alaska’s Higher Education Investment Fund is at risk of being drained of more than $ 400 million as a result of legislative budget struggles. It pays for the Alaska Performance Scholarships, Alaska Needs Based Education Grants, and the state medical student program, WWAMI.

Riley von Borstel of Seward is one of the students who sued. She is the president of the student body at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She said the scholarships were essential for her and for other students.

“If this funding were no longer available to students, I think the University of Alaska system would see a significant drop in enrollment among Alaska students,” she said. “I think a lot of them would decide not to go to school in Alaska if that funding wasn’t available.”

Students Madilyn Short, Jay-Mark Pascua, Kjrsten Schindler and von Borstel filed a complaint Tuesday against Governor Mike Dunleavy, the Office of Management and Budget and the Department of Administration.

According to the Dunleavy administration, money from the fund must flow into the state savings account if three-quarters of each legislative chamber does not vote each year to maintain funding. And that vote failed last year.

Another lawsuit, filed by the Alaska Federation of Natives and 17 other plaintiffs, successfully protected the Power Cost Equalization Endowment Fund, which has also been threatened by legislative disputes. This fund pays to reduce the cost of electricity in high cost rural areas.

In the new trial, lawyers for both sides jointly requested that a judge quickly hear the arguments in the case and render a decision by February 22, allowing time for an appeal and for the legislature to factor the decision into the budget.

Dunleavy said in a statement that he supports scholarship funding.

University of Alaska Interim President Pat Pitney wrote in a letter to students that the university supports the lawsuit.


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Chelsea Area Garden Club accepts 2022 grant applications https://cec-ugc.org/chelsea-area-garden-club-accepts-2022-grant-applications/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:49:20 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/chelsea-area-garden-club-accepts-2022-grant-applications/ By Cheryl Wells, ACGC The Chelsea Area Garden Club (CAGC) will provide a limited number of grants of up to $ 500 in 2022 to local non-profit organizations for projects related to sustainable horticulture. The deadline to apply is February 15, 2022. Grants support projects that promote a love of gardening, community beautification, environmentally friendly […]]]>

By Cheryl Wells, ACGC

The Chelsea Area Garden Club (CAGC) will provide a limited number of grants of up to $ 500 in 2022 to local non-profit organizations for projects related to sustainable horticulture. The deadline to apply is February 15, 2022.

Grants support projects that promote a love of gardening, community beautification, environmentally friendly horticultural practices, and conservation through education and by example. Applications and information on the annual grant program are available at www.chelseagardenclub.com.

Applications should be mailed to the CACG Grants Program, c / o Cheryl Wells, 98 Cedar Lake Rd, Chelsea, MI 48118. Applicants from the CACG Service Area – Chelsea and the West from Washtenaw County – will be preferred.

Participation in the garden club includes providing educational programs, community engagement through civic beautification, and horticultural grants and scholarships. This fall, CAGC planted more than 1,700 tulip and spring bulbs in Chelsea’s urban flowerbeds and in the planters of the Chelsea District Library. The CAGC designs and plants the annual flower beds for the summer town and the library every year. Horticultural Grants are awarded to local not-for-profit organizations and start-up projects that benefit the community and align with the mission and goals of the ACCG. The CCGA presented the Arts in the Garden Benefit Walk last July to benefit the CSC Intergenerational Garden.

Photo: CAGC


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Responding to Substance Abuse Disorders with Strategic Grants | Social problems https://cec-ugc.org/responding-to-substance-abuse-disorders-with-strategic-grants-social-problems/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/responding-to-substance-abuse-disorders-with-strategic-grants-social-problems/ The third and final installment of our conversation about the Community Foundation’s current strategic grants focuses on responding to substance use disorders (SUD). As noted in our last two columns, the Frederick County Human Needs Assessment in 2018 provided the data the Community Foundation needed to realign its granting priorities to meet Frederick County’s most […]]]>

The third and final installment of our conversation about the Community Foundation’s current strategic grants focuses on responding to substance use disorders (SUD). As noted in our last two columns, the Frederick County Human Needs Assessment in 2018 provided the data the Community Foundation needed to realign its granting priorities to meet Frederick County’s most urgent needs.

Key findings from the 2018 needs assessment included that Frederick County, like the nation and comparable counties, faces SOUTH, including alcohol abuse. Alcohol is a much more widely accepted and less visible form of SUD; many people mistakenly assume that SUD is only related to pharmaceuticals. SUD often coexists with mental health problems, and transportation problems prevent access to treatment in all of these areas. Additionally, residential treatment and drug rehab centers in Frederick County are limited, and few SOUTH practitioners accept Medicaid.

