Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 22:19:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://cec-ugc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Education Grants – CEC UGC http://cec-ugc.org/ 32 32 Lawmakers send stimulus bills to Polis 20 | Legislature https://cec-ugc.org/lawmakers-send-stimulus-bills-to-polis-20-legislature/ https://cec-ugc.org/lawmakers-send-stimulus-bills-to-polis-20-legislature/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 21:29:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/lawmakers-send-stimulus-bills-to-polis-20-legislature/ In the dying days of the 2021 legislative session, Gold Dome lawmakers are putting the finishing touches on the Colorado Recovery Plan’s $ 800 million stimulus package. Between the House and the Senate, lawmakers this week moved 20 bills through the legislative process and onto the desk of Governor Jared Polis. These include: Bill 1104, […]]]>


In the dying days of the 2021 legislative session, Gold Dome lawmakers are putting the finishing touches on the Colorado Recovery Plan’s $ 800 million stimulus package.

Between the House and the Senate, lawmakers this week moved 20 bills through the legislative process and onto the desk of Governor Jared Polis. These include:

  • Bill 1104, which aims to extend the accreditation period for educators from five to seven years;
  • Bill 1149, which calls on a number of state agencies to develop career paths for the energy sector;
  • Bill 1234, which aims to provide just under $ 5 million in grants to local education providers for high-impact tutoring to address the learning loss caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Bill 1253, a measure of $ 5 million for grants for renewable and clean energy projects;
  • Bill 1263, a $ 10 million program to encourage meetings and events in Colorado;
  • Bill 1265, which would allow restaurants, bars, caterers and other food and beverage service providers to deduct up to $ 70,000 each month from the state’s net taxable sales between June and August of this year;
  • House Bill 1270, which would invest $ 3 million in the Colorado Employment First Program with the goal of withdrawing a total of federal government matching for counties and third-party organizations to provide employment supports, employment retention services and workplace learning opportunities;
  • Bill 1290, a $ 15 million measure to fund Colorado’s plan to support workers and communities dependent on jobs in coal mines and factories;
  • Bill 1302, which would send $ 15 million to the Office of Economic Development to continue a grant program approved last year to support small businesses affected by the pandemic;
  • Senate Bill 202, which would spend $ 10 million on air quality improvement projects in public schools;
  • Senate Bill 203, a $ 2.5 million measure promoting Colorado-grown foods;
  • Senate Bill 204, which would invest $ 5 million in two rural economic development grant programs administered by the Ministry of Local Affairs;
  • Senate Bill 229, which creates a grant program for businesses opening in a designated rural start-up area;
  • Senate Bill 230, which would send $ 40 million to the Colorado Energy Office, much of which would go to the former COO of the office that now runs the Colorado Clean Energy Fund, which he established while still in the office state energy;
  • Senate Bill 231, a $ 3 million measure that funds grants to help low-income households reduce their energy costs and insulate their homes;
  • Senate Bill 235, which would send the Department of Agriculture $ 5 million for energy efficiency and soil health programs;
  • Senate Bill 236, which aims to create four scholarship programs for childcare and education as well as to make changes, including the elimination of the repeal date, of two scholarship programs for childcare existing;
  • Senate Bill 239, which would require the Colorado 2-1-1 Collaborative to provide referrals to behavioral health services;
  • Senate Bill 252, a move that invests $ 65 million in projects that create or revitalize mixed-use malls in a small Colorado town; and
  • Senate Bill 241, which creates the Accelerated Small Business Growth Program, which is designed to provide business development support for businesses or businesses with fewer than 19 employees.

If Polis signed these bills, and he should, they would join the Senate bills. 42, 110 and 112 – the elements of the package which have already been enshrined in state law.

There are still a dozen outstanding invoices in the package, although these are also close to the finish line.



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Company Bulletin Board: Anders Website Wins; Creve Coeur Announces Business Awards | Local company https://cec-ugc.org/company-bulletin-board-anders-website-wins-creve-coeur-announces-business-awards-local-company/ https://cec-ugc.org/company-bulletin-board-anders-website-wins-creve-coeur-announces-business-awards-local-company/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/company-bulletin-board-anders-website-wins-creve-coeur-announces-business-awards-local-company/ Assistance League of St. Louis received a donation of $ 10,000 from Dan and Lusnail Haberberger, the founders of Luzco Technologies LLC, an electrical engineering consulting company. Anders CPA + Consultants received a Marketing Achievement Award for Best New Website at the 2021 Summit from the Association for Accounting Marketing. Anders worked with a web […]]]>







Assistance League of St. Louis received a donation of $ 10,000 from Dan and Lusnail Haberberger, the founders of Luzco Technologies LLC, an electrical engineering consulting company.


Anders CPA + Consultants received a Marketing Achievement Award for Best New Website at the 2021 Summit from the Association for Accounting Marketing. Anders worked with a web design and development agency Integrity Web Consulting about the project.

the Crève Coeur Economic Development Committee announced the following winners of its corporate awards:

• Community Heart Award: Shaare Emeth Congregation

• Most innovative company award: Dr David Katzman and Dr Jennifer DeLaney, who developed a powered air purifying respirator

• Green business award: O’Connor Insurance

• Favorite restaurant price: Mediterranean Grill Orzo

Charter Communications Inc. announced a $ 1 million pledge to the Spectrum Digital Education 2021 grant program to support nonprofits that educate community members about the benefits of broadband and how to use it in their lives .