Based on these key findings, our grants committee established criteria for applicants (local nonprofits, local government agencies) to identify outcomes of projects or services that meet the continuation or increase :

• access to timely and qualified treatment and recovery options;

• Education and prevention programs linked to SUD;

• the collection and analysis of data relating to the people affected by SUD and the programs that serve them.

Our recent grant supporting Frederick County’s ability to respond to SUD included Rehabilitation Assistance Programs (Frederick Rescue Mission), an employment program for those affected by SUD (Justice Jobs of Maryland), a SUD adolescent recovery program (The Phoenix Foundation of Maryland) and the Narcan program (Frederick City Police Department).

Grants totaling over $ 197,000 have supported these programs and more, and funding for similar programs over the past two years brings our total grants in this area to just over $ 320,000.

Where does the grant money come from? Community Foundation funds are established by individuals and businesses. Some funds have specific criteria that direct money to programs and services that support families with children, and some funds allow our grants committee to direct the money where it’s needed most. In addition, our newly established Forever Frederick County Fund, an unrestricted endowment created to meet our community’s most pressing needs, is now providing funds to each strategic area. Finally, the Strategic Funding Partners (donors who wish to directly support one or more strategic areas) have made generous donations.

Frederick County is fortunate to have non-profit organizations and government agencies that care about helping people cope with substance use disorders. It is a disease that destroys not only a person’s life, but the lives of those around him. With expanded treatment options and integration services available, more individuals and their families will lead successful lives and have a positive impact in our community.

Editor’s Note: The Community Foundation of Frederick County, MD, Inc., is a non-profit organization that connects people who care about important causes. He works with individuals, families, businesses and organizations to realize their charitable intentions through scholarships and grants to non-profit organizations. To learn more about the Community Foundation, visit www.FrederickCountyGives.org.


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Governor Ivey awards grants to help victims of domestic violence and sexual assault statewide https://cec-ugc.org/governor-ivey-awards-grants-to-help-victims-of-domestic-violence-and-sexual-assault-statewide/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 13:15:18 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/governor-ivey-awards-grants-to-help-victims-of-domestic-violence-and-sexual-assault-statewide/ Governor Kay Ivey has provided grants totaling $ 6.8 million to help provide services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as training and resources to local law enforcement agencies and non-profit. The funds will provide services including safe shelters, crisis lines, counseling, referrals, advocacy, community education and prevention services. “Unfortunately, domestic […]]]>

Governor Kay Ivey has provided grants totaling $ 6.8 million to help provide services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as training and resources to local law enforcement agencies and non-profit.

The funds will provide services including safe shelters, crisis lines, counseling, referrals, advocacy, community education and prevention services.

“Unfortunately, domestic violence affects some families and residents of Alabama, and they deserve to have access to prompt and compassionate services to help them navigate the process of preventing further abuse,” Governor Ivey said. “I am happy to support these organizations which help victims as well as investigations.”

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs administers grants from funds made available by the US Department of Justice. ADECA administers a wide range of programs that support law enforcement, economic development, infrastructure upgrades, recreation, energy conservation, and water resource management.

“ADECA shares Governor Ivey’s dedication to helping victims of domestic violence by ensuring that they and those who help them have the resources and training they need,” said ADECA Director , Kenneth Boswell.

The following grants have been awarded to organizations that provide direct services:

Baldwin Domestic Violence Shelter (Baldwin, Conecuh, Escambia, Monroe): $ 62,045

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Mobile Inc. Family Counseling Center (Mobile, Clarke, Washington):$ 55,000

Penelope House (Choctaw, Clarke, Mobile, Washington): Two grants totaling $ 421,804

City of Andalusia (Covington):$ 134,400

The House of Ruth Inc. (Barbour, Bullock, Coffee, Covington, Dale, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Pike):$ 79,176

SABRA Sanctuary Inc. (Dallas, Greene, Marengo, Perry, Sumter, Wilcox): $ 167,200

Alabama Legal Services, Inc. (Autauga, Bullock, Chilton, Crenshaw, Elmore, Lowndes, Montgomery, Pike): $ 82,984

Family Sunshine Center (Autauga, Butler, Chilton, Crenshaw, Elmore, Lowndes, Montgomery): $ 110,575

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Columbus Alliance for Battered Women, Inc. (Russell): $ 42,990

East Alabama Rape Counselors (Chambers, Lee, Macon, Russell, Tallapoosa): $ 152,000

SafeHouse of Shelby County Inc. (Chilton, Clay, Coosa, Shelby): Three grants totaling $ 868,504

King’s House (Jefferson, Shelby):$ 480,960.