The League of St. Louis Assistance received a donation of $ 10,000 from Dan and Lusnail Haberberger, the founders of Luzco Technologies LLC, an electrical engineering consulting company.



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SIUE CODES project obtains a national endowment of $ 100,000 for the humanities grant https://cec-ugc.org/siue-codes-project-obtains-a-national-endowment-of-100000-for-the-humanities-grant/ https://cec-ugc.org/siue-codes-project-obtains-a-national-endowment-of-100000-for-the-humanities-grant/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/siue-codes-project-obtains-a-national-endowment-of-100000-for-the-humanities-grant/ Southern Illinois University Edwardsville continues to excel in digital humanities, securing nationwide funding for its innovative collaborative programming. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced $ 24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects nationwide. SIUE’s project, CODES: Community-Oriented Digital Engagement Scholars, received $ 100,000 in financing. EDWARDSVILLE, Illinois., June 3, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb […]]]>


Southern Illinois University Edwardsville continues to excel in digital humanities, securing nationwide funding for its innovative collaborative programming. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced $ 24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects nationwide. SIUE’s project, CODES: Community-Oriented Digital Engagement Scholars, received $ 100,000 in financing.

EDWARDSVILLE, Illinois., June 3, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – University of Southern Illinois at Edwardsville continues to excel in the digital humanities, securing national funding for its innovative collaborative programming. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced $ 24 million in grants for 225 humanities projects nationwide. SIUE’s project, CODES: Community-Oriented Digital Engagement Scholars, received $ 100,000 in financing.

CODES is a three-year project that will implement a general education pathway that will introduce underserved students to digital community engagement. Its first cohort of academics will begin in the fall of 2022.

The project is led by the principal investigator (PI) Jessica DeSpain, PhD, professor at the Department of English Language and Literature and co-director of SIUE Interdisciplinary Research and Computer Science (IRIS) Center, and co-PI Connie Frey Spurlock, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of SIUE Successful Communities Collaborative (SSCC).

SIUE additional key personnel include Jessica harris, PhD, Vice-Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Howard rambsy, PhD, professor in the Department of English Language and Literature. CODES is a collaboration with Lewis and Clark Community College, whose team members are Jennifer Cine and Jill lane.

“Designed for first generation, Black, Latinx and / or Pell students, CODES aims to help students understand the integral role of the humanities in solving transdisciplinary problems early in their academic careers,” said DeSpain .

DeSpain will handle most of the design and administration of the project’s curriculum, while Frey Spurlock will focus on building community partnerships. CODES fellows will work in small research teams that focus on a seemingly intractable problem, such as climate change or manifestations of poverty in rural and urban environments.

“Integrated into community organizations, students will learn to engage ethically and effectively in digital and face-to-face environments, a skill for which the humanities are uniquely equipped,” explained DeSpain. “The research team’s courses are designed to focus on the problem first and give students hands-on experience in essential 21st century professional skills, including creative problem-solving, collaboration, ethical literacy and education. ‘adaptability.

The CODES project combines and builds on multiple successful initiatives that allow SIUE to stand out at regional and national level. Each year, the IRIS Center introduces more than 300 students to digital humanities methods through programming and classroom support. The SSCC matches community organizations and municipalities with faculty and students to meet environmental, social and economic needs.

Additionally, SIUE was named Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation (TRHT) Center by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). By preparing middle and high school students to work alongside community members, SIUE’s TRHT center strives to build authentic and trusting relationships for building sustainable communities where people from all walks of life can enjoy themselves. flourish.

As a complement to this project, Lewis and Clark implemented high-impact practice-based cohort-based programs at his specialty college, which are specifically designed for underserved students. Honors College currently has 22 students, but will add 10 more enrolled through the CODES partnership. By strengthening ties with SIUE, the CODES program will provide distinguished students with a four-year experience.

With its announcement, the NEH highlighted the diversity of exemplary humanities projects receiving funding. The CODES project is one of 26 grants, totaling $ 1.4 million, awarded in the Humanities Connections category of the NEH.

“NEH is proud to support these 225 new projects, which embody excellence, intellectual rigor and a dedication to the pursuit of knowledge, even as our nation and the humanities community continue to face the challenges of the pandemic.” , said the interim president of NEH. Adam wolfson. “We look forward to the contributions these projects will make to our understanding of ourselves and our society through exemplary humanities research, publications, documentary films, exhibitions and undergraduate programs.”

A complete list of NEH grants awarded in April 2021 is available here.

By preparing the next generation of leaders in a knowledge-based economy, SIUE Higher School meets the region’s demand for highly qualified professionals. Graduate school offerings include arts and sciences, business, education, engineering, nursing, and interdisciplinary opportunities. SIUE professors provide students with a unique integration of theoretical teaching and practical research experiences. Students can earn graduate certificates or pursue master’s studies and be part of a supportive learning and rich intellectual environment tailored to the needs of adult learners. The Graduate School increases the visibility of research and creation activity at SIUE, which ranks first among its Illinois Board of Higher Education peers in total research and development spending, according to the National Science Foundation. Doctoral programs are available in nursing practice and educational leadership. Cooperative doctoral programs in environmental history, resources and policies, engineering and computer science are offered with SIU Carbondale.

Media contact

Megan Wieser, University of Southern Illinois at Edwardsville, 618-650-3653, mwieser@siue.edu

SOURCE University of Southern Illinois at Edwardsville



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Senator Donna Mercado Kim: UH Faculty Union attacks are “false truths” https://cec-ugc.org/senator-donna-mercado-kim-uh-faculty-union-attacks-are-false-truths/ https://cec-ugc.org/senator-donna-mercado-kim-uh-faculty-union-attacks-are-false-truths/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 10:11:35 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/senator-donna-mercado-kim-uh-faculty-union-attacks-are-false-truths/ The University of Hawaii Professional Assembly recently launched several public attacks, one denouncing the UH budget approved by the legislature last month, the others a more personal attack. directed towards me for daring to question the policies and practices of the institution. It would be exhausting to offer a point-by-point rebuttal of the criticisms of […]]]>


The University of Hawaii Professional Assembly recently launched several public attacks, one denouncing the UH budget approved by the legislature last month, the others a more personal attack. directed towards me for daring to question the policies and practices of the institution.

It would be exhausting to offer a point-by-point rebuttal of the criticisms of the UHPA, which reflect the strident and selfish exaltation of a union defending the names of its members. As an elected official, I often accept criticism, except when it is full of untruths and personal attacks.

So allow me to offer these key points.

High costs

Why are the administration of the UH and the UHPA not looking for solutions to the very high cost of education at the University of Hawaii?

Student debt in our country is at an all time high. Graduates struggle with decades of loan repayments. My goal, shared by my fellow legislators and our entire community, is to ensure that the University of Hawaii offers great education at an affordable cost. We do not fulfill this mission.

UH Manoa estimates the cost of a year of school at $ 29,920, roughly split between tuition and education fees and living expenses. The Kapiolani Community College estimate is $ 4,624 for tuition and school fees, or $ 22,563 if independent living expenses are added for a full-time student.

Spending at the University of Hawaii continues to rise, the cost of an education continues to rise as enrollment over many years has fallen.

Rather than embarking on a series of self-examinations, a search for greater efficiency in the system, the administrators of the UH rather appeal to the legislature for more money. The latest, the Hawaii Promise scholarship program, which I have increased and doubled in its ownership, aims to help local students afford college. But these well-intentioned efforts don’t spur the university to cut back on spending and make the college more affordable.

By accepting the chairmanship of the Senate Committee on Higher Education, the former presidents warned me that they had urged UH administrators for decades to be more responsive to students, to cut down on a large bureaucracy, to keep professors responsible for teaching loads at UH and to rank researchers the same way as others R1 universities do this – only to be intimidated by UHPA. I have just experienced this intimidation while the UHPA now accuses me, as they did my predecessors, of having an “agenda” or reasons other than the responsibilities of monitoring good governance.

The last president of House Higher Education who proposed many of the same concerns was targeted by the UHPA in his bid for re-election and the union spent over $ 90,000 to overthrow him without success. This has been and continues to be an uphill battle as the UH and UHPA will do everything to maintain the status quo and avoid painful decisions.

UH Manoa Hawaii Room
Hawaii Hall on the UH Manoa campus in 2017. The faculty union charged a state senator over the budget. Cory Lum / Civil Beat

I challenge the UH and UPHA to justify to students, parents and taxpayers how a faculty member can teach (according to UH data) zero courses, not hold office hours on the campus, provide little or no extramural funding, and be paid over $ 345,000 a year.

Teacher

How many professors comply with the university’s educational policy?

Board of Regents policy 9.214 states: “Teaching being the top priority of the university, teaching remains the most important duty of its faculty. “

The policy states that a full-time faculty member teach 24 credit hours per semester in Manoa, Hilo and West Oahu. This load is 27 semester credit hours at community colleges.

But UH data shows that many professors in Manoa only teach eight to 12 credit hours per year. UH administrators recognize the disparity between what is required and what is reality; many UHPA members have brought to my attention the inequalities between teachers and non-teachers in terms of workload, performance and salary, which is why the legislature adopted Concurrent Senate Resolution 201 (discussed below).

Although students bear the cost of their studies, they often do not have the benefit of senior, top-notch faculty in the classroom, as many courses are taught by graduate students and lecturers. Parents complain that students cannot graduate on time because compulsory classes are scheduled to meet the needs of students, not students.

In contrast, our public school teachers are paid a quarter of a teacher’s salary, do not have the luxury of assisting a graduate student or lecturer, and cannot choose their workload or the hours of the day they will be working.

Tenure Track

UHPA reviews on Senate Bill 1328, which would deny tenure to non-teaching faculty, failed to address the underlying issue of unwarranted employment policies.

Few, if any, colleges in the United States or at UH’s peer universities grant tenure to researchers. This is why Hawaii is known as the “gravy train”. Other institutions require researchers to attract extramural research grants to cover 40 to 80 percent of their salaries and benefits. Instead, the UH pays its research staff out of general funds.

The UHPA claims this could jeopardize Hawaii’s R1 status, which is false because most, if not all, of the R1 institutions do not hire researchers. Additionally, UH uses tuition fees paid by students to complete research unrelated to their teaching.