SAN Inc., better known as Turning point (Bibb, Fayette, Hale, Lamar, Pickens, Tuscaloosa): $ 50,908

Domestic violence intervention center (Chambers, Lee, Macon, Randolph, Tallapoosa): $ 85,000

2nd Chance Inc. (Calhoun, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega): Three grants totaling $ 573,146

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Northwest Alabama Inc. Family Resource Center (Walker): $ 27,448

Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (Blount, Cullman, DeKalb, Jefferson, Marshall, St. Clair, Shelby, Walker): $ 92,377

Cullman Victim Services Inc. (Cullman, Winston): Two grants totaling $ 98,853

Safeplace, Inc. (Colbert, Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Marion, Winston): $ 120,000

One Place of the Shoals (Colbert, Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Marion): Two grants totaling $ 171,680

Domestic Violence Emergency Services (Marshall): Two grants totaling $ 244,802

North Alabama Crisis Services, Inc. (Jackson, Limestone, Madison, Morgan): Three grants totaling $ 1.1 million

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Crisis Center Inc. (Blount, Jefferson, St. Clair, Walker): $ 496,000

Tuscaloosa SAFE Center (Bibb, Fayette, Greene, Hale, Lamar, Marengo, Pickens, Sumter, Tuscaloosa): $ 195,000

Northern Alabama Family Services (DeKalb, Marshall): $ 170,000

AshaKiran (Jackson, Limestone, Madison): $ 153,869

Alabama Coalition Against Rape (statewide): $ 223,200

University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa):$ 357,000

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The Pueblo Hispanic Education Foundation receives $ 320,000 https://cec-ugc.org/the-pueblo-hispanic-education-foundation-receives-320000/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 01:55:59 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/the-pueblo-hispanic-education-foundation-receives-320000/ PUEBLO, Colorado – The Pueblo Hispanic Education Foundation, a Pueblo foundation committed to raising funds for scholarships and other educational supports for low-income students, has received two matching County Scholarships from the Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative. COSI is an initiative supported by the Colorado Department of Higher Education. The two scholarships awarded are equivalent to […]]]>

PUEBLO, Colorado – The Pueblo Hispanic Education Foundation, a Pueblo foundation committed to raising funds for scholarships and other educational supports for low-income students, has received two matching County Scholarships from the Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative.

COSI is an initiative supported by the Colorado Department of Higher Education. The two scholarships awarded are equivalent to $ 320,000, the first being for scholarship students who wish to earn a 2- or 4-year degree in any program of study and the second for students studying at the community college level and in the development of technical and vocational education.

These scholarships will be spread over a period of 4 and 2 years respectively, starting in the summer of 2022. Students eligible for this scholarship can renew each year, provided they maintain the requirements, which can reach approximately $ 8,000 for a 4-year diploma. or $ 4000 for a 2 year diploma.

The grant was awarded in conjunction with the Pueblo County Scholarship Fund, which provides the
upfront dollars required to be eligible for the COSI Matching Grant. This allocates a total of $ 640,000 for scholarships starting in the summer of 2022.

In collaboration with Pueblo County and Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative, PHEF will award
approximately $ 3.6 million by the end of 2026.

Executive Director Janelle Quick said, “The Colorado Opportunities Scholarship Initiative was designed
provide only financial support, but also programs to help address timely completion and success in
post-secondary education. ”

Eligible students must be a resident of Pueblo County, have an estimated eligible financial contribution of $ 16,000 or less (as stated on a FAFSA student application), attend a public college or
University of Colorado and have a qualifying GPA that varies depending on specific scholarships.

Students are encouraged to register on the PHEF website for more information and follow PHEF on social media, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and / or LinkedIn.


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Sioux Falls Public Schools Education Foundation receives $ 250,000 donation from T. Denny Sanford https://cec-ugc.org/sioux-falls-public-schools-education-foundation-receives-250000-donation-from-t-denny-sanford/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:56:47 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/sioux-falls-public-schools-education-foundation-receives-250000-donation-from-t-denny-sanford/ Sioux Falls School District logo. SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO.com) – A donation of $ 250,000 to the Sioux Falls Public Schools Education Foundation was recently made by T. Denny Sanford. The donation will support and enhance the group’s four programs, which will have a positive impact on the 24,000 students and 1,800 teachers in the […]]]>

Sioux Falls School District logo.

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO.com) – A donation of $ 250,000 to the Sioux Falls Public Schools Education Foundation was recently made by T. Denny Sanford.

The donation will support and enhance the group’s four programs, which will have a positive impact on the 24,000 students and 1,800 teachers in the Sioux Falls School District.