In another example of UH’s resistance to change, the school has seven different classifications of employees. Comparable schools only have three.

The University of Hawaii is responsible to the students and taxpayers of this state.

In response to UHPA concerns, I postponed SB 1328 and the UHPA agreed to draft a resolution revising the tenure process. The UHPA draft served as the basis for the final resolution, SCR 201. A separate resolution on extramural funding was also presented and both were heard at the same time. The two called for a UH working group, so the Higher Education Committee combined the two for efficiency as the two are linked.

The resolution, approved by both chambers, calls on the administration of the UH and the UHPA to convene a working group to examine and evaluate the establishment’s tenure system for researchers and other non-teaching staff and the structure compensation for teachers engaged in activities supported by extramural funding and grants, compare them to similar schools and suggest best practices that could be adopted by UH.

Taxpayer money

The University of Hawaii is responsible to the students and taxpayers of this state.

As the recipient of a significant portion of public funds – $ 473 million in general funds in each of the next two fiscal years – the University of Hawaii has an obligation to ensure that the money is spent with caution. The HU must ensure that it makes the most of every tax dollar, that unnecessary spending is reduced or eliminated, and that its policies and practices are up to date.

It is the mandate of every public body, and the university is no exception.



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Boys and Girls Clubs of Kern County Receive $ 55,000 Grant from Taco Bell Foundation https://cec-ugc.org/boys-and-girls-clubs-of-kern-county-receive-55000-grant-from-taco-bell-foundation/ https://cec-ugc.org/boys-and-girls-clubs-of-kern-county-receive-55000-grant-from-taco-bell-foundation/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 17:41:50 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/boys-and-girls-clubs-of-kern-county-receive-55000-grant-from-taco-bell-foundation/ BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – Boys and Girls Clubs of Kern County have received a grant of $ 55,000 from the Taco Bell Foundation. The organization said the grant money will be used to fund career / college preparation sessions, mentoring, summer jobs and other programs supporting more than 150 teens in the Bakersfield community. . […]]]>


BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – Boys and Girls Clubs of Kern County have received a grant of $ 55,000 from the Taco Bell Foundation.

The organization said the grant money will be used to fund career / college preparation sessions, mentoring, summer jobs and other programs supporting more than 150 teens in the Bakersfield community. .

“We are honored to partner with the Taco Bell Foundation to champion the educational dreams of our youth,” said Zane Smith, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Kern County. “The vision we share with the Taco Bell Foundation is one in which every young person has access to quality education and the resources they need to create good.

BGCKC is just one of more than 400 youth-serving organizations that will receive a portion of $ 10 million in grants from the Taco Bell Foundation.

“We are proud to support like-minded organizations through our local grants program,” said Jennifer Bradbury, interim executive director of the foundation. “Together with these organizations, we are working to break down barriers so that students across the country can continue to create and innovate. That $ 10 million goes to those in our local communities who are most eager to learn. “



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New statewide grant gives free tuition to recent high school graduates https://cec-ugc.org/new-statewide-grant-gives-free-tuition-to-recent-high-school-graduates/ https://cec-ugc.org/new-statewide-grant-gives-free-tuition-to-recent-high-school-graduates/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 18:01:45 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/new-statewide-grant-gives-free-tuition-to-recent-high-school-graduates/ SYLVA – Anyone who graduated from a North Carolina high school in the past six months is eligible forhave some or all of their tuition and fees covered at Southwestern Community College over the next two years through Governor Roy Cooper’s NC Longleaf Engagement Grant. To qualify, students must complete the Free Application for Federal […]]]>


SYLVA – Anyone who graduated from a North Carolina high school in the past six months is eligible for
have some or all of their tuition and fees covered at Southwestern Community College over the next two years through Governor Roy Cooper’s NC Longleaf Engagement Grant.

To qualify, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). They must also be residents of North Carolina and enroll in an Associate’s Degree or SCC qualifying certificate program for the next academic year that begins August 16.

Eligible students will receive between $ 700 and $ 2,800 per year. The amount will be calculated based on each student’s submission to the FAFSA. Even students who are not eligible for federal financial aid such as Pell Grants may be eligible for this new program.

Funding is a grant, not a loan, and will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

“This is a unique opportunity for students in Jackson, Macon and Swain counties to have their tuition and tuition fees fully covered,” said Dr. Thom Brooks, SCC Executive Vice President for education and student services. “With limited funds available, the best way to ensure that you have the opportunity to receive this financial support is to start the process today.”

For tips on how to complete the FAFSA, visit: https://tinyurl.com/4hhx694f.

For more information on the Longleaf Engagement Grant, see: https://tinyurl.com/2btccacn.

For more information on how to take advantage of the Longleaf Engagement Grant at SCC, contact Sayward Cabe – SCC Director of Financial Aid – at 828.339.4315 or s_cabe@southwesterncc.edu.

ABOUT SOUTHWESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE…

For over 50 years, Southwestern Community College has served Jackson, Macon, Swain and Qualla Boundary counties by providing a wide range of educational options for residents at all stages of life. SCC was ranked # 1 by Bestcolleges.com in its list of “Best Community Colleges and Vocational Schools of 2020”, marking the fourth time in the past 15 years Southwestern has been ranked among the top 10 community colleges nationwide. SCC offers a supportive learning environment and over 40 degree programs in health sciences, arts and sciences / college transfer and career technologies. CCN also offers a variety of community resources, including the Small Business Center, continuing education for the workforce, and career counseling services.



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Utah’s seismic renovations work, but local schools mostly foot the bill https://cec-ugc.org/utahs-seismic-renovations-work-but-local-schools-mostly-foot-the-bill/ https://cec-ugc.org/utahs-seismic-renovations-work-but-local-schools-mostly-foot-the-bill/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 23:44:53 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/utahs-seismic-renovations-work-but-local-schools-mostly-foot-the-bill/ If there was one positive side to the 5.7 magnitude earthquake that rocked the Wasatch frontline on March 18, 2020, it was that in-person learning had been suspended in schools due to the COVID-19, leaving buildings empty so that no injuries have occurred. But the earthquake had significant financial impacts, especially where older schools had […]]]>


If there was one positive side to the 5.7 magnitude earthquake that rocked the Wasatch frontline on March 18, 2020, it was that in-person learning had been suspended in schools due to the COVID-19, leaving buildings empty so that no injuries have occurred.

But the earthquake had significant financial impacts, especially where older schools had not been altered to survive a major earthquake.

The earthquake caused significant damage to West Lake STEM Junior High in West Valley City, which was later considered “a complete loss,” according to the March 2021 Front Wasatch Unreinforced Masonry Reduction Strategy report. The Granite Board of Education recently agreed to an insurance settlement of $ 37.4 million to repair the school.

Two other schools in the Granite District – Granite Park Junior High and Cyprus High – were also damaged. In the Davis School District, Clearfield and Davis Junior High both suffered damage to the expansion joints and the latter damaged the flooring.

Schools in the Jordan, Weber and Tooele school districts also suffered minor and mostly cosmetic damage.

Yet in places like the Salt Lake City School District, which has been modernizing schools for years, no damage has been reported.

The fault zone represents a “ catastrophic ” threat

Seismic risk is significant along the Salt Lake Valley, where the Wasatch Fault “constitutes one of the most catastrophic natural threat scenarios in the United States. The Front Wasatch has a 43% chance of an earthquake of magnitude 6.75 or greater in the next 50 years, and experts predict that such an event would be among the deadliest and costliest disasters in the history of the United States, ”the report says.

The proximity of the fault to a densely populated urban corridor is a major risk factor.

“This danger is compounded by the number of people who live, learn, work, worship or shop in URM (unreinforced masonry) buildings and may not be aware of the potential danger. In addition, those who live in URM buildings often include a disproportionate number of disadvantaged and marginalized populations, ”the report says.

Typically, unreinforced masonry buildings have brick walls with little or no steel rebar. In earthquakes, unreinforced masonry buildings that have not been renovated often collapse inward and outward, “collapsing on people, vehicles, sidewalks or others. structures in and around them, ”the report says.

The Wasatch Front Unreinforced Masonry Reduction Strategy study also notes that some Utah school districts have been upgrading or replacing seismically deficient school buildings for more than two decades.

“While much has been done, there is a disparity between school districts with significant financial resources and those unable to overcome the major obstacles to dealing with seismic-deficient buildings, including the lack of viable funding mechanisms,” he indicates.

The report notes that Utah requires children to attend school, “therefore, the state should be seen as a partner in ensuring that all schools are safe.”

According to the report, to create a harm reduction program for schools, the following goals must be met:

• Validate and finalize the statewide inventory of unreinforced masonry school buildings.

• Meet with individual districts to review inventory and discuss mitigation options.

• Assess building risks and prioritize renovations or mitigation strategies.

• Establish a target date for all unreinforced masonry schools to be redeveloped, modernized or demolished within a maximum of 12 years.

• Fund seismic mitigation. Prioritize state and federal funding for school districts that are unable to develop local funding options.

Who pays to be prepared?

Overall, school districts cover the costs of replacing or upgrading schools themselves, although some have secured limited federal grants to carry out the work.

Beginning in the 1990s, the Salt Lake City School District embarked on a comprehensive effort to renovate and rebuild vulnerable schools by spending more than $ 200 million from voter-approved bonds. The initiative expanded to $ 401 million over the next two decades, the report says.

The investment seems to have been cautious. There have been no reports of damage to schools in Salt Lake after the Magna earthquake.

The last two school reconstructions were completed in 2019. The district’s aging administration building is the latest facility to be addressed. The school board has discussed plans for the structure on several occasions, but the matter has been put on hold as the district addresses the impacts of COVID-19, the Salt School District spokesperson said. Lake City, Yándary Zavala Chatwin.

According to the report, the Salt Lake bond issues were approved by voters “because the town and parents of school-aged children saw the effects of the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989 and wanted their schools are safe ”.

The 6.9 magnitude earthquake in the San Francisco area caused 63 deaths, 3,757 injuries and an estimated $ 6 billion in damage, according to National Geographic.

The Murray City School District completed life safety renovations to all of its school buildings ahead of the March 2020 earthquake. The effort began ten years ago using a combination of federal grants and bonding.

The Magna earthquake damaged only one Murray School, a one foot non-structural crack in Horizon Elementary School.