Allison Struck, Executive Director of the Education Foundation, said, “This generous investment will help us attract and retain the best educators in the state.”

The full Education Foundation press release is available below.

Sioux Falls Public Schools Education Foundation

A donation of $ 250,000 to the Sioux Falls Public Schools Education Foundation will improve the
the organization’s programs for students and staff of the Sioux Falls School District.

Local philanthropist Mr. Denny Sanford
makes the donation, and the donation will support four programs: Public School Pride Grants, New Teacher Grants,
Student Success Fund and Educational Foundation Endowment.

With this donation, $ 100,000 will be used for the Public School Pride Grants.

Any teacher in the district can request up to
$ 10,000 per year to purchase creative and inventive material that provides students with practical and immersive opportunities in the
Classroom. Educators used grants to purchase 3D printers, musical instruments, robots, garden grow kits, artwork
supplies, yoga mats, drones, sensory trails, virtual reality headsets, cardio-battery equipment, English games
language learners, and more.

An additional $ 50,000 will be used to support grants for new teachers.

All first year teachers receive a $ 200 scholarship
Educational Foundation grant to purchase bulletin board materials, posters, organization kits, classroom sets of
books, badges, dry erase markers, flexible seating and student snacks.

At the start of the 2021-2022 school year,
the Education Foundation awarded 79 scholarships for the first time.

The final sum of $ 100,000 will be divided equally between the Student Success Fund and the Educational Foundation endowment.
Student Success Fund helps school social workers connect families in crisis with personal hygiene
products, emergency food aid, winter clothing, bed bug cream and lice shampoo, laundry detergent, shoes and
school supplies.

The Education Foundation also provides city bus passes for high school students who do not have reliable transportation.
and GED scholarships for students who cannot afford the fees.

The remaining $ 50,000 will help improve education
Foundation endowment managed by the Sioux Falls Area Community Foundation.

“This generous investment in the Education Foundation will help us attract and retain the best educators in the state,”
said Allison Struck, executive director of the Educational Foundation. “We want to celebrate these teachers who are
dreaming big to give students opportunities that many would not otherwise have.


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$ 36 million in state road safety grants – Oneida Dispatch https://cec-ugc.org/36-million-in-state-road-safety-grants-oneida-dispatch/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 11:00:19 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/36-million-in-state-road-safety-grants-oneida-dispatch/ ALBANY, NY – The Governor’s Road Safety Committee recently announced that more than $ 35.9 million in federal road safety grants have been awarded to 519 programs across New York State. The purpose of this grant program is to provide funds to local, state and nonprofit agencies for projects that improve road safety and reduce […]]]>

ALBANY, NY – The Governor’s Road Safety Committee recently announced that more than $ 35.9 million in federal road safety grants have been awarded to 519 programs across New York State.

The purpose of this grant program is to provide funds to local, state and nonprofit agencies for projects that improve road safety and reduce fatalities and serious injuries from crashes.

The types of efforts funded include occupant protection; traffic law enforcement; motorcycle safety; traffic records; community programs; programs that impact our young or older drivers; pedestrian safety; road safety and impaired driving.

“New York is working tirelessly to improve the safety of motorists, passengers and pedestrians, and we proudly support these essential programs,” said Mark JF Schroeder, commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles and chairman of the GTSC, in a press release . “The funding supports innovative education and law enforcement initiatives that help improve safety for all who use our roads.

The projects selected revolved around three types of action: traffic police services, child passenger safety and road safety.

A total of $ 31.2 million has been earmarked for road safety grants provided to state, local and nonprofit programs that cover a variety of road safety efforts including education initiatives, improvements traffic logs, training, accident reconstruction and level crossing safety. In addition, the programs cover distracted driving, slow moving vehicles, and drowsiness and impaired driving. These initiatives focus on the protection of child passengers, pedestrians, cyclists, wheel sports athletes, motorcyclists, adolescents and older drivers.

An additional $ 2.5 million is allocated to traffic police departments, supporting initiatives by law enforcement agencies to conduct traffic control campaigns based on accident data. This includes participating in the National Click It or Ticket Seat Belt Mobilization and other enforcement initiatives aimed at targeting dangerous speeding, aggressive and distracted driving, and enforcing seat belt laws and child restraints.

An amount of $ 2.2 million will also be used for child passenger safety, support for child passenger safety education, child passenger safety technician training, car seat verification statewide, operating a car seat distribution program for low-income families and establishing permanent child car seat facilities. stations.

In the state’s regional breakdown for this grant funding, the Capital Region was approved for $ 1,835,436.

The funding, which is provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is administered by the GTSC.

More information about GTSC is available online at trafficsafety.ny.gov.


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