According to John Masek, a licensed structural engineer who served as a project manager for the Murray District renovations, there is a significant cost-benefit ratio to seismic mitigation.

“It is often much more cost effective to renovate before an earthquake than to repair or replace buildings after an earthquake has damaged them. Additionally, and more importantly, the seismic modernization helps protect the lives of students and faculty at the facilities, ”Masek said in a press release from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Granite chooses to replace rather than repair

The Granite School Board decided that instead of repairing the West Lake STEM Junior High, it would be rebuilt with the $ 37 million from the insurance and emergency bond authority covering the remaining construction costs. , estimated at between $ 10 million and $ 15 million, said communications director Ben Horsley.

Since the start of this school year, Westlake STEM Junior High School in Granite has operated out of the former Westbrook Elementary School in Taylorsville. The elementary school was vacant because the school board voted to close it at the end of 2019.

This school year, some 900 students were bused to the school, which is approximately 8 km from their home campus. Modular classrooms were installed on the elementary school campus and the district made building modifications to accommodate more students and meet the needs of junior high school programs.

For example, elementary schools use multipurpose rooms as dining halls and gymnasiums. Since a high school schedules gymnastics classes throughout the day, it needs a dedicated space for this purpose. Showers and changing rooms had to be set up.

Earlier this month, the school board approved the acquisition of a $ 348,120 relocatable lab building to be installed on the temporary West Lake campus. The district also spent at least $ 3.7 million on site upgrades and the purchase of additional school buses.

Although the insurance settlement would have covered repairs to the 1960s school, it would not cover the costs of upgrading the equipment. Some of these upgrades are made necessary by advances in school technology, but also by changes in school operations and hygiene practices resulting from the pandemic, Horsley said.

Lower secondary was due to be rebuilt in five to ten years, but the school board has chosen to increase the schedule when interest rates are favorable.

“We hope to do it within an accelerated time frame. This obviously means that everything must go perfectly. But we hope that the students can be in this building in the fall of 2023. If this continues for a few more months, that’s okay, but it’s our goal and we want to have a big, hairy and daring goal and give it a try. and do it by then, ”Horsley said.



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Arkansas Black Hall of Fame Foundation Announces $ 48,000 in Grants | New https://cec-ugc.org/arkansas-black-hall-of-fame-foundation-announces-48000-in-grants-new/ https://cec-ugc.org/arkansas-black-hall-of-fame-foundation-announces-48000-in-grants-new/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/arkansas-black-hall-of-fame-foundation-announces-48000-in-grants-new/ Arkansas Black Hall of Fame Foundation (ABHOF) awarded $ 48,000 in grants to projects benefiting minority and underserved communities in an online grant presentation on May 25, including one in Faulkner County. The University of Central Arkansas (UCA) Community and Economic Development Center in Faulkner County received a grant to help fund the first Arkansas […]]]>


Arkansas Black Hall of Fame Foundation (ABHOF) awarded $ 48,000 in grants to projects benefiting minority and underserved communities in an online grant presentation on May 25, including one in Faulkner County.

The University of Central Arkansas (UCA) Community and Economic Development Center in Faulkner County received a grant to help fund the first Arkansas Racial Equity Summit.

The grants, administered by the Arkansas Community Foundation, support projects focused on education, health and wellness, youth development, family strengthening, and economic development in Arkansas.

“We are pleased to support the efforts of local organizations and other Arkansas nonprofits through our grants program,” said ABHOF President Charles Stewart. “Their work to improve education, health and wellness, youth development, economic development and to strengthen families and helps validate the mission of the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame Foundation. We are proud of our partnership with these great Arkansas institutions. “

Over the past 17 years, ABHOF has made $ 619,288 in grants to Arkansas nonprofits. Other fellows this year include:

Arkansas Disability Coalition (Southeast Arkansas) – Expanding telehealth access in Southeast Arkansas to families of children with special health care needs.

Arkansas Prostate Cancer Foundation (Chicot and Phillips counties) – offers two free prostate cancer screening and education events. One in Eudora and one in Helena / West Helena.

Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub (Central Arkansas) – The Xtraordinary Minds PreKoder program introduces children ages 3 to 8 to basic computer coding concepts to improve their reading and writing skills.

Arkansas Single Parent Scholarship Fund (Desha County) – awards scholarships to single parent students in Desha County to help remove financial barriers that would cause a student to drop out of school.

Barbershop Books (Pulaski County) – Partner hair salons are located in communities that have strong ties to the black community and support early literacy programs at four hair salons in Pulaski County.

Central Arkansas Freedom School (Pulaski County) – the facilities service area is home to some of the most economically disadvantaged children, ages 6 to 16, in the town of Little Rock.

EducationCorps, Inc. (Pulaski County) – serves high school and GED homestay students interested in attending college or vocational certification program, with additional academic preparation to take the ACT.

Hamilton Haven (Clark, Hempstead Counties, Nevada) – provides temporary emergency shelter for families and temporarily displaced people.

OneCommunity (Washington County) – offers culturally appropriate bilingual and African American books and materials to families participating in the 2021 Springdale and Fayetteville Feed Your Brain (FYB) Bilingual Summer Reading Program, Alimenta Tu Cerebro.

Southeast Arkansas College (Jefferson County) – offers a virtual learning summer camp for children

Lay Organization of St. John’s Church AME (Jefferson County) – funds a project called “STOP” for students trained to operate in peace.

The Hub (Ouachita County) – a virtual reading program designed for first and second graders that provides cookbooks, food for recipes, and all the supplies needed to read, follow directions, and use skills math for cooking.

UrbanPromise Arkansas (Pulaski County) – supports the Street Leader program for the summer.

Village Place (Pulaski County) – in partnership with the Ujima Maternity Network, offers prenatal, childbirth and parenting support classes in Census Tract 5.

Women & Children First (Pulaski County) – provides funds to purchase furniture for survivors of domestic violence who settle into independent living situations.

Arkansas Black Hall of Fame Foundation aims to provide an environment in which future generations of African American high achievers with Arkansas roots will thrive and be successful. The Arkansas Black Hall of Fame honors the contributions of African Americans through its annual Black Hall of Fame induction ceremony and awards grants to support charitable efforts in underserved communities. Learn more about www.arblackhalloffame.org.



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Biden’s K-12 Budget Seeks $ 20 Billion for State Incentives to Address Funding Inequalities https://cec-ugc.org/bidens-k-12-budget-seeks-20-billion-for-state-incentives-to-address-funding-inequalities/ https://cec-ugc.org/bidens-k-12-budget-seeks-20-billion-for-state-incentives-to-address-funding-inequalities/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 21:36:53 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/bidens-k-12-budget-seeks-20-billion-for-state-incentives-to-address-funding-inequalities/ President Joe Biden on Friday proposed an ambitious $ 6 trillion national budget that calls for a dramatic increase in spending on K-12 education, including $ 20 billion in new incentives for states to increase remuneration of teachers and tackling inequalities in the funding of schools. The proposal would increase the discretionary budget of the […]]]>


President Joe Biden on Friday proposed an ambitious $ 6 trillion national budget that calls for a dramatic increase in spending on K-12 education, including $ 20 billion in new incentives for states to increase remuneration of teachers and tackling inequalities in the funding of schools.

The proposal would increase the discretionary budget of the US Department of Education for the coming fiscal year to $ 102.8 billion, or about 41% above current levels. The plan, which is likely to meet resistance from Congress, echoes Biden’s promise as a candidate to push for a potentially transformational increase in new funding for education.

At the heart of Biden’s education budget: New “equity grants” that would increase funding for Title I, a grant program for the education of disadvantaged students, to $ 36.5 billion from around $ 16 billion dollars, the largest increase in program history.

This new funding would “build on the existing Title I program,” according to a new formula that would address state and local funding models that “favor richer districts over concentrated poverty districts,” a ministry document. ‘Education said. This can create political friction, as can previous efforts to tie the strings to new federal funds.

Politicians concerned about equity have long pointed to the challenges posed by the country’s education financing systems. White-majority districts receive around $ 23 billion more funding than districts that primarily serve students of color, said a report from EdBuild, an organization of frequently cited Democratic presidential candidates in 2020.

“We know that providing more funds for Title I is going to help schools, especially those that are under resourced, have more resources to level the playing field,” the US Secretary of Education said on Friday, Miguel Cardona, during a phone call.

Some lawmakers have said the current Title I formula does not adequately address funding gaps between schools. Rather than replacing this formula entirely, the Biden plan would divide the new Title I funds into a separate grant. To access this funding, states should submit plans on how they could monitor and address gaps in their funding systems, ensuring that teachers are paid at levels comparable to other trained professionals. and similar experience, ensuring students have access to advanced courses and increasing access to early childhood programs, a proposition of the education department said.

A president’s budget proposal helps detail the administration’s priorities, but Biden is unlikely to pass Congress without significant changes. The proposal comes as schools plan to spend nearly $ 130 billion in COVID-19 relief funds provided through the US bailout.

Additional funding for education is needed to change the patterns of inequality that have persisted in American schools for years, the Biden administration said. Biden has campaigned on plans to triple Title I funding, and the budget is a down payment on that, officials said on Friday.

“We need to focus not only on recovering from the pandemic, but also on educating our students after the pandemic to ensure that there are improved resources to rebuild our education system better than before,” said Cardona Friday.

Calls for significant spending on education

The FY2022 budget proposal echoes the priorities of Biden’s U.S. infrastructure plan and his plan for American families.

  • He’s looking for $ 100 billion over 10 years for school infrastructure, $ 50 billion in competitive grants and $ 50 billion in bonds.
  • He is asking for $ 3.5 billion for the creation of new universal preschool programs within the Department of Health and Human Services and funding for two years of a free community college for all students.
  • This would increase funding for the Disability Education Act, the national law on special education, to $ 16 billion, an increase of about $ 2.7 billion.
  • This would increase funding for full-service community schools, which would help coordinate services, such as health care and counseling, to meet the non-academic needs of students. According to the budget, federal grants for this program would increase from $ 30 million to $ 443 million.
  • He calls for a new billion-dollar program to double the number of counselors, school psychologists, nurses and social workers in schools.
  • It is proposing $ 25 million for a program to identify and implement new strategies that make school buildings greener.

The proposal faces political headwinds

The proposal is likely to meet resistance in a deeply divided Congress, where Biden’s party holds a narrow majority and some moderate Democrats have been skeptical of plans to raise corporate taxes to pay it off.

Sen. Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama and vice chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, called Biden’s proposal “a plan for higher taxes, overspending, and disproportionate funding priorities.”

“Fortunately, the president’s proposal is just that – a proposal,” Shelby said in a statement Friday. “In the weeks to come, Congress will exercise its constitutional stock market power by drafting supply bills that I hope will put our nation’s spending first.”

Presidents’ budget proposals are rarely adopted in their entirety. Former President Donald Trump, for example, has repeatedly called for dramatic cuts in education spending and once proposed combining a host of specific programs into one large block grant. But Congress rejected these efforts, effectively increasing the budget for the Department of Education during his tenure.

Although the agency’s budget has increased in recent years, supporters of increasing federal funding for education have said it still falls short of meeting needs. Education represents about 2% of all federal spending, and K-12 schools are largely funded by state and local revenues. K-12 spending is only part of Biden’s education budget, which also includes funding for higher education programs.

Education organizations have welcomed Biden’s budget proposal.

“President Biden’s budget commits much-needed resources to rebuild and reinvest in public schools and American students,” said a statement from Anna Maria Chávez, executive director and CEO of the National School Boards Association. She urged lawmakers to pass it to “ensure our educators have the support and resources they need to help our students heal, learn and thrive.”

“After decades of Title I and IDEA underfunding, President Biden’s historic investments are beginning to fulfill long-standing federal commitments to our most vulnerable students and those in the most underserved communities,” said National Education Association president Becky Pringle in a statement.

Others praised more specific parts of the proposal.

The Education Trust, for example, an organization that advocates for equity in education, was delighted to see the administration’s plans to use the new Title I funding as “a catalyst for state leaders and districts are addressing inequalities in their existing school funding systems ”. CEO Denise Forte said in a statement.

The National Association of Secondary School Principals welcomed the budget call to increase funding for Title II-A, which supports the professional development of teachers and principals.

“Studies show a strong correlation between high quality principals, student success and teacher retention, ”NASSP CEO Ronn Nozoe said in a statement. “School leaders must have the opportunity to acquire professional knowledge to develop their skills in order to ensure equitable learning opportunities for an increasingly diverse student body.”



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Tournament of Roses Foundation announces 2021 grant recipients totaling $ 230,000 – Pasadena Now https://cec-ugc.org/tournament-of-roses-foundation-announces-2021-grant-recipients-totaling-230000-pasadena-now/ https://cec-ugc.org/tournament-of-roses-foundation-announces-2021-grant-recipients-totaling-230000-pasadena-now/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 00:15:56 +0000 https://cec-ugc.org/tournament-of-roses-foundation-announces-2021-grant-recipients-totaling-230000-pasadena-now/ The Tournament of Roses Foundation on Thursday announced 27 organizations in the San Gabriel Valley that have been selected to share $ 230,000 in grants distributed by the organization this year. “The association and the Tournament of Roses Foundation are focused on positively impacting the Pasadena community with charitable giving, volunteering and community involvement,” the […]]]>


The Tournament of Roses Foundation on Thursday announced 27 organizations in the San Gabriel Valley that have been selected to share $ 230,000 in grants distributed by the organization this year.

“The association and the Tournament of Roses Foundation are focused on positively impacting the Pasadena community with charitable giving, volunteering and community involvement,” the tournament said in a written statement. “Since its inception, the Tournament of Roses Foundation has funded over $ 3 million in charitable contributions on behalf of the Tournament of Roses Association.”

The two biggest recipients are the Pasadena-based Fund For Partnership For Success, which will receive $ 35,000, and STEAM: CODERS, which will receive a grant of $ 15,000.

The Fund For Partnership For Success “offers a fully funded summer enrichment program designed to help public school students achieve their academic goals and acquire the skills needed for a better future,” the statement said.

STEAM: CODRES is a Pasadena-based organization that “provides access to education, learning resources, higher education, career opportunities and essential technologies”, while aiming to “bridge the digital divide” and improve the academic outcomes of under-served and under-represented K-12 students. of color in Pasadena, ”said the tournament statement.

Twenty-five other organizations in the region will receive a portion of the renaming grants of $ 180,000 in 2021, which has been allocated to the categories of arts, sports and recreation and education.

They are:

Adelante Youth Alliance
Altadena Arts
Altadena Library Foundation
Arlington Garden in Pasadena
Pasadena Support League
Pasadena Boys and Girls Club
Caltech Y
Club 21 Learning and Resource Center, Inc.
Foothill Creative Arts Group
Girls on the Los Angeles County Run
Jackson PTA
Instrumental music by John Muir HS
La Casa Community Center
Light Bringer Project
Los Angeles Children’s Choir
Mark Keppel High School Dramatic Boosters
Oakwood Brass – Outreach Project
Pasadena Area Reading is Fun-Damental Corporation
Pasadena Audubon Company
Foundation of the young Pasadena Chamber of Commerce
Ronald McDonald House Pasadena
Rose Bowl Riders Charity
San Gabriel Educational Foundation
Side street projects
Stars

More information about each fellow is available online at tournamentofroses.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/2021-Grant-Recipient-bios-FINAL.pdf

For more information on the Tournament of Roses Foundation, visit tournamentofroses.com/foundation.

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